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  1. Yesterday
  2. To continue the slaughter of the language, it snew 4' in October by us. And our kids experienced exactly 1 snow day during their entire school careers, when the power was shut down and the heat wouldn't come up. Life at 8000'+ in a ski resort (Vail). 😉 But I grew up in upstate NY, and have been in NH the last few weeks helping my folks out, and there really is no cold like Northeast cold. In CO it's usually dry, bright and sunny even when we have many feet of snow underfoot - here it's bare at the moment but that humid, frozen wind just cuts right through you. So Steve, the end of your season makes sense. May it resume on time next year.
  3. Rick, CS15 and CS17 form drag is identical and we're moving below hull speed so my guess is it will be all about wetted surface area. I think you might to 3.5 knots. In any case I'm sure it will be faster than you can row. Chuck has an excellent point about these batteries. You use all their energy than boom, they're dead. I think two batteries makes sense and am considering adding a second identical battery as reserve. We'll see what Santa thinks about it.
  4. Where I live, that much Sneaux would have schools closed for a week !
  5. Storms have a history of being very severe on the banks. Past storms have washed away people, boats, and homes. After one such storm back around 1900, Bardon Inlet was washed open, and many homes washed away. Remaining folks packed up their houses and moved them to Harker's Island. i wonder when the next BIG ONE is coming?
  6. Gosh, Justin, she looks REAL good. Kinda makes some of the rest of us feel inadequate. You're doing an OUTSTANDING job!
  7. A LIPO battery continues to put out full, or almost full power until it is discharged. Also, touching terminals together by accident is VERY exciting. INSTANT discharge.
  8. Very!!!! clean neat looking work! kind of unusual to see, but very nice!!!!
  9. You call that snow? Pfft. But gorgeous boat, nice flick, *really* nice speeds. Congrats. 😉
  10. Completely off-topic, but inspirational nevertheless: https://www.nytimes.com/2019/11/13/us/hurricane-dorian-cows.html
  11. Last week
  12. Ok, the frame is almost ready to go in, along with the central seat. Any tips for how I can align the seat properly with the keel? I’m thinking of epoxying it down first and then cutting the centerboard slot later, but I want to make sure everything winds up in the right spot. Second question: what’s a good way go about cutting out the limber holes that pass through the seat and frame? Do one first (probably the seat) and then trace onto the frame. That’s what’s making the most sense to me, at the moment.
  13. Received a quick response from the EP Carry mfg; "Yes, any 24v battery with the same bolt-on type terminals as our K2 Energy batteries have will work with EP Carry. You simply need to order an additional connector cable for $70. That can be ordered via mail or phone. And yes, the EP Carry motor can run continuously without any performance issues." If battery connections the same, and you want to use a larger battery, may be able to order motor at lower cost without the smaller battery (or keep it for back-up). Would have to do our own testing for range with other size LiPO batteries, unless we can find some on the web. Rick
  14. In case some people have wondered what is going on with Bluejackets, this is the latest. Plan sales and building is moving along, although at 88, I have started slowing down on all facets of boating. There have been several inquiries about whether a Bluejacket can be built in Aluminum. My answer has always been that a BJ can certainly be built in aluminum but I am not in a position to do detail design and manufacturing in that medium. Quite a few aluminum boats have and are being built in the Pacific Northwest and are used mostly for fishing. None of these boats are, to my knowledge, optimum for cruising, which is a Bluejackets stock in trade. Weight of aluminum is a lot greater per unit of volume than wood which is the main reason that attempts to use other materials have not been pursued to a good conclusion. Weight of the boat and resultant performance advantages of light weight was the driving force behind many decisions in the Bluejacket design. Earlier this year, a builder of aluminum boats in Melbourne, South Australia contacted me about the possibility of using aluminum for 100% of the boat structure. After considerable discussion of what would be involved and by his enthusiasm for the project, work was started on evaluating whether a Bluejacket could gain the benefits of non-perishable material and rugged aluminum structure while retaining its better qualities of performance of the wooden model. Of course, the benefit of an ability to buy a commercially built Bluejacket from a quantity builder was also a main factor. How well this is accomplished is a bit unclear but the prospects look good. While I did do some work on this project, the main effort