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Showing content with the highest reputation since 10/20/2019 in all areas

  1. 2 points
    Any optimism of getting another sail is officially over. So I'm working on a few details. I had just laid my bunk storage lids under the cushions, but that has proven unacceptable. They mostly stayed in place, but not always. I was looking for an alternative to using piano hinge, but I couldn't figure anything else, so last night I cut piano hinge into suitable lengths and ground the sharp corners with a pedestal grinder. I bought some 1/4" long SS screws off Amazon because out local hardware store only carried 3/8 and even though I've spent a fortune weren't too keen on special ordering for me. Ever since they became and ACE hardware store it's been straight downhill. Oh well. Tonight I'll screw them all down. I got the depth sounder to install and I need to show you all the nice little drawer I put in under the companionway that holds my GPS and assorted stuff I need easy access too. Now, if Jay is reading this, I need more info on your two-way pump. You texted me pics of the install about 4 years ago which I somehow lost. I am sort of a Luddite, but I've conceded a pump would be nice for filling/un-filling the ballast tank.
  2. 2 points
    Thanks Don, it was so “Restrained” it was only going where we wanted it to! A neighbor has cattle and a big JD tractor with a round bale spike on a front end loader, unloading will be easier but for the next few days it is resting comfortably in the trailer.
  3. 2 points
    Amos Swogger sailing his CS20mk3 Amos Swogger Larisa Messabout 2019.mp4
  4. 2 points
    Here are some photos I took. Videos to follow.
  5. 2 points
    About time to update the Mather Flinders build. It has been an easy build so far, a lot of the build is done from the floor, not climbing in and out of the boat. The kit is incredibly accurate, I have used a block plane to fit a few panels but generally it all fits perfectly. The interior panels all have their first 2 coats of epoxy, and I have a date with my sanders after this year’s Messabout for another coat rolled on. Most of the cleats, carlins, and inwales are either installed or are ready to install. All the “horizontal “ surfaces are laying in place but not glued yet. All the plumbing is roughed in and conduit is dry fit for wiring stuff. Picking up a bunch if stuff at this year’s Messabout but there is enough stuff installed to get a feel of the cabin size, and it is “just right”. Just realized some of the photos are several weeks of “progress “ back, hope to be at the 2020 Messabout!
  6. 2 points
    Here is the current photos of the Mathew Flinders, we have been working intermittently for about 3 weeks, all the bulkheads are fileted and taped into place, the head bulkheads are just sitting in place (well almost in place!). A very gentlemanly way to build a boat, standing on the outside reaching in! The “rollbar” is part of the building jig, the inner skin of the cabin will sit on top of the jig, so at 6’3” I have an incredible amount of headroom. To show scale, Carol is standing in the galley.
  7. 1 point
    Hi Lotus, Many thanks for the info and pics - thats exactly what I was hoping to achieve (either a front or rear opening).
