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Showing content with the highest reputation since 11/13/2019 in Posts

  1. 2 points
    I have no worries about through hulls. But what my issue here is running wire to the stern to mount a transducer and it's vulnerability in the kind of shallow water sailing and trailering I intend to do. Same with a through hull one. In the transducer instructions they mention using petroleum jelly for a test and I'm going to hold off to gluing it until I get a chance to test it. first. We had a warm spell but it didn't correspond with any free time so it might be late April until we know. I'm about to put the boat down in my barn for hibernation. My next project is to fire up my late mom's (Suzy J) sewing machine and learn how to sew. She was an amazing seamstress and the machine I inherited is a beast made by Bernina. She made drapes and upholstered furniture and she occasionally made me various cushions and other stuff. I wish she was here to help, but in some ways she is.......
  2. 2 points
    When you upload an image, you can later insert it between text: By positioning your cursor where you want to insert the image and then clicking the image. Here's a short video showing it: http://screenshot.ontrapedia.com/public/fhagan/194f95df-cbe6-412d-a7a2-2002d9cb37431574174805.mp4
  3. 2 points
    Hi Lotus, Many thanks for the info and pics - thats exactly what I was hoping to achieve (either a front or rear opening).
  4. 1 point
    Ya know building a boat, sometimes the obvious isn’t so obvious. When I started building Matt, I had a small container of sheetrock screws, needed more, I bought more......if ya do this, be certain, no very certain you buy screws with the same head pattern. Dragging my feet, the deck panels are prepared, the carlins and inwales are ready to accept the deck. This next week I am building drawer boxes and other fiddly stuff waiting on the ah ha moment when I realize what ever won’t fit now with the cabin top or deck installed!
  5. 1 point
    Steve, good to do the transducer test. Also, good to learn how to sew. When I built a 22' motorboat 20 years ago I was quoted $5,000 to do a full camper enclosure. That's when I bought a sewing machine. I got so much use sewing bimini tops, dodgers, cushions, rain tarps, boat covers, a screen room, bags of all sorts, and a genoa for a Tartan 34 using a high school gym floor to lay it out.
  6. 1 point
    In case some people have wondered what is going on with Bluejackets, this is the latest. Plan sales and building is moving along, although at 88, I have started slowing down on all facets of boating. There have been several inquiries about whether a Bluejacket can be built in Aluminum. My answer has always been that a BJ can certainly be built in aluminum but I am not in a position to do detail design and manufacturing in that medium. Quite a few aluminum boats have and are being built in the Pacific Northwest and are used mostly for fishing. None of these boats are, to my knowledge, optimum for cruising, which is a Bluejackets stock in trade. Weight of aluminum is a lot greater per unit of volume than wood which is the main reason that attempts to use other materials have not been pursued to a good conclusion. Weight of the boat and resultant performance advantages of light weight was the driving force behind many decisions in the Bluejacket design. Earlier this year, a builder of aluminum boats in Melbourne, South Australia contacted me about the possibility of using aluminum for 100% of the boat structure. After considerable discussion of what would be involved and by his enthusiasm for the project, work was started on evaluating whether a Bluejacket could gain the benefits of non-perishable material and rugged aluminum structure while retaining its better qualities of performance of the wooden model. Of course, the benefit of an ability to buy a commercially built Bluejacket from a quantity builder was also a main factor. How well this is accomplished is a bit unclear but the prospects look good. While I did do some work on this project, the main effort has been from John Pontiflex who owns and operates Plate Alloy Australia Pty Ltd in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. He builds a fairly large range of aluminum boats that are used mainly for fishing, either commercially or privately. Some modification of structural parts of the wooden Bluejacket was required to utilize aluminum but the design was followed very closely. He says that cruising boats are not a big item in Australia at this point and none that approximate a Bluejacket are available. Therefore a commercially available aluminum Bluejacket may well be a viable offering for Plate Alloy. He also teaches aluminum boatbuilding and the welding techniques necessary to make a good job in one week (or so) courses in various areas of Australia. CNC kits can then be a large part of Plate Alloy’s offerings. Cut files are, of course, available but legal requirements safeguarding their use by those other than Plate Alloy will be required. Shipping costs of ether boats or building material from Australia to the USA are high. Such costs may make shipping of boats or part inventories infeasible but that can be worked around is not known yet. The attached photos show the boat in its unfinished form at the trial launch. The engine is not equipped with final controls and is a larger size with much more weight than the 70hp specified. This engine is a larger than recommended size as that is what John had at the time. Performance is expected to be good with the recommended engines up to the Yamaha 70hp model. Yamaha outboards from 50hp to 70hp all have the same displacement although the 70hp will provide the best high end speed. In case some people have wondered what is going on with Bluejackets, this is the latest. Plan sales and building is moving along, although at 88, I have started slowing down on all facets of boating. There have been several inquiries about whether a Bluejacket can be built in Aluminum. My answer has always been that a BJ can certainly be built in aluminum but I am not in a position to do detail design and manufacturing in that medium. Quite a few aluminum boats have and are being built in the Pacific Northwest and are used mostly for fishing. None of these boats