has been from John Pontiflex who owns and operates Plate Alloy Australia Pty Ltd in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. He builds a fairly large range of aluminum boats that are used mainly for fishing, either commercially or privately. Some modification of structural parts of the wooden Bluejacket was required to utilize aluminum but the design was followed very closely. He says that cruising boats are not a big item in Australia at this point and none that approximate a Bluejacket are available. Therefore a commercially available aluminum Bluejacket may well be a viable offering for Plate Alloy. He also teaches aluminum boatbuilding and the welding techniques necessary to make a good job in one week (or so) courses in various areas of Australia. CNC kits can then be a large part of Plate Alloy’s offerings. Cut files are, of course, available but legal requirements safeguarding their use by those other than Plate Alloy will be required. Shipping costs of ether boats or building material from Australia to the USA are high. Such costs may make shipping of boats or part inventories infeasible but that can be worked around is not known yet. The attached photos show the boat in its unfinished form at the trial launch. The engine is not equipped with final controls and is a larger size with much more weight than the 70hp specified. This engine is a larger than recommended size as that is what John had at the time. Performance is expected to be good with the recommended engines up to the Yamaha 70hp model. Yamaha outboards from 50hp to 70hp all have the same displacement although the 70hp will provide the best high end speed. In case some people have wondered what is going on with Bluejackets, this is the latest. Plan sales and building is moving along, although at 88, I have started slowing down on all facets of boating. There have been several inquiries about whether a Bluejacket can be built in Aluminum. My answer has always been that a BJ can certainly be built in aluminum but I am not in a position to do detail design and manufacturing in that medium. Quite a few aluminum boats have and are being built in the Pacific Northwest and are used mostly for fishing. None of these boats are, to my knowledge, optimum for cruising, which is a Bluejackets stock in trade. Weight of aluminum is a lot greater per unit of volume than wood which is the main reason that attempts to use other materials have not been pursued to a good conclusion. Weight of the boat and resultant performance advantages of light weight was the driving force behind many decisions in the Bluejacket design. Earlier this year, a builder of aluminum boats in Melbourne, South Australia contacted me about the possibility of using aluminum for 100% of the boat structure. After considerable discussion of what would be involved and by his enthusiasm for the project, work was started on evaluating whether a Bluejacket could gain the benefits of non-perishable material and rugged aluminum structure while retaining its better qualities of performance of the wooden model. Of course, the benefit of an ability to buy a commercially built Bluejacket from a quantity builder was also a main factor. How well this is accomplished is a bit unclear but the prospects look good. While I did do some work on this project, the main effort has been from John Pontiflex who owns and operates Plate Alloy Australia Pty Ltd in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. He builds a fairly large range of aluminum boats that are used mainly for fishing, either commercially or privately. Some modification of structural parts of the wooden Bluejacket was required to utilize aluminum but the design was followed very closely. He says that cruising boats are not a big item in Australia at this point and none that approximate a Bluejacket are available. Therefore a commercially available aluminum Bluejacket may well be a viable offering for Plate Alloy. He also teaches aluminum boatbuilding and the welding techniques necessary to make a good job in one week (or so) courses in various areas of Australia. CNC kits can then be a large part of Plate Alloy’s offerings. Cut files are, of course, available but legal requirements safeguarding their use by those other than Plate Alloy will be required. Shipping costs of ether boats or building material from Australia to the USA are high. Such costs may make shipping of boats or part inventories infeasible but that can be worked around is not known yet. The attached photos show the boat in its unfinished form at the trial launch. The engine is not equipped with final controls and is a larger size with much more weight than the 70hp specified. This engine is a larger than recommended size as that is what John had at the time. Performance is expected to be good with the recommended engines up to the Yamaha 70hp model. Yamaha outboards from 50hp to 70hp all have the same displacement although the 70hp will provide the best high end speed. The video does not work for me as yet.
