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Drew

Aussie CS 20-3#5 "Dragonfly 2"

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I love these guides and always have them on my trailers. It makes it SO easy to pull on your painter line from shore and the boat will be guided right where it's supposed to go on the trailer.

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Steve, I will let you know how it all goes in a couple of weeks after I launch her. The old trailer that I reconditioned is a tip trailer, ie., it breaks just aft of the winch mount allowing the stern to drop for easier launching and recovery, so that makes height less of a problem. Regarding the lights, I prefer loose mounted light because I don't like putting lights into the water, even the supposedly sealed LED lights. Lights at eye level are definitely safer than tucked away under the stern of a boat.

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LED's are completely waterproof, literally embalmed in plastic over their internal elements. They don't short out and assuming you used good shrink wrap in the connections, I've never seen one fail yet, once immersed.

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Food for thought PAR, especially since I am using LEDs nav lights. Actually, I am using LEDs throughout the boat, they are an amazing little device with lots of light and low current drain. My plan is battery and 80 watt solar panel.

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IMG_2074.JPG.3f73e3ebc2a4cb84550b73f4d498ee77.JPGThe Dragonly is finally in the water and we couldn't be happier with her. Well, maybe I will be a bit happier once I install the correct masts. You will see from the pics that I have installled a pair of temporary masts with stays until the correct tubing arrives from the States via a company in Sydney. Even with the stayed masts she handles very well and we have sailed her for two days on Lake Macquarie near Newcastle in New South Wales (Google it) in calm airs and in some quite strong blows. Full marks to Graham for such a lovely design that handles the lake conditions so well. We are thrilled with the boat.

IMG_2075.JPG.475708606a88539944805641aa59e65b.JPG

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Your wife's smile says it all. Congratulations.

  • I like what you did with the long hatch. That must make standing pretty easy.
  • It's hard to tell much about the forward hatch. Is the top removed?
  • In the hard blow is that 4:1 mainsheet required? That's a lot of line on the cabin floor!
  • How did your trailer work out?

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Wow !!!  She's a beauty and something to be proud of.  I'd sure like to come aboard for a sail.  Maybe in the right season I could actually come to Australia (never been west of Kwajalien or east of Cape Town, South Africa (or Venice, Italy).

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Thanks guys. Steve, I think the 4:1 is needed. The spare line in the cockpit was so I could work out the main sheet length before cutting it. I am thinking of upping the MA on the mizzen sheet to 3:1.  Yes, the hatch cover was off at the time, I will post more specific pics when we get home. Finger pickin on an iPhone is fraught with danger. The trailer has worked out surprisingly well. Pete, you'all is welcome to visit any time. More later. 

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Drew, Dragonfly is beautiful!  Congratulations!  We built a mizzen tabernacle too, love it!  Now for the good part!  Sailing Dragonfly!,

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As various people have said in the past, the Coresound flies when reaching and running, but I would love to hear any advice from experienced people (are you there Alan?) about getting the best performance upwind, especially close hauled. On my first attempts I have not been able to get her to point particularly high and still keep way on. If I close haul the sails too tight she just wallows without going anywhere fast. Suggestions guys?

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The best advice is to not get greedy and sail too close. Divided rigs by their nature prefer to sail lower. If you sail too high, about 40% of the boat's drive is working in the backwind of the main, so free her up, enjoy the speed and make an extra tack or two.

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   Get the mizzen very close to the centreline and let the main out a bit more.  Try to keep the boat fairly upright and as PAR mentioned, stay far enough off the wind to keep moving at a good clip.  You'll get there sooner by adding tacks and keeping the boat speed up than by trying to get as close to the wind as you can.

   And most importantly - Ignore anything I've said that contradicts Alan's advice :)

   Congratulations on your beautiful new boat!

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Recognizing what your particular design can do, it one of the keys to operational successes against other boats. All boats have a "groove", learn to sail her in it and you'll do fine. Theoretical hull speed and polar plots, about how high you can actually sail are irrelevant. Technically you might be able to do this or that, but reality is you just can't concentrate long enough to maintain this, so take what you can get. Let's say your boat is able to max out at a specific speed, in a certain wind strength. Well this is great and assumes you're sailing the boat within 100% of its potential. Well, reality kicks in and the best sailors would be very proud, to maintain an average of 95% of its potential across a specific distance/time frame. Race winners are those, that can keep their boat in the groove a longer percentage of time, across the length of the race and make the least amount of mistakes. Learning what your boat likes and doesn't like in terms of speed, pointing ability, maneuverability, sail trim, etc. are all contributing factors in how long you can hold her in the groove. I used to race a buddy that was a good sailor, but tended to be sloppy in tacks. I used to beat him regularly and he couldn't understand why, until I told him "why do you think I get into a tacking duel with you on every upwind leg?". I'd get a 1/2 a second on him every time and after a dozen tacks, I'd have a 6 second lead. I knew my boat better and employed tactics to beat him, as we both had similar sail set skills.

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To what everyone said I'll add:

 

Figure out how to use the VMG feature of your GPS. basically you set an upwind waypoint and beat towards it. It will show you the right speed (pointing high vs. not) to get towards the mark. Play around. I own a Sea Pearl which is also a Cat Ketch. I'm not sure how a Core Sound likes to sail, but the SP is best healed a bit to keep sails full in light wind but beyond likes to sail almost flat. I always had that "feeling" but I like measurements and this confirmed it.  Fooling around with VMG has made me a much better sailor on many different boats. I also find that sailing to the wind is very effective. Again, this is not from experience on a CS, but as puffs hit I head up (never ease the sheet!) and watch my sails and keep her in the groove. But Alan will probably chime in and give advice particular to the CS. I'll be listening.

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Thanks guys, a picture is emerging and I will try the suggestions. More suggestions are welcome as I would like to work out how to get the best out of the boat and still enjoy her good qualities. Having built the first of this marque in Oz there isn't anyone close by to talk it over with.

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