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Jknight611

2.5 HP Suzuki

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I've read this thread and many others pertaining to outboard motors.  My generalization of the whole topic is twofold:

 

1) Nobody is happy with their outboard motor --especially if it is four-stroke.

 

2) There seems to be no consensus on what works.

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Tfrei, I'm not sure what you're getting at, but most folks love their 4 strokes. No oil mixing, no smoke, more torque, better fuel use, etc. As to consensus, well you seem to have missed this as well. Though several brands are being employed and several different sizes too, the shaft length and output are pretty consistent. So, maybe you can further define your assumptions?

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I also love my 'Zuki 2.5 4-stroke, and have had no problems. One reason is that I use fuel stabilizer, fuel without alcohol, and run the fuel out of the carb. before storage. I've had it since early 2012.

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I defer to people with more experience than I.  

 

Maybe I am going off of my own experience with my Honda 2 hp 4 stroke.  Nothing but problems for me.  Using clean fuel with no alcohol, serviced twice by certified technicians, but still does not run consistently.  So, I may have been selectively reading things through the lens of my singular experience.  Thanks for your feedback. And I'll look into other brands.  Maybe the Suzuki 2.5 4 stroke?

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   I think the experience can vary from one motor to another of the same model.  You've had a bad experience with your Honda 2hp 4 stroke but I've had a very good experience with mine (the current one).  From my experience with previous motors it's very frustrating when you can't get it to work - Even with the help of pros.  My most frustrating outboard was another Honda 2hp 4 stroke that had been dunked under salt water (while cold and not running) for a matter of a minute or two and then flushed.  The flushing wasn't enough and eventually we had to abandon this previously dependable motor for a replacement. It is still in the shed in case I need spare parts for the new motor.

   I'm not saying that your motor has been abused the way my old motor was, I'm just saying that I've had bad experiences with a Honda 2 that was dunked in salt water and I've had good experiences with more than one Honda that had not been dunked in salt water.  Has your engine been through any trauma?

   Whether or not you know the complete history of your motor I think I share your pain in having to deal with a dead motor (I hate that frustration so much...)  My current project will have an electric inboard so I won't have to worry about the pain of dropping it into the water at the boat ramp again ;)

   Sails and paddles are so much less delicate...  And quieter.

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It is really hard not to be affected by experience, but 1 is a really small case study to base things on.  You will get some really good critiques here.  My Pete Culler long oars need to be shortened, but they are very reliable.

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I have a fair bit of experence with the smaller Hondas and it really depends on which model and it's age. The first generation of little Hondas were very reliable, then they make significant changes in 1998 (I think). This second generation of little Hondas were prone to debris contamination and emulsion tube cracking. You could clean out the fuel system and the carb, but it still would run like crap. The smallest piece of debris could clog the low speed jet holes in the emulsion tube and you need a magnifier to see them. The second major issue is the emulsion tube at the end of the main jet. Tiny cracks can develop at the end of the tube, often from the last few holes in the tube. These are really easy to overlook or even see with regular 20/20 vision. When I disassemble these carbs, the very first place I look is with a magnifying glass at the end and holes on the emulsion tube. 80% of the time, there's a crack (usually more than one) and the engine will run like crap, unless it's replaced. It's an easy fix, though you do need to be careful putting it in, but if done properly, solves the mysterious poor running situation. Lastly, the emulsion tube O ring can get easily crushed, pinched or distorted on these engines, so use care. When you buy the emulsion tube, it comes with a new O ring. Use it.

 

All engines, every single one have these "quirks" about them. Some break this or that, while others don't, but prefer to wear out this and that instead. Have your mechanic look at the emulsion tube(s) with a magnifying glass and I'll bet a hairline crack will be found. It's a $10 part on the little Honda, though complete carb disassembly is required.

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This is a very interesting thread on the new 4 stroke engines.  Yup, give me back my old Johnson 4 hp longshaft 2 cycle anyday.  I purchased a new 3.5 tohatsu for the CS 17 and it works fine, but as Paul said, it is prone to dirt, and debris getting stuck in the carb.  Best bet is just to learn how to clean it and make that part of the annual maintenance plan.  Additionally, I like to drain the gas out of the tank, run the carb dry, then put a few ounces NO Ethanol gas (from small engine repair shop), run it for a couple of minutes, then store it. This has minimized problems, and only takes a few minutes to do this.    

 

I think that the move to lower emissions, combined with the mandate to put ethanol in gas has been a disaster for small power equipment owners.  

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You guys kill me!  Everyone says "I love my Suzuki", and then go on to tell about all the hydro-lock problems you're having.  What sort of experience would it take for you to NOT like your 'zuki?

 

I would like to hear more about that new Yamaha 2.5.  Anybody?

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I now have the engine oil at the very minimum level, and watch it like a hawk on the 2.5 Suzuki. No problems since and I have reverted to carrying it in the laserette, tiller down with the carb dry, fuel valve off. Maybe my original problem was simply operator induced. Certainly not the first time!

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I do love my Suzuki and have never experienced any of the above issues. My motor is always stored on a stand or on the back of my boat and never in the horizontal position.

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you folks with the Honda 2's.......here is a carb drain screw that is accessible through a small slot in the lower cowl. Running the carb dry doesn't quite get all the gas out. If you are going to store it for a lengthy amount of time, just loosen this screw and the gas will all come out. You'll be surprised how much after you ran it "dry". I have a new Suzuki 2.5 sitting next to my CS20.3. Probably won't be used until 2018 at the rate I'm going. I've had very good luck with my Honda. I just hate how loud it is.

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My situation is that I will also use this motor with my Zodiac, when I go trailer camping.  When I do that, it'll ride in the back of the pick-up truck.  Vertical is rather difficult to accomplish there.  Guess I should look at two-strokes, but I don't want to.


And everybody knows that if you run the engine "dry", there's still fuel in the system.  Just sayin'.

 

I love my Edsel, too.  [sarcasm Font: ON]

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It just boggles my mind that you would love a motor that is so much trouble.  I know a man who had a Lexus.  The body controller (computer) crashed on him, and left him stranded.  A total loss.  So, what did he do? He turned around and bought a Camry.  If this had happened to him with a Cadillac, he'd buy Japanese, and be badmouthing GM.  Maybe this is similar.  I just have a hard time giving Suzuki my heard-earned money, and encourage them to give lousy service and a troublesome product.  Sorry.  Pet peave.  I'm done with my rant.

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Had a small engine mechanic tell me so.  There's always stuff it the bottom of the bowl, when the engine starves for fuel. The only way to guarantee that you don't get sludge and varnish deposits while storing an engine is to use fuel stabilizer.

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I have had my Zuki for a few years now and have never had a problem. I ALWAYS add fuel stabilizer when i first buy my gas. I ALWAYS use ethanol free gas. I ALWAYS shut off the fuel valve and run the gas "dry". I never thought about the fact that there is a bit of fuel left even then, but it hasn't been a problem for me. I also store the engine upright. Maybe because it is a 4-stroke and has no oil added, there is no sludge left in the itty-bitty amount of fuel left in the carb.

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