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Pete McCrary

Core Sound 20 Mk 3 -- #4 "Chessie" . .

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Pete McCrary    36

You're right about the ballast tank! I thought I was finished with that, but one more job there: another coat of neat epoxy seems prudent. At least I don't have to reach into the tank with two hands while standing on my head.

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Pete McCrary    36

Fellow Core Sound builders:

Reviewing Graham's build log for his Cs17.3 he mentioned installing the rudder hardware on the transom for easy access before putting down the cockpit deck. So, taking his lead, I've done the same.

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The pintle hold-down tab just barely engages the top of the pintle unless it is held out from the transom by about 1/4". That's the reason for the bell-shaped base.

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Next, I think I'll assemble the rudder -- attaching the lower pintle first (on the rudder) and then placing the top pintle for an exact fit to the gudgeons. Of course, all hardware will be removed before glassing.

As a solo sailor I'm especially safety conscious and have concern about the possibility of being overboard, accidentally or on purpose. Without some aid, getting back on board could be impossible. So, I've always provided some means for reboarding that is ALWAYS available -- whether on board or from the water. On Chick's Cs17.3 build log he posted a photo of his reboarding ladder. This is another job to do before decking.

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I'm still researching what may be available [for reboarding] and have found one (an Amar #304) shown below.

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In its stowed position the vertical dimension is 16.5" -- which should keep any part of it extending above or below the transom. Hopefully, that will keep it [mostly] out of the way of the mizzen sheet. If any of you know of other reboarding aids that may be more appropriate, please let us know.

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After installing the boarding ladder's hardware -- I should be finished with those tasks that should be done before decking. Here's a list of those items that I've identified:

1. Drawers in cabin space aft of the bunks between Blks 4 & 5, P & S ...

2. Adjustable shelving support between Blks 4 & 5 up under the bridge deck, P & S ...

3. Battery box support on the keel just ahead of Blk 2 in forward locker ...

4. Removable shelving and its support in the space above forward locker ...

5. Chocks and hold-downs for Suziki 2.5 outboard in starboard cockpit locker ...

6. Retaining rack for spare gas containers in port cockpit locker ...

7. Transom cut-out for Suziki 2.5 ...

8. Removable motor bracket for Suziki 2.5 ...

9. Stern "eyes" for lifting or tie downs ...

10. Rudder / Transom hardware ...

11. Reboarding Ladder / Transom hardware ...

There could be other items that could be more easily installed (or provided for) at this point BEFORE decking. If any member can think of other possible useful items, please post your suggestions.

Next the really fun part will start ...

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Alex    24

Here is a simple homemade ladder that I will be making and installing on my boat after getting caught out again last week when I capsized in strong winds. After righting the boat a few times I was too tired to pull myself in, and no I didn't leave the main sheet on. There was a good size swell and the wind was 25 to 30 odd knots.

I have seen the righting videos of the Spindrift 10 on youtube in almost zero wind and yes that is easy to right and board. Why don't these people go out in real conditions and do these videos. That goes the same for the Coresound MK3 series. Don't show us the righting capabilities in zero wind at a jetty, how about someone that owns one go out in 30 knots of breeze or so and demonstrate the righting abilities under full sail.

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Chick Ludwig    111

The video of the Mk-3 demonstrates the self righting ability of the boat with the ballast tank filled. They will self right regardless of conditions. You may have a point about the Spindrift and other non-ballasted boats.

 

I do like your clever boarding steps.

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meester    21

HI Alex,

 

I also like the steps.  It looks like all rope "hinges" and a pair of eye bolts low on the transom.  Am I seeing that right?

 

Bob

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Alex    24

This is not my boarding ladder, but I will make one and fit it to my Spindrift.

I found these photos on the internet and like the simplicity of it.

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Thrillsbe    62

I like the neatness of my Garelick EEZ-In.  I still haven't completed my build, so I'm not sure how it's going to function.  But it is neat and clean, when not deployed.  You need to be very careful about the placement of the hole in your transom, though.  If I was another 1" closer to the centerline, it would have touched the vertical wall of the seat tank. 

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Action Tiger    139

There is something to be said for simple and robust ladders. Fiddly or spindly ladders can easily fail when a big, cold person is struggling into a boat, especially with a load of clothes on. I think they should be attached as thoroughly as a mooring bitt, or bowsprit, too.

One thing that makes all of life better and easier for us all, though, is flexibility. There is a lot of strength in being flexible, and being flexible gives you a lot of strength.

Climbing trees, crawling, and rolling around on the floor (or ground) all happen to be great exercises. So is swimming.

Thrillsbe, I just LOVE that color! Ever time I see it, it gets purtier.

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Pete McCrary    36

In anticipation of [eventually] building a reboarding ladder (like shown by Alex), I've installed blocking on the port side of "Chessie's" transom. Three inch glassing strips will be added to the bottom and side corners.

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That should finish the before-decking items. Unless one of you can suggest something else easier to do now than later.

