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Pete McCrary

Core Sound 20 Mk 3 -- #4 "Chessie" . .

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Steve W    38

Pete, she looks awesome. Take lots of pictures. It will be a bit before "no name" aND Chessie are on the water together. 

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AmosSwogger    9

Pete, I'm working on the inner coaming and coaming caps.  I noticed you installed blocking under your coaming cap (see picture below) about 2/3rds of the way forward of your transom to aid in hardware attachment.  I'm thinking of copying your idea.  Were you happy with how that worked out?  What thickness of blocking would you recommend? 

 

image.jpeg

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Pete McCrary    36

Amos,...

I used 3/4" yellow pine.  Yes, I'm happy with it -- although I'll try not to have any hardware on the caps.  I have purchased but not yet installed a pair of flush (lift-up) mooring cleats for the stern.  I plan to install them just forward of the transom.

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Pete McCrary    36

Tomorrow I'm picking up a newTohatsu 3.5 LONG SHAFT (i.e., 20") to replace the Suzuki 2.5 short (15") shaft.  Recall that there was excessive cavitation when motoring solo with empty ballast tank.  I've also fabricated the toe rails and applied 4 coats of varnish.  They are mainly for cosmetic purpose because I hope not ever to have to walk on the cabin roof.

 

The temp & humidity in the Washington and Chesapeake area has been brutal as usual.  I'm hoping to get in a lot of sailing in August and into the fall.  I'll make complete reports after a few sailing sessions.

 

BTY, the Suzuki 2.5 is FOR SALE at $500.  It's almost new with only about 3 hours running time.  Here's a photo showing its entry into the water.  Notice that the actual waterline is a couple of inches below the DWL (bottom edge of the red boot).  "Chessie" was at a slip, empty ballast tank, sailing & safety gear aboard, but no people.

 

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In in the photo you can't actually see where the water meets the transom.  The gray edge is actually the bottom edge of the transom.  The water surface (greenish) goes under that part of the transom.  The water surface actually meets the transom a little above the boat's centerline.  When rotated for reverse, the cavitation plate is just under the edge of the transom by about an inch.

 

BTY (again) -- What do you mean by [you] found [me] on Page 3 ??

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Steve W    38

Pete, if you haven't posted in awhile, the way posts show as I have things configured, your thread drops. I always get excited when a Mark I I I post shows, especially ones like yours that are always detailed. And you have been pretty proloific.....so to find you all the way on page 3 was a concern. I'm glad you are well. Did you get Chessie back from B&B?

 

As for the motor......I put my Honda 2 in which is long shaft, and that is my fall back. Do you think the light weight of the boat and your anchor on its mount so forward was a factor?

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Chick Ludwig    111

I have a zuki 2.5 short shaft on Summer Breeze and don't have a problem with cavitation unless I go forward. I notched my transom a couple of inches to where the motor can swivel, and the "foot" clears as Pete says. maybe the difference is that i sit behind the mizzen when I'm motoring, and maybe Pete sits ahead of the mizzen. Sailing, the balance and trim is better if you are forward. 

 

I think that graham's personal 17, carlita, has a short shaft also. 

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Pete McCrary    36

Chick,...

I, too, sit aft of the mizzen, and the transom "cutout" is just deep enough for the "foot" to clear the bottom.  Since the cavitation plate & prop are the same distance below the transom bottom [in the respective distances from the boat's centerline] it could be that our CL distances are different and/or the DWLines are significantly different for the 17 vs the 20.  Also note that in calm water I didn't notice any cavitation -- but just a little chop or passing wake, it was unacceptable [to me].

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Pete McCrary    36

The Tohatsu 3.5 was mounted yesterday.  Should be long enough.  The bracket (made for the Suzuki 2.5) needed a slight modification for immediate use.  However, in order to reverse (180 degree), the tilt had to be moved out of its 1st notch.  So the shaft isn't quite verticle.  If this shows to be a problem, then a replacement bracket will be a winter project.

image.thumb.jpeg.6a0a3d68b57bc7aaab46c8308755a6d1.jpeg Forward.

 

image.thumb.jpeg.167eb2cb65161c6102ed9df7f770f1c7.jpeg Reverse.

