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Blkskmr

Core Sound 17 Mkiii hull 6: Avocet

117 posts in this topic

Good morning.  I need to ask for some assistance on two items. 

 

1) I am reaching the point of rolling the boat to glass the bottom. I have seen some elegant garage gantry work, but don't think I can go that route.  Please tell me what you have done that has worked. 

 

2) Water line: How did you decide where to place it, and what method did you use. I don't want it to look like a N.C. rural road divider line. 

 

Best Regard and thank you in advance for any help you can provide 

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Ref. waterline, Graham should provide measurements for the waterline. I'll need them too. He has a really cool method to tape off the boot top. He demonstrated it a couple of years ago at his messabout. If we beg him, maybe he and Alan will make a video of the procedure and post it on his website.

 

I had the same situation as you for turning Summer Breeze. I had three friends come over and the four of us just picked it up and turned it over. It was no big deal. An offer of sweet tea or soda and a hot dog lunch brought them running. (Folks are "easy" up here---they work for any old snack.)

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The water line is in your plans unless you build from a kit with no drawings. If you have plans find the line and transfer it to the boat. If not,you will have to wait for Graham to get back. I normally locate the line in the bow and stern then pull a string inside with a bubble level to level the boat. On the outside I use a cheap laser on camera tripod to shoot series of dots/marks connecting the two measurements. To have the water line marked off -inside and out- is - to my mind - fairly critical to a succesful build. Plumb and level the boat and every piece wood you put in will have an easily discernible relationship to the water line. As for the boot stripe I can walk you through it but you have a long way to go on that one. Like Chick says perhaps Alan will post a video on that. Good luck PeterP

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The reason I like Grahams method is that the boat doesn't have to be level, you don't need a laser level, or have to mark dots. i wonder if anyone shot a video when G. did that demo?

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Chick, I agree with you on the bootstripe. My point was simply to say that having the boat plumb and level makes for much easier fitting out. He is nowhere near ready for boot stripe. Graham's method is the way I do mine and you are right again - no laser is necessary. All you need is a roll of tape and handfull of 1x2 sticks or some such. Cheers PeterP

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Thank you all for the quick response.   First step is to roll the boat and get it glassed.  The water line  is one of those concerns I would like to resolve so I can stop thinking about it at night. Once again.  Thank you

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Don't sweat it friend. Glassing the boat will keep you busy for a while. Then you need to fill and sand and fill and sand and fill and sand....Then it'll be painting time. You will need to figure out the water line to do the bootstripe but even if Graham and Alan should vanish from this earth there is a good and fool proof way to establish the waterline. Prime the boat and let it float in a placid body of water. Pull it out after a couple of hours and there she be. Never fails. But they will be back long before you need it. Good luck PeterP

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I say now is the best time to mark the waterline on the bare plywood. Make it permanent into the wood. Press hard with a carpenter's pencil. It will show thru the epoxy and fiberglass. If your floor is level and the cradle & boat also level it's fairly easy. Just make a vertical stand the top of which is at the waterline height and move it around the boat, marking the hull, then "connect the dots" (or little dashes). Strike the line hard onto the wood. Put a little paste or bee's wax under the stand.

For the top of a parallel boot add a block (off of a 2 x 4) for a 3.5" boot -- and strike another line. But Graham's boots have an attractive taper to them. If you want that, it's a bit more tricky and Graham's method is a beauty. But by either method, I'd do it on the bare wood.

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Rolling over: I second Chick's method.  Get a few friends, or a gymnast nephew and brother in law, and pick it up and over she goes.  It's not as heavy as it looks.  Make sure you have a place to put it once flipped.

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A good looking boot top, especially on a boat with warp in the bottom, is near a ratio of 6 at the bow, 2 1/2  to 3 midships and 4 at the stern.  This looks more balanced when viewed from the beam.  Straight at the bottom, of course.  Since its near impossible to maintain a small boat level fore and aft, having the bow a bit higher than the stern is best.

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Pete M.  

   That makes sense to me.  I don't have the exact measurements for the water line but can mock up the stand you suggested. Will do so and reply with photos. 

Once again. Thank you all. 

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Pete, et all, 

 

Thank you for the input. My floor is level.  The cradle is level, and the boat is level.  I am building a kit. I do not have a detailed drawing.  But the sketch I do have seems to show the water line intersecting with the corner of the transom.  I used this as my reference height. The photos explain what I did.  Where the hull breaks toward the bow  there is an optical illusion that makes the line look as if it drops.  It does not drop.  Once the stand was built it took me about 20 minutes to do one line. If the crowd seems to think this is correct then I will buy a cheep pizza wheel and indent the line into the hull. 

 

I thought if this afterwards.  The boat boat is level side to side, but resting in the cradle, with the level on the seats in the cockpit, the bow is slightly higher.  The bubble on the level is perhaps split by the forward line on the level.  Do I need to shim the transom so the seats in the cockpit are level, or is it OK to work with the boat resting in the cradle( as intended)  with the bow up slightly? 

 

I look forward to the feed-back. 

 

Regards 

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Hate to do this to you but you will not know if your boat is level until you establish the water line. That is your number one reference line. Everything you put in the boat is related to it one way or another. You can build a boat without knowing where it will be but if you screw up you will kick yourself for not being patiet. Think of it as waiting for tide. My advice is to flip the thing and glass it. Graham will be back long b4 you get that done. You could also try contacting Jay to see if he has the numbers you are looking for. PeterP

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Aren't the bunks parallel to the waterline? On a dead level wood shop floor and the hull on its design cradle -- my bunks and the forward locker top are also dead level. And the cockpit seats port-to-starboard are also level. However, the cockpit seats show about 1/4 bubble aftward slop. And the footwell sole slightly more slope.

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Pete, 

The observation of the slope of the seat and cockpit sole seems consistent with what I am seeing. I will check the berths.  If they are level then I am Ok in that respect. 

Thank you

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What I struggle with the most is that I know what I want accomplish with a specific task and what I want it to look like. The end result seems to be close, but not quite there. This I expect is due to a lack of aptitude, good technique, or patience. But despite the misses it looks remarkably like a boat. It has the requisite elements.  As long as no specific part is studied to long, at closer than 10 feet, it looks OK.  I have a kayak named Porto that goes left.  My biggest concern is that all the misses will add up to a boat that tracks like a blood hound on a hot scent.  Will post photos later. 

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Post flipped.  It took 4 of us with an assist from lifting points in ceiling to flip.  We will have 6 to 7 for the re-flip

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