As mentioned earlier I have "dry fitted" all the transom rudder hardware. That led to the rudder assembly and its hardware. Then the tiller! Soon I'll have it all done EXCEPT the boat itself. That's a really nice rudder and tiller assembly. Compliments to Graham!

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Showing the tiller assembled with all edges rounded over. Taking the helm is Brenda, a neighbor friend and occasional helper.

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Steve W    38

I like that you put the lip on top of the transom. That will make a nice handhold when you get started up the ladder. I wonder if the front of the aft deck is close enough to reach to assist in pulling your weight forward. 

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Pete McCrary    36

Steve,...

I've thought about a reboarding handgrip. On my PocketShip the gallows support is very useful for that purpose. And my son's Ford 350 pickup has a bar that swings up [vertically] at the tailgate as an aid for someone climbing into the cargo bed. It would need to be deployable by someone [alone] in the water. Maybe stowed in the cockpit coaming? I'll try out some design sketches. One note on Alex's photo: Any wooden ladder should'nt be painted -- potentially hiding structural flaws. Just use epoxy and a uv-blocking varnish.

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Steve W    38

Pete, on my Sea Pearl I made a ladder that follows the contour of the boat that prevents the ladder from swinging under the boat. But it stops at the gunnel. I have a line that goes from the top two sides of the ladder around the mizzen mast. The reason I mention this is that it turns out there is no need for a handhold above the ladder. In practice as you come up the ladder and get your torso above the gunnel, having your weight shift over the boat is all you need. Without a railing I just swing a foot in and sort of turn as I board. I just grab the line that is taught to the mizzen mast and it turns out to be very easy. My guess is that if you can reach from your transom lip to the forward edge of the deck you are all set.

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Pete McCrary    36

Steve,...

Isn't your reboarding aid a "line that goes from the top two sides of the ladder around the mizzen mast."? If that's the case, then it probably isn't deployed while sailing. And you primarily set it up for swimming. Have I got that right? I need something that can be deployed by a solo sailor when he becomes a "man-over-board." Later, I'll show you a sketch of what I have in mind.

I just read Graham's description of setting up "the mast-to-tabernacle-to-bulkhead" interfaces using just the lowest 3" OD tube for the mainmast BEFORE gluing on the cabin roof. A great idea. Fortunately, even with only an 8' overhead, I can do the same by rolling "Chessie's" nose out of the garage. Here are photos of the setup.

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You can see that Blk#2 is far enough out so that the 8' aluminum tube (first section of mainmast) will be clear of the garage and its tip well below the peak of the garage roof. I'll fit and bolt everything in place so that [later when ready] I can refit it all exactly for gluing.

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Notice the casters. I originally thought that I would be able to move the boat around just by having "bunk carpet" under the legs with a little graphite. That worked fine until the module was inserted. Then it was too heavy. The casters make moving it easy -- and four of them can easily be locked/unlocked. Also notice the Yellow Pine floor which made level an uneven and sloping concrete floor. I had to do a "topo" of each corner of every square foot, and then trim "sleepers" to the required profile. Over the sleepers went .75" ply subflooring, then the hard pine.

By-the-way:

In the process of applying fiberglass to the top of the tabernacle side cheeks (to prevent splitting), I learned not to apply fiberglass to the underside of anything. I did both sides (of each cheek) at once and left them (overnight) one side up and the other down. The small (appx. 3" x 4") FG pieces were well wetted to the wood (which had be roughed up with 80 grit). In the morning the two topside FG pieces were strongly in place, but of the two underside pieces, one was on the floor, the other could be pulled off by hand. The "tuition" paid (i.e.,doing it over) for this lesson (180 degrees from upright is a no-no) was small. But the lesson is incomplete. QUESTION: At what angle from upright does the force of gravity become too little for good adhesion? I noticed that Graham successfully glassed "Carlita's" transom with it about 95 degrees from upright.

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Steve W    38

Pete, you are correct about the "swimming ladder" on my Sea Pearl. Not useful in an emergency. The reason I posted it was because I was trying to demonstrate that after you get yourself started up the ladder pulling "in" rather than "up" works. I agree a ladder that can easily be deployed in an emergency is important. If I loved everything about my Sea Pearl I wouldn't be building a replacement. That said it is the best boat I've ever owned. I hope my CS20.3 exceeds it.

 

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You mentioned in a note that you like the concept (general idea above) of the trench hatch I drew in an old post. I still plan on this concept until I find something I don't like, but so far I can't think of a good reason to not like it.In a brief experiment I used the cabin knees to imagine the arch of the cabin top and played around with the idea mentally. My plan is to use plastic hinge along the sides. These are waterproof by design. In the center "lap" I plan to use a joint similar to what a basement entrance doors use where there is a lap. This would mean that one side would need to close first, but I don't see this as much of a problem. Forward of the hatch I plan to put a vertical sort of bulkhead to prevent water from blowing in the front edge. Because the doors will naturally be sloped and the forward edge will drop in a sloped groove, this may even be tight at highway speeds, but if it isn't, a snap cover isn't the worst thing. The cabin doors or hatch boards (haven't decided) would just mimic the slant forward and have a small overhang to prevent water egress. The whole design will require the width to taper smaller as you go forward, but not by much.