 

There is a "tilting lock-pin" rather than a spring-loaded latch.  I like it much better.  Easily seen and much more secure.  I'll feel safe trailering with the OBM tilted in the UP position.  The longer shaft would drag pulling into a gas station or driveway if there is even a slight dip at the entry.  Here's a pix of the pin:

image.thumb.jpeg.efb1cfd00cdaa5d6df5de393f8110c47.jpeg

 

Below is a pix of the modification to accommodate its position and motion.

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We're getting close to our 1st "shake-down" cruise -- so I've designed the "badges" for "Chessie's" name at the bow on the sheer strakes.  Shown below is the pattern for the port-side badge:

image.thumb.jpeg.9714de41d9fcaba6cecebe6b9964ed52.jpeg

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The starboard-side is on the reverse of the pattern.  It will show the anchor, but a dolphin will replace the seahorse.  The images and lettering will be computer routed on 9/32" mahogany planks that I've ordered from our local hardwood dealer.

 

Oops!  Didn't know these would be published.  So, anyway, on July 11 Annie and I celebrated our 58th anniversary!

image.thumb.jpeg.e31a96cee1c970902b5dfe0049c3c7e7.jpeg

 

 I suppose after each of us buying a greeting card for each other 58 times we would eventually buy IDENTICAL cards to trade.

image.jpeg

 

The toe rails were dry-fitted today.  Tomorrow they go on.  We do the shake down cruise the next day that it's not too hot.

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Steve W    38

Thank you for the update Pete. I can't wait to here about your sailing trials. I sure hope my Suzuki works. Mine is mounted a bit forward and maybe a bit lower, but we'll see. I was concerned enough to make sure my Honda 2 long shaft would work if needed. Please take many pictures and videos. If all goes well maybe we'll be down at the MASCF and get a sail. I just returned from a week in Germany, and Jazz hands already has some spider webs on her. I may get after her this weekend, but I'm not rushing.

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AmosSwogger    9

It looks like you have rudder travel limiting block (for lack of a better term); is it that to prevent the rudder blade from hitting the prop?

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Ken_Potts    58

Happy Anniversary!  I hope my wife and I will celebrate our 58th also, but I better not hold my breath as we're only approaching our 7th now. :)

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Pete McCrary    36

Amos,...

Yes, they are "rudder traveling blocks."  The starboard one was designed to avoid conflict with the Suziki 2.5 prop and the port one to prevent the pintles hardware from gouging the transom when the helm is hard to starboard.  It also prevents conflict with the replacement Tohatsu 3.5, but may need modification after the OBM bracket is redesigned so that its shaft is vertical.

 

Ken,...

Thanks for the congratulations.  We feel very fortunate.  Best wishes for your upcoming Seventh and many more.

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Pete McCrary    36

"Shakedown" report,...

"Chessie" was taken out yesterday and launched on the ramps at the Leesylvania Start Park on the Potomac River in Woodbridge, Virginia.  The new Tohatsu 3.5 long-shaft OBM (replacement for the Suzuki 2.5 short-shaft) was mounted on the bracket (designed for the Suzuki) with a shaft thrust angle 5 degrees up from horizontal.  The longer shaft requires that the motor be tilted up for transport.  Fortunately, the motor is locked in the up position with a 1/2" locking pin that can't be accidentally released.  The Suzuki locking arrangement is by a hard-to-reach (and in my view, flimsy) spring-loaded latch.  The following photos show how close the rig comes to "hitting bottom" when exiting / entering our diriveway.  The trailer's aft cross-bar has a steel roller welded just next to where the aft boat-roller is attached -- it engages the driveway for a distance of ~ 4 to 5 feet.

 

image.thumb.jpeg.f32ea431f795be1f55c6427a2d4f04e5.jpeg

 

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At the ramp, the time required to have her "launch-ready" was 1.5 hrs.  All work was done by me solo with Henry observing.  The mizzen mast was stepped first and used to raise the mainmast high enough so that the forward hatch could be opened.  From that hatch I raised the main to upright and would have secured it with its topping lift while ducking below to secure the foot-pin with its locking nut.  However, with Henry present, he saved me the trouble by holding the topping lift taught.

