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AmosSwogger

Core Sound 20 Mark 3 Build - Chesapeake, VA

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Are you commenting on my "all the way down"? If so, I mean that I feather the edge of the tape "all the way down" until it blends in with the wood. Of course, the tape weave has had a filler coat of poxy painted on to fill the weave. i extend this out onto the wood a couple of inches, or just epoxy coat all of the wood at the same time. Actually, I prefer to finish blending the tape before a couple of coats on the entire boat.

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No, Chick.  Your taped seam work has always impressed me.  I'm glad you shared your technique with us, because I have always wondered how you got your seams to look so good. (This is the truth!)  My comment was weird, and needs explaining.

 

Somehow, I found myself at the beginning of this entire 11 page thread.  It hit me funny that Amos' first boat is one of B&B's largest kits. So, it appears that Amos is starting at the top of the product line, and working his way down.  Sorry for the confusion, everyone.  Not sure what I was thinking.  

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27 minutes ago, Thrillsbe said:

No, Chick.  Your taped seam work has always impressed me.  I'm glad you shared your technique with us, because I have always wondered how you got your seams to look so good. (This is the truth!)  My comment was weird, and needs explaining.

 

Somehow, I found myself at the beginning of this entire 11 page thread.  It hit me funny that Amos' first boat is one of B&B's largest kits. So, it appears that Amos is starting at the top of the product line, and working his way down.  Sorry for the confusion, everyone.  Not sure what I was thinking.  

 

I wouldn't be able to build a boat like this without the help of this forum (and people like Jay who let me look at his boat in person).

 

I think my next build will be a Moccasin!

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My first boat built after MANY years was a Moccasin 2. (I built a few race boats way back in pre-history.) I sold it after awhile, but missed it and built another. Then sold it when we moved up to the mountains of North Carolina. Just finished a B&B motor canoe (I know y'all followed along.) and am considering yet another Moc 2. Miss Debbie would like the Moc 2. She enjoyed paddling with me, but also resting while I paddled.

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In general, how do you bed wood screws?  I need to screw some fittings to the tiller and will be screwing the hinges to the hatches soon (pictures coming soon).  I have drilled/filled/drilled every hole until now.

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Use a countersink on the mounting holes. This provides a place for the bedding to live, after you've tightened things down, instead of just squishing it all out, as it's tightened. It also forms a donut shaped gasket, that surrounds the fastener shank and squeezes it, as the fastener is tightened home. There's plenty of bedding choices (BoatLife, 3M, etc.). On these countersunk holes, I'm assuming you'll have a flat over it, in the form of a piece of hardware. 

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You're probably tired of kid pictures, but I just had to include a picture of my daughter breaking the sharp edges of the coaming with a spokeshave.

 

59824e18ad39a_20170801_204542(1).thumb.jpg.a781dda7dbc46a92c9bf3e3d3ce31eba.jpg

 

I drove out to Sommerton Ridge Hardwoods in Suffolk, VA, with the intention of picking up some Mahogany for the curved laminated cabin beams and other trim pieces, but saw some Chechen wood and fell in love with it.  It is very dense and hard (it almost sinks in water; it just barely floats).  The picture doesn't do it justice, it has a deep rich reddish color after it darkens.  It was expensive ($9.50 per board foot), but I didn't need much.  It is very, very heavy wood, and insect and rot resistant.

 

20170726_180652.jpg.1f7d84ef6f09aeabc032a13c3679bf2d.jpg

 

 

 

Here is the bent lamination glue up.  I'm indebted to Chick for the showing me the way with his build thread.

 

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This show the beams in place utilizing some alignment boards.

 

59824e50e864c_20170726_180553(1).jpg.59dbb07374ff4bac7d297a99980b1b00.jpg

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Your work is very precise Amos and will look great. Don't forget that if you join two sheets for the port and starboard sides of the cabin top you will probably want to use a butt strip on the underside to strengthen the join. If you do, you will need to rebate a slot along the centre-line in the top of each beam that is the width of the butt. You also need to give some thought to your carlines (fore and aft support beams) as to whether you are going to do halving joints or just butt shorter lengths in between the thwartship beams. Its easier to do the halving joints before final fitting. Of course, most of this is irrelevant if you are only butt joining the centre section and using a full sheet for the forard section. I just noticed the short fore and aft timber you have added on the centre-line. You are going to have a fine looking boat, and boats with good lines usually sail well!

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On 8/1/2017 at 9:40 PM, Drew said:

Your work is very precise Amos and will look great. Don't forget that if you join two sheets for the port and starboard sides of the cabin top you will probably want to use a butt strip on the underside to strengthen the join. If you do, you will need to rebate a slot along the centre-line in the top of each beam that is the width of the butt. You also need to give some thought to your carlines (fore and aft support beams) as to whether you are going to do halving joints or just butt shorter lengths in between the thwartship beams. Its easier to do the halving joints before final fitting. Of course, most of this is irrelevant if you are only butt joining the centre section and using a full sheet for the forard section. I just noticed the short fore and aft timber you have added on the centre-line. You are going to have a fine looking boat, and boats with good lines usually sail well!

 

Thanks for the tips Drew.

 

I'm thinking I won't need need carlines inside the cabin; the long rails that the sliding hatches slide in will give me good fore and aft strength.  I'm going to copy Chick's sliding hatch design (the Chick mod, that has a nice ring to it!).

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Great Job. I'll be following along myself as I'm considering doing a build myself at some point in the near future. I live in Great Bridge myself. 

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Very nice work Amos. You can not have too many kid pictures not if they are working on the boat, or sailing. Your laminate layup looks so clean.

I think laminated beams are one of the best combinations of epoxy and wood.

Beauty and function. Nature and Chemistry.

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5 hours ago, Joe Anderson said:

 You can not have too many kid pictures not if they are working on the boat, or sailing.

It is absolutely impossible.  Even in the threads that aren't of prime interest to me I look for the pictures, and these often stand out.

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29 minutes ago, Steve W said:

Amos, did your plans include offsets for the bending radius? How did you get that?

 

Alan e-mailed me some drawings with the some dimensions that helped; I used his numbers and the curves that I had on the hanging knees to extrapolate the curve I needed.  I can forward the e-mail to you if you PM me your e-mail address.

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