  8. 1 point
    In case some people have wondered what is going on with Bluejackets, this is the latest. Plan sales and building is moving along, although at 88, I have started slowing down on all facets of boating. There have been several inquiries about whether a Bluejacket can be built in Aluminum. My answer has always been that a BJ can certainly be built in aluminum but I am not in a position to do detail design and manufacturing in that medium. Quite a few aluminum boats have and are being built in the Pacific Northwest and are used mostly for fishing. None of these boats are, to my knowledge, optimum for cruising, which is a Bluejackets stock in trade. Weight of aluminum is a lot greater per unit of volume than wood which is the main reason that attempts to use other materials have not been pursued to a good conclusion. Weight of the boat and resultant performance advantages of light weight was the driving force behind many decisions in the Bluejacket design. Earlier this year, a builder of aluminum boats in Melbourne, South Australia contacted me about the possibility of using aluminum for 100% of the boat structure. After considerable discussion of what would be involved and by his enthusiasm for the project, work was started on evaluating whether a Bluejacket could gain the benefits of non-perishable material and rugged aluminum structure while retaining its better qualities of performance of the wooden model. Of course, the benefit of an ability to buy a commercially built Bluejacket from a quantity builder was also a main factor. How well this is accomplished is a bit unclear but the prospects look good. While I did do some work on this project, the main effort has been from John Pontiflex who owns and operates Plate Alloy Australia Pty Ltd in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. He builds a fairly large range of aluminum boats that are used mainly for fishing, either commercially or privately. Some modification of structural parts of the wooden Bluejacket was required to utilize aluminum but the design was followed very closely. He says that cruising boats are not a big item in Australia at this point and none that approximate a Bluejacket are available. Therefore a commercially available aluminum Bluejacket may well be a viable offering for Plate Alloy. He also teaches aluminum boatbuilding and the welding techniques necessary to make a good job in one week (or so) courses in various areas of Australia. CNC kits can then be a large part of Plate Alloy’s offerings. Cut files are, of course, available but legal requirements safeguarding their use by those other than Plate Alloy will be required. Shipping costs of ether boats or building material from Australia to the USA are high. Such costs may make shipping of boats or part inventories infeasible but that can be worked around is not known yet. The attached photos show the boat in its unfinished form at the trial launch. The engine is not equipped with final controls and is a larger size with much more weight than the 70hp specified. This engine is a larger than recommended size as that is what John had at the time. Performance is expected to be good with the recommended engines up to the Yamaha 70hp model. Yamaha outboards from 50hp to 70hp all have the same displacement although the 70hp will provide the best high end speed. In case some people have wondered what is going on with Bluejackets, this is the latest. Plan sales and building is moving along, although at 88, I have started slowing down on all facets of boating. There have been several inquiries about whether a Bluejacket can be built in Aluminum. My answer has always been that a BJ can certainly be built in aluminum but I am not in a position to do detail design and manufacturing in that medium. Quite a few aluminum boats have and are being built in the Pacific Northwest and are used mostly for fishing. None of these boats are, to my knowledge, optimum for cruising, which is a Bluejackets stock in trade. Weight of aluminum is a lot greater per unit of volume than wood which is the main reason that attempts to use other materials have not been pursued to a good conclusion. Weight of the boat and resultant performance advantages of light weight was the driving force behind many decisions in the Bluejacket design. Earlier this year, a builder of aluminum boats in Melbourne, South Australia contacted me about the possibility of using aluminum for 100% of the boat structure. After considerable discussion of what would be involved and by his enthusiasm for the project, work was started on evaluating whether a Bluejacket could gain the benefits of non-perishable material and rugged aluminum structure while retaining its better qualities of performance of the wooden model. Of course, the benefit of an ability to buy a commercially built Bluejacket from a quantity builder was also a main factor. How well this is accomplished is a bit unclear but the prospects look good. While I did do some work on this project, the main effort has been from John Pontiflex who owns and operates Plate Alloy Australia Pty Ltd in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. He builds a fairly large range of aluminum boats that are used mainly for fishing, either commercially or privately. Some modification of structural parts of the wooden Bluejacket was required to utilize aluminum but the design was followed very closely. He says that cruising boats are not a big item in Australia at this point and none that approximate a Bluejacket are available. Therefore a commercially available aluminum Bluejacket may well be a viable offering for Plate Alloy. He also teaches aluminum boatbuilding and the welding techniques necessary to make a good job in one week (or so) courses in various areas of Australia. CNC kits can then be a large part of Plate Alloy’s offerings. Cut files are, of course, available but legal requirements safeguarding their use by those other than Plate Alloy will be required. Shipping costs of ether boats or building material from Australia to the USA are high. Such costs may make shipping of boats or part inventories infeasible but that can be worked around is not known yet. The attached photos show the boat in its unfinished form at the trial launch. The engine is not equipped with final controls and is a larger size with much more weight than the 70hp specified. This engine is a larger than recommended size as that is what John had at the time. Performance is expected to be good with the recommended engines up to the Yamaha 70hp model. Yamaha outboards from 50hp to 70hp all have the same displacement although the 70hp will provide the best high end speed. The video does not work for me as yet.
