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Ocracoke 20 in OZ

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3 hours ago, PAR said:

.......Always show the fingerprints and brush strokes in the finishes to the other half, or they'll expect the same level of expertise when you're banging through the honey-do list.

 

Thanks, some funny stuff right there.

 

I got bagged baking paint on some parts in the oven and drying a large bag of seeds in the clothes dryer, among other things.  Still have to hear about it from time to time.  If she only knew what has happened to her measuring cups, plastic bowls, knives, cutting boards, etc when she's not around.

 

 

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Thanks to the suggestions my shear clamp turned out great - Can really see the shape in the hull now too!

Very satisfying looking at this after 5 months of part time building.

A little more fairing required then ready for planking.

20170513_202748.jpg

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You do realize with this level of craftsmanship, the kitchen remodel that's on her mind, will need to be more and more elaborate and expectations much higher. Show her a few hammer bruises and broken setup screws, in a likely vain attempt to save the day.

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Thanks for the comments

 

10 hours ago, PAR said:

You do realize with this level of craftsmanship, the kitchen remodel that's on her mind, will need to be more and more elaborate and expectations much higher. Show her a few hammer bruises and broken setup screws, in a likely vain attempt to save the day.

 

Haha - You are wise man PAR - I'm liking your stratagem :-)

Beforehand, I have been requested to reinstate the growing inventory of kitchen items now relegated to boat building duties - added the kettle and vacuum cleaner to the list as of last week.

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There is another side to the kitchen debate, though - It's not always the husband who behaves... Shall we say differently?  On occasion I have walked into the kitchen and discovered that there was an autopsy in progress.

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Guys, please can i request some help/advise!

 

I'm well into the planking (1st layers) and i have done such a good job with scribing my plywood planks, they are butting together so tight that i am getting quite a glue starved bond between plank edges. 

Is this a problem? Is there an ideal gap to aim for?

Or not considering the 2nd layer will overlap the joints.

Thankyou 

 

 

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Slightly snug fits is the goal, with gaps being okay except on brightly finished pieces. If it's too tight, yep, you can starve the joint, so take a rasp and knock it back with a few strokes. With epoxy, you just need contact between the two mating surfaces and the goo. If it's a molded area, subsequent layers will hide your sins, but a really tight joint may also pucker up a touch, which can be knocked down, prior to the next layer going down.

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Thanks for your advise PAR - it allowed  me to continue progress today.

A few of the planks were already glued down with really tight joints and some glue starvation as you mention.

I opened them up with a thin hacksaw blade and refilled with epoxy. I feel better they are properly edge bonded now.  

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Progress! albeit slow.

Went with a meranti bottom, stringers and transom.

Test fit of the chine flats today.

Onto topsides soon and switching to Joubert Okoume for this, and the remainder of the project.

 

Have started thinking about the glassing.  

Pondering  how many layers to put on the keel for protection/abrasion resistance, yet not cause a fairing nightmare.

My regular crew never fail in scraping the bottom of boat at the ramp when I am off getting the vehicle :-)

 

bottom.jpg

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Speaking of boatbuilding and kitchens.  Did you realize that granite countertops are perfectly flat surfaces?  They are ideal for gluing up centerboard trunks, for example.

030.JPG

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21 hours ago, Thrillsbe said:

Speaking of boatbuilding and kitchens.  Did you realize that granite countertops are perfectly flat surfaces?  They are ideal for gluing up centerboard trunks, for example.

 

 

hehe -  I can imagine the fire works when the wife gets home!!  :-)

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On 8/26/2017 at 8:43 AM, Thrillsbe said:

Speaking of boatbuilding and kitchens.  Did you realize that granite countertops are perfectly flat surfaces?  They are ideal for gluing up centerboard trunks, for example.

And to think I wasted my time building a bench in the basement for glue ups and varnishing.

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That depends upon the domestic climate at your establishment.  It could get very ugly very fast!  Better still, look for someone who is remodelling their kitchen, and throwing out old granite.  A friend of mine was doing this (it was an ugly color), and I snatched up a piece.  That might save a marriage.  I'm planning a redo of my workshop, and will incorporate it into the plan.

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Sweat god, granite workbench countertops. Yeah man, that's living, but I'd feel pretty pissed the first time I plunged through a hunk of wood I was drilling and dulled the bit on the countertop or worse, was beating the crap out of a stubborn bearing or something and cracked it. I do have a Formica countertop I use in my epoxy mixing station. In fact. I selected the smoothest piece of white I could find, so cleanup is easier and I can use it as a base for laminates or casting stuff. For dead flat stuff, where I don't trust the Formica, I'll use a piece of glass (real tempered stuff) or plexi, which can be bent into developed shapes if desired. I have a few pieces of plexi (acrylic) of different thicknesses for this, a big piece of 1/4" and a few pieces of 1/8" and 1/16". The 1/16" stuff bends real well and is often used over a butt joint to insure it's nearly fair, when pulled free.

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9 hours ago, Chick Ludwig said:

Gosh. The shop floor is good enough for me...

Chick, 

I believe that Larry, Darryl, and Darryl poured this concrete.  I wouldn't throw it any further than I could throw a 'possum.

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10 hours ago, Thrillsbe said:

Chick, 

I believe that Larry, Darryl, and Darryl poured this concrete.  I wouldn't throw it any further than I could throw a 'possum.

Or was it Larry, your other brother Larry, and Darryl? No, you're right, I looked it up. Oh, wait, you mean Larry, Darryl, and Darryl ARE the possums?

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