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Second layer of ply on the bottom, chine flats installed, fairing the aft topsides, fitting the shear clamp.  True to my normal process, I am spending a bunch of time with the clamp knowing how important the shape is to the appearance of the finished boat.

 

 

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Here's the project beginning to look very boaty.  First layer completed on the hull sides .  Had to celebrate but thought it would be sacrilegious to bring out the whisky so I fired up the blender for a couple of frozen mudslides.  Sat out on the west lawn (backyard) with wife and dad and basked in the success and alcohol.  I'll need to start shopping for my captains cap and a blue blazer soon.

 

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Here's the second layer started, just dry fitted.  Yes I'm doing double diagonal... and I know the B and B guys recommend Ashcroft but I just couldn't do it.  This is the way I learned and sometimes I'm slow to make a change.  The next one I will try Ashcroft.  

 

The first layer consumed 6.25 sheets with the quarter sheet being sourced from the bottom plating drop.  had .375 of a sheet left over that was not needed. The second layer is ~60 degrees from the first and seems to be laying out needing a bit less manipulation of the stock for optimum use in that the forth and subsequent planks (heading aft) were less than 48" long (actually 49", I'm using metric sheets that are ~98.375 long) to the middle of the miter. 

 

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Looks great so far. I have been looking at possibly building the 256, and I too was considering putting the planks double diagonal on the sides. One thing I'm curious about is the integrated bracket, do you have any pictures of the rear of the boat where this is visible?

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Looks great so far. I have been looking at possibly building the 256, and I too was considering putting the planks double diagonal on the sides. One thing I'm curious about is the integrated bracket, do you have any pictures of the rear of the boat where this is visible?

 

Just looked through my photos and I didn't have any before the bottom of the bracket was planked.  If you are really curious I am happy to shoot a couple from below to show the structure but it's really what is shown in the model on the BandB site.

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Looks great so far. I have been looking at possibly building the 256, and I too was considering putting the planks double diagonal on the sides. One thing I'm curious about is the integrated bracket, do you have any pictures of the rear of the boat where this is visible?

 

Just looked through my photos and I didn't have any before the bottom of the bracket was planked.  If you are really curious I am happy to shoot a couple from below to show the structure but it's really what is shown in the model on the BandB site.

 

 

No need to crawl under and take extra pictures, I'm sure you're working hard enough! 

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So I currently live in the Sacramento valley where the weather during the summer is HOT.  A cool day during the summer is low 90's and it's regularly above 100.  But it's a dry heat (for those who think that matters).  As you can guess, that temp affects epoxy cure time drastically.  I was hoping to take care of the large scale glassing before summer hit and I would have made it if not for some supply issues.  Back about a month ago I was about to start glassing when i found out my supplier was out of peel ply.  That took 10 days for restocking.  The day I received my material summer showed up.  Started glassing but it was just too hot for the epoxy package I had, so back to the supplier for some very slow hardener.  Hey that's 14 days out. 

 

A couple of these showed up yesterday at my supplier so I ran up.  Sloooowwww.

 

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So I have lost almost a month on my project waiting for materials.  A bit frustrating, but I'm moving ahead again today.

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Topsides fairing moving along, maybe 80% + there.  Of course, the conundrum is that if I assume the 80/20 rule I am only 20% done.  Therefore, I can never get further than 80% because when I do, I am at 20% and I will never finish.  Makes sense to me.

 

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Guest Chris Beebe

She looks good , night and day different. You are working hard. I have some more pics I will post tomorrow.Thanks,have a good night

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Topsides fairing moving along, maybe 80% + there.  Of course, the conundrum is that if I assume the 80/20 rule I am only 20% done.  Therefore, I can never get further than 80% because when I do, I am at 20% and I will never finish.  Makes sense to me.

 

The answer is 42.

 

We all face the dilemma of deciding when enough is enough concerning final fairing/finishing.  Keep going until you are happy.  I go for a "B" grade finish on the hull, and then add way too much bright work in an effort to disguise this. Not sure this really applies to a modern design like you are building though.

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Concentrate on getting really fair and smooth surfaces on those places light will reflect when sitting on the trailer. The forefoot of the bottom, just below the chines, the flared portions of the topsides and the edges. This are the places the eye is drawn to, when light reflects off the surface. Also pay attention to the edges, along the transom and the chines. Make the radius look consistent and the lines "sweet". These are the places the eye sees first and a bump or dip in a chine line stands out, a varying radius along the corner of a transom, etc., etc., etc. You can get real anal about this, but to be honest, 99% of the folks you'll meet, will never notice these inconsistencies, so you also might want to pick your poison, as there's lots more to do and worry about.

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Thanks for chiming in guys, I was beginning to wonder if anyone was reading this besides my dad.

 

When setting an expectation as to level of precision when doing anything, I always try to error on the side of excellence.  Not trying to say I'm some amazing craftsman, just that I will have to live with the end results and will regret taking shortcuts.  The reward of being finished will always be overshadowed by having to constantly look at a blemish that could have been remedied with a little patience.  I'll probably be working past where most reasonable people would have said enough.

 

Par, you are right on what we see first.  I keep staring at the transom corners wanting to put sandpaper to them so I can see the shape, but somewhere along the line I learned to fair the corners to a sharp edge and radius as a last operation.  It's worked for me over the years, but I so want to go at them.  Maybe because to me, it means I'm done.

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S(?),

Your hull is looking nice. I'm just down the 99 on the eastern rim of the valley, so I feel you on the weather. Why I am done working outside by 1 pm!

When my buddy and I used to make strip canoes we always started our day around 6 pm! Get the glass on when it's still hot, but getting cooler.

Of course, a canoe ain't all in it with a big old monster like you're building.

This boat is going to absolutely rock out here. And you are doing an excellent job.

Dang, but I love all the flare in that sucker! Them old Sound boys knew how to make a pretty boat.

I'm more of a Monterey boat guy, myself, if I were going to have a power boat...

Peace,

Robert

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All that sanding, before that first coat of paint/primer, seems to take forever.  I like PAR's advice about where to concentrate your effort.  Unfortunately, these are the most strenuous areas to sand.  She looks lovely.  Keep going!

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