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Pete McCrary

Core Sound 20 Mk 3 -- #4 "Chessie" . .

609 posts in this topic

The Mess-About was good fun and I had a chance to see Jay's Southern Express.  What a fine job!

 

"Chessie" is a tight fit in my shop and her bow often must be moved outside the garage door so that I can get to the area that I'm working on.  At first I was moving her around the shop floor by muscle power alone.  The bottom of the cradle legs were covered with "bunk carpet" impregnated with graphite.  That made moving on the yellow pine floor fairly easy.  But by the time I returned from the Mess-About, the project had gotten so heavy that I couldn't move it by myself.  So, I ordered 6 casters (4 with brakes & swivel locks) and installed them on the cradle legs (cut 4.25" shorter).  Now I can literally move her with two fingers.

 

I'm nearly finished the "below deck" work that would be difficult or impossible to do after decking and roofing.  Namely, stowage drawers in the spaces under the bridge deck, shelving just aft of bulkhead #2, outboard motor chocks in the starboard-side cockpit hatch, and the motor mount.  Here are a few pictures of the motor mount project:

 

Just as I was finishing up the motor mount final touches, much colder weather set in.  To combat that I fabricated an insulated enclosure housing my epoxy center.  It is heated with a small lamp.  I discovered that 15 amp wasn't enough.  So, now I have light bulbs of 25, 40 and 60 watts available.  So far, the 40 watt bulb keeps the interior of the box at about 20 degrees F higher than my unheated shop.  Photos show the set up.

 

Now, I'm ready to finish the filleting and glassing the inside of the Water Ballast Tank and under the Cockpit Sole.  Labor intense for a week or so -- then the fun part starts.

 

Questions re "posting" techniques.  Note that when previewed, all the photos were bunched at the end of this posting and I was not able to edit their positioning (which I could previously do).  Also, each appeared just as soon as I clicked on "Attach this file".  Previously, I had to also click on "Add to Post".  Then the file name (in <brackets>) would appear in the test where I had left the curser.  That didn't happen on this occasion.  Any suggestions from veteran forum members?

 

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Pete, you are making me look bad with all this progress. My posts are always from my workplace, but when I'm in the shop I'm focused. I am ready to go 3-D but I've been stalling just because it will make my shop that much smaller. I want to try and finish the cockpit module/centerboard first just because my assembly spot will be occupied with the boat, unless I assemble on my table saw, which means it's not available.  I like the caster idea and I think I will pick some up immediately. It seams it will be easier to mount them now anyway.  

 

A couple of questions:

 

1. It looks as if the transom extends above the deck. I don't remember that being in the plans. Is there a reason?

2. What kind of wood is that motor mount?

3. Is that Suzuki long shaft or regular?

4. Will you put a drain hole in the motor well?

5. In picture 10 there is what appears to be a hole below the backer for the motor mount. What am I seeing?

6. Question for others......will the mizzen sheets snag this motor, because this mount looks exactly like what I want to do.

 

BTW.......I am planning to make my oars break in half so they can be long enough and I won't have to have them intrude into the cabin like Doug's. Do you plan on rowing "Chessie" AKA (to me anyway) "Fiver".

 

Take Care,

Steve

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Steve,

Yes, the transom extends a few inches above the deck. Keeps things from rolling off the stern and probably looks better.

The motor mount element is 2.125" thick, made up of one piece of 3/4" yellow pine laminated to a white oak slab made up with eight 3/4" x 1.375" pieces (from the same board) with every other piece flipped like Alan made his centerboard. The oak (grain) runs verticle to the horizontal grain of the yellow pine. The motor clamps screw against the yellow pine.

The mounting brackets are pairs of 3/4" plywood laminated to 3/4" yellow pine. Tuhe y-pine elements are outboard and the plywood inboard.

The three doublers are 3/4" yellow pine -- one under the transom transverse stiffener from the starboard side to the center stiffener, one each vertical doubler on each side of the (extended) footwell side.

With the hardware, it weighs just under 6 pounds. The hardware is 5/16" SS machine bolts and locknuts. The bracket will be well "bedded" to the transom and removable if necessary.

When I purchased the Suzuki they didn't offer a long shaft. I'm kinda glad they didn't. This forces the motor to be lower and probably less of a problem for the mizzen sheet.

There are drain holes in each aft corner of the motor well.

That hole is for the starboard-side cockpit drain pipe.

The mizzen sheet may be a problem, but there's really no way to avoid it except with an "inboard engine." But it should be minimal with this setup because the motor housing and tiller hug the deck (when sailing). And there are some rigging solutions as well.

In order to be Coast Guard compliment my alternate propulsion will be a paddle that can double as a boat hook and/or mop handle. Much later I'd like to make a pair of oars. I like making oars. The next will be my 5th pair.

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I bought carbon fiber ferrules from Duckworks and I plan to make my oars so they break in two. I was assured they would be robust enough for oars this long. I travel in some circles where motors are frowned upon, and there are a few reservoirs where they are banned altogether that I plan on visiting, so rowing is desirable. I have a Honda Long Shaft 2hp, and while it's a great reliable motor, it's loud. depending on how your sea trials go, I may get the same motor you have. I'll be curious to see if the motor pops out of water when seas are rough. Maybe some of the other Core Sound people know.

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I bought carbon fiber ferrules from Duckworks and I plan to make my oars so they break in two.

Ooooh, gonna have to check into this!

