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Jknight611

2.5 HP Suzuki

81 posts in this topic

For the record, modern automobiles are required to have fuel systems which are ethanol tolerant.   The durability testing is done with "normal" gasoline (E15).  I verified this with my colleagues still working in the automotive industry.  Now, if you have an old car, like our '86 VW Cabriolet "ice cream car", you should probably use only ethanol-free fuel.  

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What's everyone's opinion on the old Seagull outboards?  I just saw one on Craigslist, and it's in great shape (cosmetically, anyway).  I used to just laugh at them, but I now am more open minded, especially at 28#.

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What's the fuel mix on those things; 16:1?   I get the "evil eye" for using my 2007 (26lb) 3.5hp two stroke that burns 50:1 gas/oil fuel ratio.   I can only imagine the reaction the cloud of blue smoke from a Seagull would receive.   Of course, the old motor looks cool and if you don't run it the mileage and emissions are pretty good.  

     

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I've had 2 seagulls- the really simple ones with no clutch or recoil starters. They were dependable and hell for stout but crude. I had one on a 16' ply Great Pelican, and it seemed to go as fast towing a 20' inboard/outboard as lone boat! The thing that wouldn't work today is the starting procedure. The instructions said to press the brass button on top of the 'carb' until you see a sheen on the water. I say 'carb' because I was told by someone who knows that it isn't really a carburetor but a mixing valve, sort of like a model airplane motor. The 'shear pin' was a spring of about 3/16 wire that wound 3 or 4 turns around the prop shaft and had the ends turned out to engage the prop & shaft. If you get one be REAL careful not to hit anything- Heaven only knows where you could find another. If memory serves, the mix was 10 to 1. Especially since they are out of production, I don't think I would buy another.

 

Best regards

Alex

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More on the "oil-level" indicator.

 

I tried [again] to photo the oil-level indicator.  But I couldn't get the photo to show clearly the actual oil level.  So I sketched what I saw onto the relevant page in the owner's manual.  The shaft was vertical.  Here is my sketch:

 

image.thumb.jpeg.5a21c62744ba28fa8917dd7986d1aa23.jpeg

 

My opinion is that the oil-view window is useful only to alert [you] that oil is probably too low if it doesn't show AT ALL in the window.  If oil shows, then you're ok.

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Thanks, alexscott.  I'm also wary of buying British antiques. But all this talk of oil levels, hydro lock, and that extra 10# has got me reluctant to buy into modern technologies.

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I just looked at the old tool box I used to carry, and the fuel oil ratio is actually 25:1. If the blue smoke is not a deal breaker, a modern 2 stroke would probably give the light weight & reliability.

 

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Thanks, alexscott.  I'm also wary of buying British antiques. But all this talk of oil levels, hydro lock, and that extra 10# has got me reluctant to buy into modern technologies.

I live in the Appalachian foothills. Blue smoke is a way of life in these parts!

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OK Peter, my first one was a 74 and must have used 10:1. The second from the 80's used 25:1 as noted on the toolbox.

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Dare I admit this?  I'm actually going to play with putting a weedeater motor on the transom of the boat!  Sounds like a fun project, anyway.  As of April 14th, I'll be happily retired (again), and will have more time than money.  Check  it out!  

 

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WHAAT? I can't hear you!  Yeah, I know. I have a feeling that I'll use it as much as you use oars.  LOL

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I might change my mind about the seagull- I could put up with almost anything to avoid that chainsaw racket

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I hear you, alexscott.  (Haven't fired it up, yet.)  But here's the deal.  I'm the proud owner of an open sailboat.  I build her for day sailing and fishing.  Camp-cruising is a new concept for me, an experimental thing.  Not sure how much of it I'll even do.  For now, I'm trying to focus my spending where most of my activity is.  Currently, extended cruises aren't that big a factor.  The chainsaw motor seems like a cheap entry fee into the world of cruising.  If the bug bites me hard, I'll take the plunge on a "real" motor.

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Yessir. I

 notched the transom a bit to get room for the lower unit to clear the bottom when pivoting it around for reverse.

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