Jump to content
Malwarebytes Endpoint Security
Advanced endpoint protection (affiliate link).
Drew

Aussie CS 20-3#5 "Dragonfly 2"

Recommended Posts

On 10/1/2017 at 11:51 AM, PAR said:

The best advice is to not get greedy and sail too close. Divided rigs by their nature prefer to sail lower. If you sail too high, about 40% of the boat's drive is working in the backwind of the main, so free her up, enjoy the speed and make an extra tack or two.

 

I knew this intellectually when I built my Lapwing, but it was still hard for me to accept that my new boat was not as weatherly as a sloop and I needed to modify my technique a little.  Sailing on a shallow salt pond with narrow channels and strong tidal currents in some of the channels, having to keep my board partially up and resetting the release cleat even so eventually got through to me that sailing a bit fat and keeping up a good speed works better than pinching in these boats.  Pinching is rarely a good idea, but the effects are exaggerated in a divided rig.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 A canting mizzen Dave. A cordless drill, some allthread and a curved track at the heel of the mast . . .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A tongue and cheek reply to Dave's observations on the cat ketch's pointing abilities, where I obviously should have been more clear. I made this upgrade on a conventional ketch of mine, just to see what would happen and I can nearly hang with a sloop and it's far better, than the traditionally proportioned fixed ketch rig. On small craft such as the Lapwing of Dave's, it's not a major revision, though does add some complication. I use a cordless drill to move mine, though originally used a 3 part tackle.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Would you like to enlarge on that thought PAR? Do you mean adjust the angle fore and aft or athwartships?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep, I've found the upper 2/3's of the mizzen provides effective drive to windward with the windward cant. Typically the mizzen is mostly blanketed, but if you can get it to peek out from behind the main a bit, she does much better. I get a total of 15 degrees of cant and more doesn't seem to help much, but this canoe body I'm using it on likes to sail flat anyway.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/1/2017 at 6:17 AM, Drew said:

As various people have said in the past, the Coresound flies when reaching and running, but I would love to hear any advice from experienced people (are you there Alan?) about getting the best performance upwind, especially close hauled. On my first attempts I have not been able to get her to point particularly high and still keep way on. If I close haul the sails too tight she just wallows without going anywhere fast. Suggestions guys?

 

Drew, 

 

The boat looks great and I am quite jealous as my wife an I started building ours but have not made much progress thus far due to me being very busy and also (mostly) that I took on a refit of my parents Core Sound 20 that we built in 2007 and she is stripped down awaiting re-painting. 

 

I would echo what the others have said with regards to sailing hard on the wind. to sneak up on being close hauled in light air and not to over sheet. I typically have the main sheeted to where the end of the sprit is in line with the gunwale or just inside it and the mizzen just a touch further inside the gunwale (sheeted slightly more than the main). Also make sure the the board is all the way down of course. 

 

We will be in close proximity to two finished 20 mark 3's weekend after next at our mess-about and Graham and I plan to get some good sailing time on them. 

 

-Alan 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Alan, that is helpful. I have been considering whether we could start a thread (unless it exists somewhere) on sailing tips for the Coresound ketches. I wonder if others would find this helpful?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A sailing tips thread would be great.  I'm looking forward to some good practice time with tips at the messabout.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, a thread on sailing tips would be great. I have gotten some good feedback on "Sailing the CS17". Thanks Alan for your tip on close hauling in light air on this thread. I often find that searching the forum is not as productive as i wished so having all these sailing tips in one place would be really nice.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well guys, I took Dragonfly2 out to race today, but they wouldn't let me. It seems that they can't find a rating for the Coresound 20. I will have to apply to the Australian Yachting peak body for a rating if I want to race. Ho hum! So I tagged along instead which meant starting behind the pack and no competing for line position. It was blowing 10-15 knots with gusts to 23. Our lake is renown for wind from every direction and strong gusts on a windy day. Other days are drifting races! I sailed single handed, full ballast tank and reefed, and on the down wind I was overhauling Careels and the like and interestingly both of the NIS Sharpies. One big one and one little one (no idea, maybe 18 to 20 foot). The small one had to deal with a death roll a couple of times when running, but I had no such problems. The Coresound could point as high, but the NIS made better speed at a high angle of tack and that enabled him to do one less tack than me and slip around a small headland in the lake and get away from me. Now that I have a bit of weight up forard, (anchor tackle and the battery), the boat seems to point better. An enjoyable day that confirmed that I still like cruising over short course racing. We have a race in Oz called the Marlay Point overnight race, I think the Coresound could do well in that.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


×