  9. 1 point
    Great work Lenm and nice looking console ! Karnic 1851 boats have a center console that can easily accommodate a person under it when opened from the front side . Maybe you can do some google search about it. The front seat of the console can be opened forward with part of the flooring with it
  10. 1 point
    Looking very nice Lenm. It really starts to look like something when those gunwhales start coming into play. I am just waiting on my gastank before i can get the console in seems to be taking the guy a while
  11. 1 point
    Hi Steve, your boat looks great, sorry you couldn’t make the Messabout, hope to see it and you at next year. The pump is a Johnson Pump F4B-11 Ski Boat Ultra Ballast Pump. It has worked fine for 4 years now. I put the inlet in the centerboard trunk, and it has worked good, except when you pinstripe with the centerboard, mud gets in the tank and it is a PIA to clean the tank out. It is terribly noisy if you mount it directly to a bulkhead, turns the boat into a sounding rod, I used some Lord brand rubber mounts on my second iteration, better. I used pvc on Southern Express, but if I were doing it again I think the PEX would flow better. A perfect time to use the ballast pump as a cockpit wash down pump and water ballon filler with a simple 3 way valve.
  12. 1 point
    Hi Lenm, only the outer part is boxed to give that 2" thickness. All the rest is 1/2" plywood as you can see in this photo
  13. 1 point
    Scott, I'm sorry to hear you won't be finishing the 28 footer. The classified adds associated with the Small Craft Advisor magazine are free and read nationally by people with a soft spot for a project like this one. Smallcraftadvisor.com Thanks again for building Belhaven19 hull #3 (now Clementine). I'm enjoying the boat and give you credit every time someone ask me if I built it. best of luck
  14. 1 point
    Two Bluejacket boats at Georgetown this year and there are quite a few owners here. Egbert
  15. 1 point
    Here is the Southport award for power boat 20' - 29' Here I am between two other award winning boats. I do feel a bit small between them.
  16. 1 point
    Going to be equally interesting to get it out!
  17. 1 point
    This is Bones. Finished a CS 17 MK3 a year ago and interested in MF-246. We live at the north end of ms. We visit the Gulf Coast once in a while. Would be interested in looking at your build. You can email me at captbonespirate.com for more private comms.
  18. 1 point
    Sally and I had a wonderful time at this years Messabout. Thank you to everyone in the B&B family that made it possible. We were delighted to have Nolan Swogger as helmsman on our boat for this years Messabout race. He took his responsibilities seriously and did a wonderful job. There is a little tension in the air as we maneuver before the start of the race. The rest of the crew, wife Sally and friend Paul Stewart. The committee boat. Amos Swogger his wife Lara and another son sailing their beautiful CS20mk3 Working to windward. That look on your face when you are well ahead of the rest of the fleet.
  19. 1 point
    Awwww, Oyster.... I'll catch up next year!
