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AmosSwogger

Core Sound 20 Mark 3 Build - Chesapeake, VA

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Technically a few days is fine, though it depends on what you'll be priming over. If it's a mixed bag of fillers and various thicknesses of epoxy, I'd wait a week, but if everything was top coated with neat goo after the last fillers went down, a couple of days will be fine. The real issue is "print through" which is the fabric weave showing through (film thickness shrinkage) after it's painted. To prevent this, wait a week. If no fabrics were used or you know there's enough material over it (fillers, etc.) then a couple of days will do. Print though can be covered with several coats (and blocking) of high build primer.

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14 hours ago, PAR said:

Technically a few days is fine, though it depends on what you'll be priming over. If it's a mixed bag of fillers and various thicknesses of epoxy, I'd wait a week, but if everything was top coated with neat goo after the last fillers went down, a couple of days will be fine. The real issue is "print through" which is the fabric weave showing through (film thickness shrinkage) after it's painted. To prevent this, wait a week. If no fabrics were used or you know there's enough material over it (fillers, etc.) then a couple of days will do. Print though can be covered with several coats (and blocking) of high build primer.

 

Thank you for the reply.

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I haven't done a good job taking pictures, but I'll put up what I have.

 

Using scrap wood to check to check the fit before cutting into the good stuff . . .

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This Chechen wood is beautiful stuff; it will look even better after varnish.

 

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I'm going with two curved sliding hatches (copying Chicks work:D) . . . 

 

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I glued down the bottom half of the hatch tracks. About two o'clock in the morning I suddenly woke up and realized I forgot to cut the drain holes in the tracks. I know how I'm going to fix it (and it won't be that hard, but still, it is funny how these thoughts come to you in the middle of the night).

 

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You do quality work Amos. The finished vessel will be very satisfying. I really like your cabinet work and choice of timbers. 

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Need advice concerning fiberglassing the coamings:  should I fiberglass the entire inner and outer coaming with one continuous piece of fiberglass down to where the hull fiberglass stops, or should I just fiberglass the joints with tape? 

 

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Either way will do, though some argument could be made about the one piece sheathing, for abrasion resistance, in a high traffic area. It's possible you could get this single piece on, without cutting a dart or two, depending on the fabric weight, type and diameter of the corner radius. Yes, as with all fabrics going around an outside corner, you'll need a radius, to permit the 'glass to "lay down" neatly. I'd use a router with a healthy round over bit, cleaning it up with a belt sander or DA after, though there's other methods that work just fine too.

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I don't glass anything I don't have to.  I am a huge fan of light weight.  I might consider glassing the hull, or just bottom on a cruising boat.  Going fast is just too important.

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A piece of wood screwed to the base of your router will serve to adjust the angle. I don't use this adjustment, I just run the router a little shallow and clean up the short side with a sander. On that combing, I'd use the router on the top two edges, so it could ride flat and make a uniform depth cut on the top, where the eye will notice the most. After which, I'd clean it up with a sander on the vertical faces to match the upper corners.BYYB-415.thumb.jpg.0d9d5a7d2ac988e3e12c48a2e4ecf3f3.jpg

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Thanks Par, just what I was looking for. As for glassing I may just jump up and down on mine and if it doesn't crack I'm calling it good! I agree with Dave that I'm trying to keep this boat as light as possible. If I change my mind, it would be just to run a piece of tape on the outside where the cleat is. I am pretty sure I got that glued well, but not as sure as the cockpit side where there is tape under. 

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4 or 6 ounce fabric will not add very much weight (a handful of ounces), but will dramatically improve water tightness at the seams and abrasion resistance.

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If you make a paper pattern of the glass piece you need, you can pre-cut and pre-wet it on a piece of plastic, then apply the whole shebang. The paper will also help determine if the glass will drape around everything. ;)

 

I sheathed the vertical sides of the “house” on my boat this way with 4 oz glass. Same same with the bottom of the footwell and up the sides of it.

 

Cheap, clear shower curtain liners work well, and the finish they leave resembles that from peel ply, only smoother.

 

I have applied a six foot long, 30” wide piece of 4 oz glass this way, a few times. Alone. :)

 

Peace,

Robert

 

P.S. I may be tempted to glass it all, if only to provide the same substrate to take paint. It may weather differently on the bare ply as opposed to the glassed, and look odd later.

Happened on our Sneakeasy we are rescuing. No, not fir ply, but real imported fancy marine ply. It’s full of little sun checks on the bare wood parts.

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The advice on this forum is awesome; thank you for all the replies.  Not sure what I'm going to do yet; I have time to decide as I'm doing some final epoxy and paint work inside the cabin.

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I copied Chick's hatch design. 

 

The disadvantage of this hatch set up is that both hatches can't be fully open at the same time (although each can be halfway open).  Also the ventilation may not be as good as the hinged fwd. hatch that Graham has on his boat; his may catch more air (acting like a small wind scoop).

 

The advantage is the ability to open the forward hatch with the masts down in place for trailering.  There may also be a slight aesthetic advantage as these hatches are curved instead of flat.

 

I'm not putting in an electrical system (I'm sure I'll regret this later); right now I just want to finish the boat and get it into the water, so I really can't answer your solar panel question.  Chick, what are your thoughts?

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