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AmosSwogger

Core Sound 20 Mark 3 Build - Chesapeake, VA

188 posts in this topic

I picked up a CS 20 Mark III kit recently and wanted to start a build thread.  I have been building solid wood furniture for some time now and needed a new challenge.  This will be my first boat.

 

She will be built in this shop:

 

shop_zpszzfc2y6g.jpg

 

 

I have three shop assistants; this is the oldest one.  The goal is to have them help with the build when they can and then teach them how to sail when the boat is finished.

 

Noelle-boatbuilding_zpsdsklkcey.jpg

 

 

I would add that anyone is welcome to come by the shop if they want to check out the kit.  As you probably gathered, I live in Chesapeake, VA.  For those that have posted builds and answered questions, I do want to thank you as I have read through all the build threads and have learned much.

 

My posting might be sporadic as work and life gets in the way but I do plan to keep the build updated with pictures.

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Welcome! I think you will find the CS .3 a delight to sail! The kit cutting accuracy is incredible. The the guys here are a wealth of knowledge!

Jay

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General Epoxy Question:  I have read that stearated sandpaper can cause issues with epoxy.  I have a lot of it and would like to use it as it clogs less than non-stearated sandpaper.  Would wiping the surface with denatured alcohol after sanding cause any issues with epoxy?  I tested this process with two scrap pieces of wood.  The bond seemed strong.

 

Anyone see a problem with using alcohol to clean off stearate residue?

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It depends on what the stearated coating actually is. Many are oil based dry films, so can tend to cause trouble with waterborne or based finishes. Recent advances in this technology has improved this process, so less issues, but I still don't trust them. Alcohol might remove it, then again, it might also smear it around. I've not had issue with stearated papers and epoxy, but have with waterborne paints. The best advice would be to contact the manufacturer of the specific paper you're using and ask their technical department.

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Welcome Amos! Nice to have another builder of Graham's Core Sound 20 Mk III. By-the-way, I couldn't open the photos you attached in initial posting.

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Amos.....I am excited to have another builder to compare notes with. I can't see your pictures either. Sometimes there is privacy settings on sites you need to tweak.

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Concerning the photos -- you might contact Frank and he can help with forum problems. Also, when you know the fix, you can edit your post, including its title. You can get your Hull # from Carla. I think they number them as hulls are started as opposed to sale of plans or kits.

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The pictures should be fixed now.  I signed out, viewed the forum as a guest, and the pictures showed up fine.

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I have gotten a lot of use out of the broadfork, I highly recommend one. 

 

I practiced applying fillets on some scrap wood; I'm glad I took the time to practice.  I made several mistakes (stirred/mixed the epoxy after I added filler, added too much filler, didn't have good way to apply it to the wood).  Once I worked the kinks out I filleted the inside of the centerboard case and was happy with the results.

 

20160423_191137_zpsnu86yvo8.jpg

 

I wet the wood with thin epoxy before applying the fillets.  Is this necessary?

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Many people find it surprising that California is an ag state, but we grow a lot of the food. I'm a farm boy, a real dumb hayseed, actually, and of the old stripe, so implements such as the broadfork are old hat to me.

I don't live on or farm anymore, though I am still a gentleman farmer, keeping just a bit too much under cultivation at any given time...

Peace be the journey of your first boat build... :)

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Welcome to the Group. Yes, applying a coat of epoxy, preferably warm so it is thinner, is very important. It can soak in the fibres and then when you apply your fillet the epoxy in each coat bonds and you have a stronger bond. Just don't have so much epoxy that it is basically a puddle on the plywood as this makes it hard to apply the fillet.

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I don't precoat before filleting and have never had a failure. i do tend to mix my filler pretty thin. Just thick enough that it will hold its shape. Check-out my pocedure for glassing the trunk in my build of Summer Breeze. It's on page-2: http://messing-about.com/forums/topic/9480-core-sound-17-mk-3-summer-breeze/page-2

 

Glad to have you on the forum.

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I'm with Chick. When you get past that sweet point where it's laying on the workbench and everything is simple to the laying on your side jamming goo in a crack, your standards diminish. As it all is going to be covered by cloth or tape, I see no major point as long as your goo is still a bit wet.

 

Free advice.....the module you are about to build is pretty darn big. In my shop it took up a lot of room. I went by the manual and built the cradle and started stitching the hull panels as shown. In retrospect, I wish I had finished the module first. The hull just sat there while I worked on the module taking up space in my shop and you can't do much until you have the module. And when you make stringers, don't underestimate what you need. It's a lot. Jay warned me about this and he was right.

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Right Steve. Check back on the discussion in my build about the module. It is MUCH easier to complete it and fillet and glass it while it is "on the floor" you can flip it any way that is convenient to glass the different surfaces. Be sure to glass the hull where the module will sit. And "scuff" the areas that will have the glass tape to bond it down to the hull.

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Great advice.  I did go back and read through build threads.  Thanks for all the work you guy put into this forum; it is a great resource.

I will take your advice and build the module before building the cradle.

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Chick, I have a workbench made from a solid core door. It's flat as can be. It was perfect for making the module. I glued up the module with it on it's side wit the two floors placed in it with packing tape on the seems to prevent them sticking. Once it was solid, I took out the floors and glassed the water tanks. I did this by filleting the bottom of the stringers and all joints. This allowed me to wrap the glass up over the stringers easily. I did get a couple of air bubbles which I used a heat gun before they were fully cured to squeeze out the air and press back down. With gravity to assist I did one side, flipped the module on it's other side and once the sides were done, I did for and aft of each tank. After trimming the overhang with a knife, I coated the bottom of the module good with clear epoxy to let the endgrain soak it up. After installing the module, I took Grahams advice and filled all the nooks and crannies in the top with epoxy. I'm 99.99999 % she's going to be water tight and rot resistant.

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