  15. Hi Steve, your boat looks great, sorry you couldn’t make the Messabout, hope to see it and you at next year. The pump is a Johnson Pump F4B-11 Ski Boat Ultra Ballast Pump. It has worked fine for 4 years now. I put the inlet in the centerboard trunk, and it has worked good, except when you pinstripe with the centerboard, mud gets in the tank and it is a PIA to clean the tank out. It is terribly noisy if you mount it directly to a bulkhead, turns the boat into a sounding rod, I used some Lord brand rubber mounts on my second iteration, better. I used pvc on Southern Express, but if I were doing it again I think the PEX would flow better. A perfect time to use the ballast pump as a cockpit wash down pump and water ballon filler with a simple 3 way valve.
  16. How far back does the casting platform go— to bulkhead #2, or back to amidships?
  17. Thank for the addition info Randy. Sounds pretty good. Should then push my CS15 maybe 3-3.5 and our Amanda even more under similar loads. Seems quite a bit of use off a 9+ ah battery, and i like that they're assembled here, hopefully with high quality cells. I emailed EP to see if a heavier 50 ah 24v LiPO (30#, $1K) battery can be used for extra range, and if they have a power cable that can be bolted to a general purpose LiPO battery, e.g. one from Battleborn or a like source instead of their battery. Maybe In your BH19. Will keep all posted as I learn more. Rick
  18. Any optimism of getting another sail is officially over. So I'm working on a few details. I had just laid my bunk storage lids under the cushions, but that has proven unacceptable. They mostly stayed in place, but not always. I was looking for an alternative to using piano hinge, but I couldn't figure anything else, so last night I cut piano hinge into suitable lengths and ground the sharp corners with a pedestal grinder. I bought some 1/4" long SS screws off Amazon because out local hardware store only carried 3/8 and even though I've spent a fortune weren't too keen on special ordering for me. Ever since they became and ACE hardware store it's been straight downhill. Oh well. Tonight I'll screw them all down. I got the depth sounder to install and I need to show you all the nice little drawer I put in under the companionway that holds my GPS and assorted stuff I need easy access too. Now, if Jay is reading this, I need more info on your two-way pump. You texted me pics of the install about 4 years ago which I somehow lost. I am sort of a Luddite, but I've conceded a pump would be nice for filling/un-filling the ballast tank.
  19. Nice job! The gasket on the centerboard slot looks like a good idea, if just as a mud squeegy. My water intake on my CS20.3 for my ballast pump is in the centerboard trunk, it seems to work well till I just barely tapped the centerboard into that famous gray sticky clay, must have gathered a pound or so of mud which promptly glued my centerboard in the up position and filled my ballast tank with some really foul smelling sticky mud.
  20. As usual, the EC22 is hard to beat in a race.
  21. Thanks Riggs. now complete with anchor and navigation lights !
  22. All of these are outboard boats, but you may want to check them out anyway. From Jim Michalak: 1) Brucesboat and 2) Dorado. From the great Phil Bolger: 1) Slicer, 2) Fisherman's Launch, and 3) Sharpshooter. Have fun.
  23. The matt goes down against the fillet and wood.
  24. Build of hull #24 when you lay down the biaxial tape on cs 20 mk3 keel fillet I assume that the mat side goes down on the fillet. Please let me know if that is the proper application, I have never used this type of material before with a course weave on one side and os mat on the other, so just let me know mark
  25. Looking very good Lotus. I do like that radar arch in the fact that it comes down nice and simple like.
  26. Thanks Don, it was so “Restrained” it was only going where we wanted it to! A neighbor has cattle and a big JD tractor with a round bale spike on a front end loader, unloading will be easier but for the next few days it is resting comfortably in the trailer.
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