  20. 1 point
    My P-28 is not a plywood boat but the hull is wood core- so essentially the same thing. My transducer came with a two part plastic fitting that was supposed to fit through a hole in the bottom of the boat. Holds the sending unit and screws together to make the assembly waterproof. I did not like that idea at all. What I did was to hole saw down to the outer glass skin, removed all the wood and epoxied a piece of PVC pipe into the hole. I then filled the bottom of the pipe with CLEAR epoxy to come back to the original hull thickness. You want clear to make sure there are no air bubbles. It's the air that degrades/kills the signal. After it cures fill the pipe with mineral oil, drop the sending unit in and put a PVC cap on and away you go. Your pipe needs to be just a smidgen bigger that your sending unit so the sender does not bounce around. It also needs to be totally full of oil. Again you don't want any air bubbles. Mine works really well and I have one less through hull to worry about. Good luck PeterP
  21. 1 point
    This event is always one of the finest get boat together, and way too laid back for most yachty socialites, which makes it top shelf. But I wonder how much faster the fleet would go if you would delay the Friday night and mid day sat eating event until the last thing on sat. Oh from scanning the photos, it does look like the chicken and tea stock was spared a big hit by not seeing the westerner wanderer not being there. [just kidding Sir Chick]
  22. 1 point
    I decided to route lines to the mainmast under the deck. Before I glued down the deck, I mounted turning blocks under the bow pieces and used them to align pilot holes in the deck and locate holes in the bulkhead. I used a piece of cord to where they were headed and lined up a piece of PEX pipe to go through the bulkhead and put fairleads on the deck beams. I put screws through the pilot holes to keep drips out of the blocks below, then when epoxy and painting work was complete broke them out and drilled holes for Racelite through-deck fairleads. Clamcleat makes a cleat with a roller fairlead on the bottom for the line to enter from below. It is a CL230 – looks just like the CL211. I made a little Starboard molding for the line to go over (under?) just before going through the deck. The two cleats shown are for the downhaul and halyard. I put the cleat for the snotter closer to the helm. I think this is about equal in turns and friction to running lines above the deck. A little more trouble to run the lines. I had considered running the lines through lengths of 1/2-inch PEX but it might become mud dauber habitat.
  23. 1 point
    Here’s a great sailing video from last summer. She flies through the water! 02E54811-9660-4A24-A54D-2D64CEF3312B.MOV
  24. 1 point
    Besides missing the event, I'm getting close to the last sail of the season. The days are getting short and the nights in the low 40's. It looks like you are going to have great weather. Take lot's of pictures. Here is another of Skeena winging it.
  25. 1 point
    Alan, All good pieces of advice I incorporated into the recent work. Here's a quick update: The forward bulkheads 1 and 2 have been installed. I scribed them as Alan has suggested and this took a few back and forth installs/sandings to get it just right. I only filleted them to the hull bottom and left the sides open. The reason I did this was to set their vertical positions and it will allow the hull sides to come back into positions when I remove the 2x4 spreader currently installed. I epoxied the forward box hardwood support drainage channels and clampled the pieces together. I also rounded over the inside bottom edge of these pieces with a trim router. Presumably, this is done to remove a sharp edge where you would later 'reach into' the box. Good forethought! After the epoxy set up, I cleaned up the squeeze out, sanded the underside of the butted joint, then glued the small butt piece with thickened epoxy to further strengthen the joint.
  26. 1 point
    Justin, you definitely will need to take some material off the bottom of the bulkhead to allow for the keel glass thickness. I would scribe it with a pencil held flat against the hull and then grab a block plane to trim it or just a sanding block with some 60 or 80 grit paper. Likewise it looks like a gap on the sides just below the side stringers. The cutout (notch) in the top corners of the bulkhead for the side stringers should be widened/opened up if needed to allow the sides of the bulkhead to meed the side of the hull. Take material off the bottom of the bulkhead until the top edge of the bulkhead is flush with the tops of the side stringers. This goes for the forward lower bulkhead as well. Take material off the bottom of it as needed so that the top edge is flush with the tops of the side stringers. You can also round over the chine corners of the bulkheads to allow for the chine glassing/radius. Gaps are no problem if you take off too much material they will just be filled in with thickened epoxy when you glass the bulkheads in but again you want the top edges of the bulkheads flush with the tops of the side stringers and the sides of the bulkheads (ideally) sitting against the inside of the hull sides. That will set the width of the hull there as designed. You shouldn't need to take any material off the sides of the bulkheads. The transverse drainage channel piece (#28) is cut to the width of the inside faces of the stringers so technically the designed hull shape would have you push the hull out to let it drop down between them. However every piece of wood bends differently so what i would recommend is that once you get the forward lower BH and BH2 in place Just trim the ends of that piece to fit between the side stringers. The hull shape will be set by the bulkheads (1, 2, and the center frame) and the side stringer will keep the hull side fair so in this case pushing the hull out at to make the piece fit I think might make the hull less fair. You could always bend a batten (like a 3/4" x 3/4" square piece of clear wood) around the outside of the hull to see how fair it is. If there is a low spot between BH1 and BH2 then you could try pushing it out there to let piece 28 in but I don't think there will be. Piece #8A is a little square of plywood that is designed to go underneath the butt joint where the drain channel turns 90 degrees. It is shown in the side view of the interior construction plan. That piece strengthens the butt joint by sandwiching it between plywood. You could also put a piece of glass tape under (or all around for that matter) the joint. I would be sure to round-over all of the lower edges of the drainage channel pieces at least a 1/4". Piece #22 and #23 are supports for the center of the casting platform. Even if you're not planning to install a seat on the casting deck I would still recommend installing them to help support the casting deck. Hope that helps! It's looking good.