are, to my knowledge, optimum for cruising, which is a Bluejackets stock in trade. Weight of aluminum is a lot greater per unit of volume than wood which is the main reason that attempts to use other materials have not been pursued to a good conclusion. Weight of the boat and resultant performance advantages of light weight was the driving force behind many decisions in the Bluejacket design. Earlier this year, a builder of aluminum boats in Melbourne, South Australia contacted me about the possibility of using aluminum for 100% of the boat structure. After considerable discussion of what would be involved and by his enthusiasm for the project, work was started on evaluating whether a Bluejacket could gain the benefits of non-perishable material and rugged aluminum structure while retaining its better qualities of performance of the wooden model. Of course, the benefit of an ability to buy a commercially built Bluejacket from a quantity builder was also a main factor. How well this is accomplished is a bit unclear but the prospects look good. While I did do some work on this project, the main effort has been from John Pontiflex who owns and operates Plate Alloy Australia Pty Ltd in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. He builds a fairly large range of aluminum boats that are used mainly for fishing, either commercially or privately. Some modification of structural parts of the wooden Bluejacket was required to utilize aluminum but the design was followed very closely. He says that cruising boats are not a big item in Australia at this point and none that approximate a Bluejacket are available. Therefore a commercially available aluminum Bluejacket may well be a viable offering for Plate Alloy. He also teaches aluminum boatbuilding and the welding techniques necessary to make a good job in one week (or so) courses in various areas of Australia. CNC kits can then be a large part of Plate Alloy’s offerings. Cut files are, of course, available but legal requirements safeguarding their use by those other than Plate Alloy will be required. Shipping costs of ether boats or building material from Australia to the USA are high. Such costs may make shipping of boats or part inventories infeasible but that can be worked around is not known yet. The attached photos show the boat in its unfinished form at the trial launch. The engine is not equipped with final controls and is a larger size with much more weight than the 70hp specified. This engine is a larger than recommended size as that is what John had at the time. Performance is expected to be good with the recommended engines up to the Yamaha 70hp model. Yamaha outboards from 50hp to 70hp all have the same displacement although the 70hp will provide the best high end speed. The video does not work for me as yet.
  7. 1 point
    Great work Lenm and nice looking console ! Karnic 1851 boats have a center console that can easily accommodate a person under it when opened from the front side . Maybe you can do some google search about it. The front seat of the console can be opened forward with part of the flooring with it
  8. 1 point
    Looking very nice Lenm. It really starts to look like something when those gunwhales start coming into play. I am just waiting on my gastank before i can get the console in seems to be taking the guy a while
  9. 1 point
    Hi Steve, your boat looks great, sorry you couldn’t make the Messabout, hope to see it and you at next year. The pump is a Johnson Pump F4B-11 Ski Boat Ultra Ballast Pump. It has worked fine for 4 years now. I put the inlet in the centerboard trunk, and it has worked good, except when you pinstripe with the centerboard, mud gets in the tank and it is a PIA to clean the tank out. It is terribly noisy if you mount it directly to a bulkhead, turns the boat into a sounding rod, I used some Lord brand rubber mounts on my second iteration, better. I used pvc on Southern Express, but if I were doing it again I think the PEX would flow better. A perfect time to use the ballast pump as a cockpit wash down pump and water ballon filler with a simple 3 way valve.
  10. 1 point
    Any optimism of getting another sail is officially over. So I'm working on a few details. I had just laid my bunk storage lids under the cushions, but that has proven unacceptable. They mostly stayed in place, but not always. I was looking for an alternative to using piano hinge, but I couldn't figure anything else, so last night I cut piano hinge into suitable lengths and ground the sharp corners with a pedestal grinder. I bought some 1/4" long SS screws off Amazon because out local hardware store only carried 3/8 and even though I've spent a fortune weren't too keen on special ordering for me. Ever since they became and ACE hardware store it's been straight downhill. Oh well. Tonight I'll screw them all down. I got the depth sounder to install and I need to show you all the nice little drawer I put in under the companionway that holds my GPS and assorted stuff I need easy access too. Now, if Jay is reading this, I need more info on your two-way pump. You texted me pics of the install about 4 years ago which I somehow lost. I am sort of a Luddite, but I've conceded a pump would be nice for filling/un-filling the ballast tank.
  11. 1 point
    And that is all the pieces from the kit! Everything that came from the CNC machine (except centerboard and rudder parts) is now assembled. It felt like another milestone passed. Almost done, right? ... I hear snickering ... Checking inventory of mask filters because I know I will be spending much time with sanders and epoxy coating.
  12. 1 point
    Thanks Alan. That helps. After a week working on the transom framing it's coming together into the shape of a boat. Yes, I can get it out of the room. 😁 I know that because we stitched it up outside and then carried it inside to do the tack-welds.
  13. 1 point
    Finishing off Ocracoke Jnr whilst waiting for epoxy to dry on Snr:-) Planked her with 3mm h80 foam and sheathed with 4oz aerialite surfboard glass. Just need to finish the inside and ready for fairing. I actually have a scale outboard for it as well which runs!
  14. 1 point
    Here is the keel batten in all of her bulk. Now its time to fair her and the stem for the strips.


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