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Blkskmr

Core Sound 17 Mkiii hull 6: Avocet

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Despite all the warnings and instructions  I did not get centerboard well straight.  Centerboard goes in, up and down fine.  So no need to crank up the chain saw.   Should be interesting to see what effect that has.  We used a silicone wine stopper for our bumper

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80 grit is pretty aggressive. I'm usually using 100 or 120 on initial primer knock down.

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Thank you both.  The bottom paint calls for 80 grit prep. I have plenty of 120. Will give that a try. Thank you for suggestion.  I have had a two week blitz on the boat and am kind of worn out. So, the sanding will be less than aggressive.

 

The rub rail is, I hate to admit it, just 1 x 2 from Lowes, scarfed together. This is a totally ignorant statement on my part, but it was whitish wood with minimal knots, fairly straight. I figure as long as it bends OK, absorbs the epoxy OK, once encapsulated, it will be impermeable.  I know I should pay more attention to these details. I expect there will be repercussions later. Mine will be the test boat for less than optimal decision making. 

 I put a quarter round on the corners. It is pretty beefy but we tend to be less than gentle with docks. It made a nice hand hold when flipping the boat.

 

Best Regards

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What type of "bottom paint" - anti-foul? 

 

The white wood from Lowe's is usually white pine, but it depends on what area of the country you're in, as it can be spruce and fir too. Up north, along the Canadian boarder, you'll get spruce, while out west, it's usually fir.

 

None of these make great rub rails, unless protected by something, like a metal half oval. Without some protection, they'll dent fairly easily, but with a plastic strip or metal half oval, it'll hold up better.

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As for paints, this time I am trying the Total Boat from Jamestown Distributors. The bottom paint is the JD Select. Barrier coat is their 2 part epoxy Primer.  I will use their topside paint  Wet Edge for decks then I have two new unused cans of Interlux Brightsides for the sides of the hull.  It is all an experiment. 

 

The holes in the bow are for the anchor locker.  Mine are probably larger than required.  They look more like nostrils.  They are at the low point of locker and should drain well.. 

 

I need to get some info on where to get stainless protective strips. 

 

Regards 

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The Total Boat stuff from JamesTown is a rebadged product line. Their bottom paint is a Flexabar product and their topside paint (WetEdge) is Camger Coatings Systems, both with a JamesTown label on it. Why do you think you need an ablative bottom paint?

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I saw an orange tabby in your shop -- and wondered how my "Lucy" got there. But upon checking, she's nearby sleeping. You must have her twin.

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I hate to have to correct you both, but Lucy is the kitten I found hiding in my kayak during a hurricane.

As far as I'm concerned, if the centerboard goes up and down fine, the trunk is straight. :)

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In reference to the bottom paint, there are times I will leave boat in the water for a week or so.  I did that once with a skiff that I built and within a few days there was grunge growing and by the end of the week some baby animals with shells stuck to the boat.  I am not sure what they were.  Also it  had blisters.  So this time I am going belts and braces.  Barrier coat and bottom paint.   The choice of the ablative, I hate to admit, was on price. It was the least expensive.  It was the lowest tech they had.  I figured I really did not need something good. Also they pay the freight on their branded product.  So for it has worked well.  I will post photo of finished bottom tomorrow. 

 

The Orange cat is Anthony aka Tony aka  Pinky.   He liked the boat better when it was upright.  There are epoxy cat prints in the cock pit.  They will remain. 

 

By they way  any thoughts on outboard motor mounts and motors? Do I need a long shaft or will a regular 2hp be OK. 

 

Regards and Thank you.

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By they way  any thoughts on outboard motor mounts and motors? Do I need a long shaft or will a regular 2hp be OK. 

 

I use a 2.5 hp, 4 stroke Suzuki. I had it on my CS-20 Mk-2 and it was plenty. It is a short shaft. I notched the transom a couple of inches to get the prop below the water line, and built a "well" to give room for the clamps. More pictures and discussion here: http://messing-about.com/forums/topic/9480-core-sound-17-mk-3-summer-breeze/page-5

 

By-the-way, a cat is appropriate to these boats. after all, they are called CAT ketches after all.

 

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Here's a similar approach for the same engine on the transom of "Chessie," a CS20.3:

http://messing-about.com/forums/topic/9758-motor-mount-suzuki-25-cs203-4/

The CS20.3 has a forward tilt to the transom. To keep the motor shaft perpendicular to the waterline and allow for reversing rotation, I needed to mount the motor a couple of inches aft of the transom top edge and build-in an opposite tilt [on the bracket]. Note also that the Suziki shaft already has a built-in ~ 5 degree tilt (at its minimum tilt setting) which about doubled the transom "tilt" problem. When mounted, the engine's "cavitation" plate is just below the boats bottom. I designed my bracket so that it can be removed.

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Remember that motors under about 4 hp do not have reverse gears. They rotate the motors 180 degrees for reverse. The exhaust sweeps aft but sweeps forward when reversing which can foul the transom/ bottom. The long shaft extension fits below the exhaust which means that it will not solve the problem. The short shaft motor will stow inside the cockpit locker.

 

The 2.5 Suzuki will fit on the CS17 mk3 transom as Chick and I have done but it is a delicate balance between between the exhaust clearing the bottom of the boat and the underside of the motor clearing the top of the transom.

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The white wood from Lowe's is usually white pine, but it depends on what area of the country you're in, as it can be spruce and fir too. Up north, along the Canadian boarder, you'll get spruce, while out west, it's usually fir.

 

None of these make great rub rails, unless protected by something, like a metal half oval. Without some protection, they'll dent fairly easily, but with a plastic strip or metal half oval, it'll hold up better.

 

The "white lumber" Lowes sells around Milwaukee is soft and punky.  It might technically be some sort of spruce or fir, but I would not rely on it for much strength or to hold its shape over time.  It appears to be very rapid growth stuff, probably pulled from a pulp harvest.  So, to echo PAR's key point, that "white" stuff appears to vary greatly around the country and you need to evaluate accordingly.  The big box stores around here do have some legit doug fir, sold as such, although it's often knotty or curved.  (I found one piece with a natural curve that I was considering using for the inner keel at one point, no bending-in required!)  They have some decent "select pine" at times, too, although the pieces I bought most recently were imported from New Zealand. 

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On the paint, I used the Jamestown WetEdge enamel and thought it worked very nicely, comparable to Interlux enamel at much lower price.  Jamestown has stainless halfround (expensive) and brass halfround (less so).  Get them when they have free shipping on orders over $50.

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Chick, Graham, Pete, and Paul, 

 

Thank you for the quick replies.  For better the or worse the U.W.W. ( unidentified white wood)  is installed. I think the worst that can happen is that it can get ugly fast as I run into stuff. I guess I could try to avoid that.

 

As for the motor and mount, I have reviewed several times what Chick and Graham have done and admire it.  It is a little late for that now.  Also without a drawing to follow I would be lost.  Oars are looking good.  But I will need a motor at some time.  I have reinforced the transom on the right side. I will have to use an external mount, which is ugly but functional.  I was hoping one of you had used one that was OK. 

 

Finally,  I went to drill holes in the rudder to day for the pintles.  The specified RL 390 S &L are not wide enough for the rudder.  I looked them up.  They are for 1" wide rudder.  It looks like they should have been the RL 390 SW & SL.   Is this correct? Or am I missing something. 

 

Thank you

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