  27. 1 point
    I think I like you yard/view more than the boat frame! 😉
  28. 1 point
    This is gonna be good!
  29. 1 point
    Thanks Alan. That helps. After a week working on the transom framing it's coming together into the shape of a boat. Yes, I can get it out of the room. 😁 I know that because we stitched it up outside and then carried it inside to do the tack-welds.
  30. 1 point
    Well it got wet today, only took me 6 months to do it LOL. Pics are not great as they were taken from the deck by my step mom on her phone but the general idea is there. Boat ran very well in my mind, gets a little slippery in the turn but i think that might be due to the fact that right now it has a 13" prop on it for the maiden voyage. not very good numbers due to tiny prop. 3200 rpm it planned out at 18 knots. 4000 rpm 21knots and 5200 30knots. Now i have run it for 4 or 5 hrs i will go to the motor riggers with those numbers and come back with a proper prop and will get some far better numbers i think. All in all was fun and the boat ran great
  31. 1 point
    Finishing off Ocracoke Jnr whilst waiting for epoxy to dry on Snr:-) Planked her with 3mm h80 foam and sheathed with 4oz aerialite surfboard glass. Just need to finish the inside and ready for fairing. I actually have a scale outboard for it as well which runs!
  32. 1 point
    Hi everyone, I'm new here but purchased a Marissa 18 kit back in July. I was finally able to get started and will try to post progress updates as regularly as I can. I'm liking how everything came out from Graham, I can already see the thought and planning that went into it. I'm so glad I got the cnc cut plywood kit, it saved a ton of time already and there's no question on how precise the fit is. So far I have about 20 hours into this project, although quite a few of them were spent visualizing and thinking! Decided to dry fit to see if anything need adjusting and mainly to see the shape. Just starting but so far so good!
  33. 1 point
    I have a suzuki DF60A (104kg) on my Marissa ( Piranha ) which is build heavier than the original plans because of some alterations I did . With 2 people on board, an auxiliary 22kg outboard hanging at transom and a 15" prop she gave 30.2 knots on gps at 6200 rpm. These boats are super efficient thanks to Graham designs ! In approximately a total of 1 hour at 5000 - 5500 rpm and an other 3 hours at 1500 - 2500 rpm (5 to 7 knots fishing for albacore ) she just burn 22 liters of fuel !!
  34. 1 point
    Here is the keel batten in all of her bulk. Now its time to fair her and the stem for the strips.
  35. 0 points
    I'm totally bummed, but yesterday I had my lead technician turn in his two week notice and proceeded to claim his vacation so he could start a new job immediately. I've treated him very fairly so I'm personally hurt more than anything. Suffice to say I went from being almost all packed ready to leave after work Wednesday to not attending. I am bummed so many ways. I was looking forward to showing off "Skeena", looking at some options you have all done to customize her, racing, sailing with all the other boats that inspired her and sharing stories. I've spent countless hours since MASCF going through a checklist of mods I made to be ready. Errrrrrrh! We are crazy busy and I was already driving straight and making it a quick turnaround. Now I'll just be working.


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