 

image.thumb.jpeg.1a45752a039101b82f09e1174cbdbce4.jpeg

 

Note at this point:. Stepping the mizzen has not been a problem (except in windy conditions).  However, raising the mast (single handed) is very difficult for this 83-yr old geezer.  My torque calculations (for a 22 lb mast + ~ 1 lb of lines) indicate a lifting force (at 44" from mast-pivot point) of approximately 53 pounds.  That has to be exerted with my left arm (I'm right-handed) with little help from my right arm.  That's because the tabernacle is tilted about 2 degrees to port so that [when lowered] it falls to the port side of the mizzen.  That means I have to stand in the open forward hatch on the starboard side of the mast facing to port.  Note to builders (who haven't installed the tabernacle) -- better to wedge it to starboard for right-handers.  It also makes it easier to enter the cabin (both masts lowered) when mounting the cockpit over the trailer's port fender.

 

The lifting force required would be much less if I would be willing to clime onto the top of the cabin.  I'm trying to avoid that.  A fall from that position to the hard Tarmac could be permanently crippling (even fatal).  Maybe a "gin-pole"  with tackle to the trailer wench, or use a "push-pole" while standing in the companionway's hatch.  OTHER IDEAS OR SUGGESTIONS ARE INVITED AND WELCOME.

 

Here's the trailer sans boat:

image.thumb.jpeg.2d761f2000c154b5997c0a95375797b4.jpeg

 

image.thumb.jpeg.3a835e566a42285f6133cb264840c03f.jpeg

 

Finally, in the water.  Notice the "flat calm."

 

image.thumb.jpeg.ba9f66bbba35d96574b81380ba930600.jpeg

 

image.thumb.jpeg.a5d036049d0a3147af3f9a036eb0751a.jpeg

 

image.thumb.jpeg.ae561abbcc6fdd27f7c064ef49013ffa.jpeg

 

You can see we had very little wind.  Once in a while, there would be a bit of light wind, and she performed well and easily balanced with the mizzen.  The ballast tank filled and emptied as expected.  I must remember to raise the CB before reaching the ramp dock.  In this case the tide was out and the CB dragged in the mud and took a bit of boat "wiggling" to get it up.  This boat sits so low on its trailer that all three: CB, rudder, and motor must be raised before starting recovery.

 

The Tohatsu 3.5 started up on the 2nd pull as expected.  The extra 5" made a big difference.  The surface of the wake was much smoother and it nevert "cavitated."

 

HOWEVER, I did have a major problem when restarting on the water after sailing.  For me it's always a dilemma: use the choke or not.  How long a cool-down before the choke is needed?.  In this case it was a fairly short time, so I set the throttle to its "restart" position (i.e., slightly higher than the ""start" position), set choke in no-choke position, and pulled.  Nothing!  Pull, pull, etc.. Tried a little bit of choke: got a cough, then nothing after several pulls.  I thought a vapor lock or flooded carb. Temp on the water was ~ 91 degrees.  I tried to remember the cure for vapor lock (wet cloth over the carb ??) or flooding (open throttle, no choke, for a while ...??). I opened the throttle full open, tilted the motor up, started to paddle towards the ramp (~ half mile away).  Then sailed a little in several puffs -- and tried a restart.  It sputtered and got going [eventually] nicely.  BTW I had a Tohatsu 6 Pro (25" shaft) and it never gave me this kind of problem.  Do any forum members know the best way to restart a warm-but-not-cold engine?  Or how to avail a vapor lock or flooded carb?

 

I can't tell you the speeds we got (wide open) because we forgot the GPS -- but it seemed like ~ 5 knots.

 

After recovery, the time to get the rig "road-ready" was again ~ 1.5 hrs.  We were both very hot, dehydrated, and exhausted.  We left my driveway ~ 10am returned home by ~ 7pm (ramp is 23 miles away OW, light traffic).  Maybe I can get some good pixs when I cruise with fellow catboaters (Chesapeake CatBoat Asso).

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alexscott    11

Why don't you try a counterweight on the bottom end of the mainmast. You could try strapping weights onto the forward side of the mast with hose clamps to make the experiment reversible. If it works, you could go with lead inside the mast.

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PAR    188

I'm getting old now and have been using an old trailer winch to physically hoist the mast up in a tabernacle, instead of walking it up. On smaller boats it's just a temporary rig I strap to the centerboard case, but on my larger boats, a permanent fixture to hold the winch. It's so easy, just crank until it's within a 1/2" of being up (locking pin holes nearly aligned) move forward and tweak it a bit as I jam in the pin and it's over. I used to use weights on an older boat and had a couple of folding hooks on the forward side of the mast to hold them, until the hoist was finished. These weights would then get toss into a holder the bilge, alongside the centerboard case.

