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lenm

Ocracoke 20 in OZ

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I can and have tossed possums pretty darn far (they tend to squeal when they land), so how much distance do you really need?

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When it comes to possum removal i have one of these. I do not have possums as she hates them :) 

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I have 4 dogs, the smallest is 70 pounds and they enjoy Possum or any other critter that might happen into the yard.

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Not allowed to throw possums in Oz, they are protected - darn! If you want to throw possums in the southern hemisphere you have to go to New Zealand - they hate them! Throwing possums in NZ is second only to winning sailing races ^_^.

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10 hours ago, Drew said:

Not allowed to throw possums in Oz, they are protected - darn! If you want to throw possums in the southern hemisphere you have to go to New Zealand - they hate them! Throwing possums in NZ is second only to winning sailing races ^_^.

 

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6a010535647bf3970b01761537dc9c970c-500wi

Why are the babies so cute?

e3569fb42fbbe561e74a1e2dbc85cc0b--opossu

While parents can be so ugly?

vicious+opossum.jpg

'cause they'd eat their young otherwise, that's why . . .

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22 hours ago, meester said:

The picture with the big pot makes me wonder - did you name him "Stu?"

LOL That is really were i found him. He was in it under the sink at my father in laws fishing camp. he used to come out in the evening and just sit there and watch my wife and I . I let him go in the north forty and we never saw it again. 

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The possums have been a good intermission for my lack of updates :-)

 

How is she looking?

20171002_174159.thumb.jpg.c112b9a1f1f940c429a52d633dd8125f.jpg

 

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Gents, im having some issues glueing down my 2nd layer of planking.

I've dry fitted everything and it feels really nice and fair.

However, when i apply glue and screw it down, the result is a bit lumpy upon removing the screws.

Not sure whether they are high points between the screws or low points at the screws.

Im talking 0.5-1mm and speculating enough to cause a fairing headache.

Not sure whether im torqueing the screws down too much? 

Too much glue or trapped glue?

Im getting a good epoxy squeeze-out and using a notched trough to try and apply evenly.

And feedback appreciated.

Thankyou 

20171108_172806.jpg

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Gents, im having some issues glueing down my 2nd layer of planking.

I've dry fitted everything and it feels really nice and fair.

However, when i apply glue and screw it down, the result is a bit lumpy upon removing the screws.

Not sure whether they are high points between the screws or low points at the screws.

Im talking 0.5-1mm and speculating enough to cause a fairing headache.

Not sure whether im torqueing the screws down too much? 

Too much glue or trapped glue?

Im getting a good epoxy squeeze-out and using a notched trough to try and apply evenly.

And feedback appreciated.

Thankyou 

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There are a lot of things that can do this, the most common is to not pre-drill fastener holes and just run the screw/washer assembly through to outer layer, into the inner planking or batten. What happens is the screw balls up some debris between the layers, as it drives in and this pushes the outer layer up, because the debris can't be crushed enough to make it totally flat. The tip of the screw also tends to push up the outer layer, just as it contacts the inner. A trick to avoid this is to drive the screw until you see it push up the outer layer, then back it off a few turns, so the now freshly made hole on the inner layer can take the screw tip and get a good bite, before it resists the drive. This trick works on rough carpentry with fairly big screws, though for tight, close tolerance work a pilot and clearance hole are necessary, plus cleaning the area between contact surfaces, so they get a perfect faying surface.

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Thanks Paul, most of my holes were pre-screwed and surfaces cleaned prior to applying glue.

Possibly some debris could be coming off the perimeter of the holes though.

After meticulously fairing rib bands and inner layer, its so dissapointing to have the final layer coming out so terrible.

 

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It's clearly much easier to apply a sheathing to a fair surface. It also helps prevent digging into the sheathing, if it's applied over an unfair surface and you have to do some serious high spot removal.

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On 11/8/2017 at 3:06 PM, lenm said:

 

After meticulously fairing rib bands and inner layer, its so dissapointing to have the final layer coming out so terrible.

 

 

Lenm,

 

I actually don't think your picture showing the low spots looks that bad all things considered. Those lows are all very "local" meaning that a medium sized sanding board is going to be able to take care of them. I think one thing that would be interesting is to glue up a test panel say 12" square of two pieces of planking plywood with some 1" square rails underneath. Apply your glue with the notched trowel and screw the two together into the rails with screws and washers just as you've done on the boat. Then once cured you can slice it in half on the table saw and investigate the panel. Are there lows where the screws are (I suspect there will be of course) and highs between (no doubt)? Without pressure between the screws there is no way the resulting surface could be perfectly fair which leads my to my comment that it doesn't look too bad. A test panel would also let you measure the thickness of the two between the screws (essentially measuring the gap that the epoxy had to fill) and also it would confirm that you are getting 100% bonding which I suspect you are or at least perfectly acceptable bonding. 

 

One thing you could do would be to simply use larger pads under the screws. say 3" diameter plywood disks under your fender washer would spread the load out much farther and I suspect cut down on the unfairness quite a bit. 

 

When it comes time to fair the hull (before sheathing) I would apply some kind of guide coat to the surface such as a light dusting with some contrasting color of rattle can primer (it doesn't take much) or spritzing the boat down with a spray bottle solution of denatured alcohol with some red food coloring in it. The alcohol evaps away leaving the light pigment on the surface. Then once you begin sanding all the small low spots will jump out at you and you can go in with a wide putty knife and apply microspheres to each area, then fair again and it should be ready for glass. You can repeat the coloring again if you wish depending on how far you want to take the surface. 

 

That's what i'd do anyway. 

-Alan

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