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lenm

Ocracoke 20 in OZ

48 posts in this topic

There never seems to be a shortage of 'show stoppers' to slow progress of my 20!

I lost my boat work area (garage) earlier this year (to a classic car) and had to construct an outdoor shelter and move the boat build.

Thought I might share this incase anyone is thinking about building an inexpensive shelter for a project.

Asymmetrical bow frame structure made out of decking planks, galvanised roof battens and polycarbonate roof sheeting.

just need to close off the ends now.

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Thanks and thanks Re epoxy - will keep under cloak during the day.

I started marking out some more parts today.

Discovered a small glass cutting wheel works great for making super accurate tracing over the mylar template. I.e. The ones used for stained glass/lead lighting.

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I am stealing your bowed shed idea for a boat/lumber storage shed in back of my garop. Mine will be covered with painted cloth, but I LOVE the curved beam look you came up with.

Thanks for the great idea...

Peace,

Robert

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I am stealing your bowed shed idea for a boat/lumber storage shed in back of my garop. Mine will be covered with painted cloth, but I LOVE the curved beam look you came up with.

Thanks for the great idea...

Peace,

Robert

Sound good Robert - be sure to put up a pic when completed.

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I am stealing your bowed shed idea for a boat/lumber storage shed in back of my garop. Mine will be covered with painted cloth, but I LOVE the curved beam look you came up with.

Thanks for the great idea...

Peace,

Robert

Sound good Robert - be sure to put up a pic when completed.

Fair trade. Thanks again...

Peace,

Robert

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Finishing off Ocracoke Jnr whilst waiting for epoxy to dry on Snr:-)

Planked her with 3mm h80 foam and sheathed with 4oz aerialite surfboard glass. Just need to finish the inside and ready for fairing.

I actually have a scale outboard for it as well which runs!

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What a riot!  I made a model of my Lapwing for my grandson.  Maybe we need a new forum section for "Mini B & B"

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Haha great idea Dave!

So happy to have made some progress!

Jig done

Hoop pine keel done

Stringers and bulkheads cut out

Start assembling soon.

The keel was an interesting introduction to woodworking. Despite obtaining the best timber available, it still had some minor irregularites (bow), however i was able to strategically place the parts (opposing) so that the bow cancelled each other out.

It is perfectly straight.

Being a surveyor i have an OCD when it comes to measurements :-)

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Lowered the keel down into the bulkheads today and it all aligns perfectly!

The lasts few bulkheads going up at the moment and stringers.

The fish have been on which is slowing progress..

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Some more progress!

 

Most ribs are going down easily, however a couple needed some steaming.

 

I used an old pressure cooker heated on a portable gas bbq.  

There is a car radiator hose outlet which feeds steam to a plastic bag tube (vacuum sealer bag roll)

I based it on this method. link below. brilliant !

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=50uXPPt8-VI

 

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Plenty of exercise wrestling the ribs on today. Thankfully i havent broken any pieces as yet.

Planning for twin outboards so went a bit unorthodox with the transom construction. Need to carry the reinforcing further across the transom than a single outboard.

Everything slots through then will be cut flush.

The thickness of the transom will then be layered until design thickness is met.

I think this method will be work out easier than notching.

The twins weigh the same as a single large outboard which is good.

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I spoke to soon - cant get the nominated  3/4 inch pieces around the shear clamp (even tried steaming). Interesting how the pine creases rather than breaks when steamed.

Its broken nevertheless.

Not sure what thickness to try now?

Dont want to steam.

Any suggestions appreciated.

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It's so frustrating when that happens ! 

The best way I found was to twist them in stages and leave them on tension overnight  , then continue twisting the next day  . This was done on the 3 of them on my built . I know, this will take alto of days . I left them dry fit for an other week before gluing them together .

 

An other option is to laminate 4 of 5/8 " instead of 3 

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Yeah, that's classic compressive failure, when the cell walls literally collapse under the bending load. Two obvious choices, one you don't want, but one I've had very good luck with. I stole a grout cleaning steam machine from the other half. This produces steam quickly and with an intense blast. It's mostly the heat that get the wood to comply, assuming the moisture content isn't too dry, which is common with kiln dried stock. The other is laminating with thinner stock. I'm not sure of the size you're trying to bend, but consider using stock milled square and stacking it up to equal the finished dimensions, once glued up. Square stock will bend more uniformly, without edge set and twisting.

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I can't get .75" material around that area either.  Best way I've found is to kerf the material in that area and fill the kerf with glue and set it in place.  So in other words, I take my clamp stock, and set it along the shear area to get the location where the curve becomes too much.  Mark about a foot or so aft of that point.  Then run it through the table saw cutting down the middle perpendicular to the bend from the stem to the mark.  Fill the kerf with glue and get in in place.  I find splitting the piece and leaving it together is much easier and faster that laminating up separate pieces.  

 

Stagger your kerf starts on each piece so the thinning is tapered.  You will need to add one more piece to make up for the lost thickness that is created by the kerf X 3. 

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Many thanks for the suggestions. Will have to give these a go.

PAR, I'm well in trouble with the other half.

Pressure cooker, clothing (rags), fan, measuring cups all gone missing and now the steam cleaner...

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Sweet God, if I had to count all the kitchen appliances I've had to buy for her, just because I used them in the shop. She has a new stove, because I got caught drying some oak in it. A blender, because I was caught grinding up some polyurethane pellets, which in spite of my insistence was completely inert and it could be eaten, still required a new one, the cooking flour sieve, for straining silica, several disposable Tupperware bowls, a couple of HDPE cutting boards, one she didn't like any more because it was scared up with knife strokes, a microwave, because I was warming some epoxy on a cold day, etc., etc., etc. She's lucky I like her . . . then again, it is a kitchen I built to her specifications, which was an obvious screw up on my part. Look guys, never do a good job on your boat, particularly the bright work. Always show the fingerprints and brush strokes in the finishes to the other half, or they'll expect the same level of expertise when you're banging through the honey-do list.

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