 

Once an engine has been started, you generally don't need the choke again for the day. If you do, it's probable the carb needs to be leaned out a bit or cleaned. If you've flooded the engine, twist the throttle wide open (no choke) and crank. You need as much air as possible in this situation. Once she burps or starts to start, back the throttle down to near idle again.

 

I used to have a driveway like that and one of my trailers used to do the same thing, so I installed a cylindrical roller just under the aft cross brace, so the trailer would roll on it, instead of drag on the driveway. It was a little awkward at first, but once you got the hang of it, you just "pushed through" when the roller hit and no more concrete divots.

 

It's likely your speed was higher than 5 knots. You should be able to hit 6 knots pretty easily on that boat with 7 and 8 also pretty easy (bow up, feeling like she wants to plane off). In fact, I'd bet you can get her over 10 knots with enough umph from an outboard and trimmed out nicely (crew sitting forward). Some quick in head math, 10% prop slip and 700 - 800 pounds load, 11 knots isn't unreasonable.

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Ken_Potts    58

The 91 degrees would have made it extra tough to work on rigging while looking at all that cool water over your shoulder.  I think you should first look at any tasks that were uncomfortable (heavy lifting) and sort those out.  If you extend the post that holds your winch so it ends a few feet above the deck you could put a block on it so you can haul the main mast up while standing on the ground - The line for hauling up the mast could be tied around the mast at a height that is easy to reach when the mast is up and you are standing in the forward hatch.  If there's not enough mechanical advantage you can add blocks until it's easy.  Let me know if I'm not explaining this well - I can post a sketch. You can leave this mast raising line rigged (but slack) while trailering the boat so you don't have to set it up to use it.

Once you've got the strenuous tasks fixed you can turn your attention to making other things faster and easier. The first thing that comes to mind is sail bags.  If you're using the bags that the sails came in you are spending time unfolding the sail and figuring out which end is up, etc. I made long skinny bags for my current boat's sails.  The bags zip along their length and the ends of the bags are sealed with velcro. When I finish sailing I drop the sails and zip the bags on before I take them off the sail track or the outhaul.  That way they are ready to deploy again next time - It's just a matter of putting the slides on the track, connecting the clew to the outhaul and unzipping the bag.

Each time you go out you can find something that will make the process a little quicker and easier.  Sometimes it's just a matter of leaving a knot tied or replacing a knot with a soft shackle.

Experience will also allow you to order your tasks so you don't climb onto the boat or crawl through the cabin more times than absolutely necessary.  One thing that I think is really nice is that the more times I sail a boat, the easier and faster it is to rig.  It's just one more excuse to go sailing :)

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Chick Ludwig    111

Gosh Ken, you just said all of the things i would have said! I ordered the long sail bags you mention from B&B. They call them "sausage bags". GREAT time saver as you can also leave the battens in place.

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Steve W    38

Pete, that is a huge post to digest, but first of all.....congratulations! I remember my first sail in "Suzy J" and how excited I was and this is a much much larger accomplishment.

 

Thoughts:

 

1. I like PARS idea of a roller, but there are a few things you can also start out doing that can make a big difference. Since the back wheels of your truck are close to the hitch, a drop hitch of 1 or 2 " or so wouldn't effect the clearance much of the tongue, but would probably raise the back of your trailer a similar amount. The downside would be a little deeper launch, but I bet you have no trouble as low as Chessie sits. You could also maybe move the hitch post forward or move the axle back a bit depending on weight distribution. I have the same problem with my Sea Pearl and I have the winch post forward enough I can't slip through between car and trailer, which is a pain, but it gives me the clearance to get her out of the barn without hitting. I just load more gear back a little to keep tongue weight correct.

 

2. Kens idea is a good one. You can also easily add a chrome D-ring to the extension to act like a turning block and actually use the winch strap itself tied to the halyard to pull it up. I'll also add I used to have a Capri 18 with a very heavy mast. I had an extension attached to the rudder that allowed me to get the mast tipped pretty far up and it held it there while I went to my winch and pulled it up. This "pre-raising" got the angle right for that 2nd step with the winch. 

 

3. How much time do you attribute to the actual rigging? I wonder what an experience Core Sound Sprit rig sailor could expect with a bit of practice getting into the water.

 

Keep the reports coming!

 

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