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An other OC20 build !!

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Thanks smccormick,

 

The " dingy " is just 4.5 ft . There will be a glass top resting on all 3 seats and is going to be used as a coffee table !

 

At this time being I have no intention to keep the oc on a mooring , she will be trailered back home . My location is 5 minutes away from the slipway

 

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Last weekend was busy fabricating the lifting strakes or splash rails . After getting all the measurements of width height and deadrise angle for every 10" of the strake, I transferred these measurement on to an angled aluminium strip , trimmed out the markings and therefore this aluminium strip became a mold (plug) of the strake itself !

All I had to do than is fill the mold with thickened epoxy , separate the cured epoxy strake from the mold and glue them onto the hull !

 

This way was much more easier to do than I thought :D

 

As you can notice if photo 1 the aluminium L strip was covered with plastic  tape so that the epoxy will not bond to the strip , in fact when cured it came out very easily ( photo 2 )

 

 

Hope that this will information will help someone out there because my impressions where that fabricating the strakes on to a modifies deadried hull is one of the hardest things to do !!

 

 

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Yes this is very helpful information. Unfortunately, like Tim, we went thru the pain of cutting them from timber. I have a feeling that you will be pressed for finer details of your method by those also facing this task. Great work as always.

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Hi guys, what do you think about this fairing method to get a smooth perfect finish ?

 

First apply thickened epoxy (407) with a grooved  trawler ( pic 1)  , than long board sand until it's almost straight   ( ie some of the resin grooves had disappeared ) pic2, than repaste thickened epoxy with a straight edge trawler to fill the remaining grooves . 

 

I think this method saves a lot of sanding fatigue and also lots of epoxy material too . Basically you're sanding only the upper point of the grooves on most parts and not the whole area to get it leveled !!  

 

Any ideas and comments ??

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This method is well known, but isn't light, nor fast. You'll apply twice as much, maybe considerably more fairing compound as normal methods and you'll spend more time sanding too, because you have to do everything twice. It is good for novices, as it's easier to identify lows and highs, but it adds a thin layer of fairing compound to the hull which ideally is sanded away, except in the low spots. In reality, most just leave a continuous coating of thickened goo all over and bring the lows up to the slightly knocked down highs.

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I've considered trying that method too, particularly around the areas where you are blending glass overlaps.  Just sanding off peaks in the application should produce much less work and less material usage in that area.  Possibly using smaller v-grooves in the field.  In the end I was worried about secondary bond strength in the unsanded valleys so I've never tried it.

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One way or the other, you will need to fair that hull, which has some curves on it. The bottom not so much.. Its one thing if you think you can get by with one layer that will create a fair surface.  But the notch method saves you a load of work when doing your initial fairing, along with materials.  Then when you go back and apply the second layer onto the notch layer and then sand, the notch layer will actually show if you down thru the new layer and tell you how deep you have gone and if you end up with some low or high spots.

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I used the notched trowel method on the bottom and seems to work fine , but lots and lots of sanding !! Decided to go for ' normal ' methods on the sides using a 3ft long aluminium trowel ( ruler) to smooth the fairing compound  .

 

One of the mistakes I done on the bottom was  building the splash rails before fairing , that made it more difficult for  long board sanding 

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The notched trowel method is only used where there is a big  hole in the fairing that you need to fill.  Never all over the whole boat. It prints through the paint horribly and you will see  it  forever.  You could do it on the bottom, but you really aren't saving yourself any work. There is no shortcut way to get these hulls fair. It takes strong backs and weak minds. Break the project of fairing into sections. Smaller elephants are easier to eat than big ones. 

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Looking really good Lotus! 

I wish I had such progress to report on.

 

33 minutes ago, Tarbaby said:

The notched trowel method is only used where there is a big  hole in the fairing that you need to fill.  Never all over the whole boat. It prints through the paint horribly and you will see  it  forever.  You could do it on the bottom, but you really aren't saving yourself any work. There is no shortcut way to get these hulls fair. It takes strong backs and weak minds. Break the project of fairing into sections. Smaller elephants are easier to eat than big ones. 

 

 I like the tip re breaking into sections.  At least if feels like you are getting somewhere when you can see the results in a particular section.

 

I have never faired a boat before, however I have done heaps of epoxy windsurfers, and in recent times, we have been faring them by 'wet' sanding.

Mostly to cut down on the terrible dust and stop sandpaper from clogging. Also seems to 'cut' a bit better.

I use mini long board with sanding belt for the sandpaper.  They last forever.  Use the usual 'guide' coat as well to spot the highs/lows.

Could this method be on a boat?  

At this stage of the project, I wouldn't think waterproofing should be of a concern?

I.e. a light spray of water.

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Sanding and more sanding :unsure:

 

Lenm I like the idea of wet sanding . I am using 3ft long boards ( one rigid , one flexible or less rigid ) and with wet sanding these are much more easier to push and pull !!

 

Yesterday morning I rolled and tip a coat of clear epoxy to get the side gloss , but again more points to fill and sand :(20170811_191458.thumb.jpg.9a89d34619c9816438d3884cb0e6aa44.jpg

 

 

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That finish is really starting to look very good sir B) gonna need sunglasses to check it soon 

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Almost forgot to form 2 flatpads for trim tabs !! 

 

Was thinking of 18 x 9 " bennett hydraulic trimtabs and maybe will go for the auto tab control ;)

 

 

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