 

I like Doug Cameron's hand rails on the forward deck. I'm hoping to have those and when the hatches are folded open have them lay on the handrails and make a horizontal surface that is strong enough to stand on if necessary. I want to be able to walk forward and handle the anchor. I also cab see myself standing below watching the goings on while my kids sail. In looking at the pictures of the boats sailing it seems there is plenty of clearance for this concept.

 

Finally, I will add if it was a great idea everybody would be doing it. I loved Doug's open trench but I like the security of a hard hatch. This was the concept that kept coming to me. Only time will tell if it actually works.

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Pete McCrary    36

Steve,...

On an earlier posting you mentioned a source for the plastic hinge. Out of curiosity, I ordered 5' of it. Reasonable price, but the shipping made it x3. I have my doubts about its use. Unless you already have a sample, I'll send you half of it (2 pcs of length 1.25'). Let me know what you think. My main concern would be its "recycling" life (i.e., opening & closing cycles). With my half of the hinge I'll mock up a small "roof and hatch door" and see how it looks. I'll get the hinge pieces in the mail [to you] tomorrow. BUT let me know if you already have a sample.

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Pete McCrary    36

Steve,...

I'm trying hard to stay with the trench idea. How 'bout just a one piece hatch that opens to starboard and rests on the robust hand rail at the roof-starboard sheer intersection? I haven't scaled the dimensions, maybe it [the hatch] would overhang the roof too far.

Jay's and Chicks (and now Graham's) two-hatch arrangement is also appealing. I had trouble getting up thru Jay's fwd hatch. But just a couple of inches off the aft side would make that much easier. Also, at my present height of 6' I can reach almost any point on the anchor deck while standing on the forward bunk just aft of Blk#2.

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Above showing position and reach.

post-4915-0-33886500-1452217790_thumb.jpeg But I can't quite reach the stem.

However I can reach the anchor and about 90% of the deck ...

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Another point in favor of the two-hatch design is that a dodger would only have to cover one hatch -- and you'd still have standing headroom in two places. Of course with the trench, you'd have standing headroom along the entire length -- but then you'd need a sprit-boom tent that couldn't be deployed until the sailing day is over. But I had a boom tent on my PocketShip and really liked it!

This is not an easy decision to make.

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Steve W    38

Pete, those pictures are just what is needed. I'm 6' also and having you demonstrate the reach is very good information. I think all of your arguments for two hatches are valid.I did have the good fortune of being on a Skiff America 20 and came to like the open trench. All they did was run a piece of canvas across the top and had it draped. If my Saloon door didn't work out I may just do a snap canvas cover with a couple battens to keep it draining. I also thought about a traditional cover that allowed the hatch to shove forward under the front hatch, but that the front part could be removed when needed. Of course it would not allow the "anchor reach". I will look closely tonight when all my frozen snotting is done. I'm in the thick of it now.

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Pete McCrary    36

Moving right along -- putting in about 3 hrs a day. Most recent progress includes careful matching of the 3" mast section to the tabernacle. Getting the exact locations of the bolt holes in the aluminum tube was tedious and troublesome. I actually started one hole appx 1/8" off. Discovered that the tube had moves just a little before I got about a third into the 1/8" wall. The start of the wrong hole had to be spot welded closed. All worked out ok.

I noticed that the inside width of the tabernacle is 3.25" providing 1/8" clearance on each side. I fabricated cheek spacers as kind'a fixed washers on each side. Used 1/8" birch ply with a 1/8" x 1.5" Teflon washer. That was too tight -- so I sanded the washers down to a little over 1/16". That was a nice snug fit. The plywood washer will have to do without any Teflon inserts because I couldn't find any at 1/16".

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Also notice the "wedge" at the top of the above photo. The support for the mast heel (#20b) required a 2 degree bevel so that the mast (with its rake) fits just nicely. The bevel is such that it creates a little pool of water behind the mast which will evaporate slowly and collect debrie. The wedge was cut with a 5 degree bevel which gives a 3 degree slope for drainage. The slot in the bottom in the heel support does not extend into the back of the tabernacle or the bulkhead. By extending the slot out the bottom of the heel support it is hoped to diminish the rain water (or spray) that may flow down the mast and enter the cabin thru the bolt hole.

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post-4915-0-25528400-1452818979_thumb.jpeg Closeup of the wedge in place.

Next are the cheek washers glued in place. They will have several coats of neat epoxy. And if I can find 1/16" Teflon washers, they'll be insterted.

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The assembled tabernacle . . .

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This afternoon the tabernacle has been located on the face of Blk#1 and attached with #10 1" Pan Head wood screws thru the back side of the bulkhead and into the side cheeks [of the tabernacle]. Of course, later it will be permanently glued in place. It is "plumb perfect" and perpendicular to the decking cleats -- as proved with my 48" level. Next I will wheel the stem outside of the garage and actually mount the mast (1st section) to its hinge in the tabernacle to prove all works freely. Photo to follow.

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