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Dave, I talked to Chuck and he assured me they were robust enough for 10-11 foot oars. I plan to make my Oars long enough to stash behind the seat backs, but have a couple of feet removable so I don't have to have them stick out or intrude into the cabin. I figure the longer you can make the main body, the less stress on the joint, but I was told not to worry. I may try and incorporate a tether so the two pieces can't be separated. I'm a ways from that.

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Based on the pictures from Duckworks the locking button comes installed in one of the 2 pieces.  Why would you need a tether?  It looks like a well thought out piece of hardware from what I can see.

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Fellow builders,

Just before Thanksgiving I finished glassing the module (under the ballast tank and foot well) onto the hull bottom. Hard to get to with body contortions, poor lighting, etc. Planned to do it over three days -- filleting in the am and glassing in the pm. But I was so wroung out after the first day that I rested a day after the first and second applications. I'm so glad that's over! Now the fun part begins.

I'd appreciate suggestions from other builders as to procedure for rollover:

a -- by removing legs off one side of the cradle and rolling her (that way) over onto old tires and then propping her up for sides and bottom prep for glassing, painting, etc. Then rolled back onto cradle for final fitting out and painting; or

b -- passing a loop under her (at about her center-of-gravity) and thru pulleys (a pair hung from the ceiling rafters), removing the cradle, and after rolling her (with the line thru the pulleys), lower her to temporary supports. Reverse after the bottom work.

I think I've seen photos of both methods. Maybe method "b" would be easier to get her right-side-up after the bottom work. Comments and procedural suggestions, please. Photographs, sketches, ...?

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Hi Pete, we have been sailing our boat quite a bit, who love the rig, still learning the cat-ketch, but the boat is really handy! When we rolled our boat inverted we used all muscle power. When we had painted the hull we used the scaffold of either side with 2 2X8 spreaders holding the scaffold apart. We used hardware store pulleys about 4 inches in diameter with a 4 inch strap and a cable come-a-long. Pictures being worth 1000 words, hope you can see what we did. It was actually very easy to turn the boat upright.

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Hi, Jay ..

Thanks for the pixs. Yes, they're worth a 1,000 words. I think that I can do the same as your rig, but I won't need the scaffolding. The ceiling rafters in my garage are exposed (and about 8' high) and my pulleys can be hung from them. They are 2 x 12s spaced 16" with every third rafter "doubled" -- and designed to support a heavily loaded attic. QUESTIONs: Did you have a way to shorten / lengthen the loop? Would that be a requirement? Each loop has a natural purchase of x2 -- did you rig it for more?

Also, I noticed that there is a shallow (guess 3" or 4") keel on your hull. I haven't noticed that on the B & B plans. Is it something you added? Would you recommend it for others?

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Pete, what ya can't see is the snatch block mid cable and the cable come-along on it. That is how I lifted the boat, super easy, but super nerve wracking! Just had to go up enough to pull the saw horses out then I balanced the boat fore/aft and it wasn't multiple choice! Over she when!

I have a 5/4 skeg on the keel line. I think most guys put a bronze or stainless wear strip on it. My 2 Paws has/had some rot around where the screws went into the skeg, so on this boat I made a slurry of epoxy with carborundum powder in it. After it cured I had a few minor areas that I wanted to touch up with my belt sander, it totally stripped the abrasive off of a new belt. I took 2 1X4s with packing tape on them and clamped then either side of the skeg and poured/ trowled the expoxy mixture on. I feel like I can slide the boat across the south coast with no damage!

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Jay, I think what Pete is asking about is the depth of the keel. Is it as designed, or did you make yours deeper? 

 

Really cool idea for the "rubbing strip".

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Hi Guys,

I'll probably skip the skeg. The bottom of the Chesapeake Bay is mostly soft mud or sand near beaches.

Regarding the snatch block mid cable -- what mechanical advantage did you use? You said lifting the boat up off the cradle was "super easy," so it must have been enough.

It appears that you used two loops -- spaced so that the center of gravity was between them. If I had 4 strong men to help balance the boat while finding the CG lifting point (by trial and error), do you think that I could get away with using only one loop through a pair of pulleys? And if I did that, maybe I'd need more purchase (with the snatch block) than you used with two loops?

ANOTHER QUESTION re the turnover: I'm planning on having the boat completed to the point of all bunk tops and decks glued in place, shear strakes and seat backs installed, and cabin roof installed.-- but companionway (braced) but hatche(s) and tabernacle not installed. However, I'm considering NOT GLUING IN PLACE the Footwell Sole until AFTER the rollover. I think it would make installing the Anderson Bailers a bit easier. What's your view on that?

PS to Jay -- I really liked your electric powered ballast control, but I've decided that I'm past the point of easily building it into my boat. Alan praised your setup and would recommend it -- but it's too late for my "Chessie."

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Jay, I have always liked your pics that show the skeg. I had planned to put one on my boat because I like the way a skeg adds to most boats' course keeping ability. What did you build the skeg from before putting the carborundum rubbing strip on it and is it simply glued and screwed through the hull, or glue only? BTW, the down under CS20 is getting closer. Cradle built and soon ready to join hull components and create a boat-shaped shell in my garage.

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Hi all, the skeg is a 5/4 X 5 that I transferred the shape of the hull too.  I tried to keep the "bottom" level so the keel rollers on the trailer would have something to support.  Mid length it is probably 2 1/2 inches tall and aft maybe 4 inches aft.  I planned a flat on the hull, maybe two swipes with the plane, ran a 4 inch tape full length of the hull then set the skeg in a generous bead of thickened epoxy, a 1/2 inch filet and tape completing the skeg.  I too feel like a little lateral plane helps when running with the board up.  Also helps when I pinstripe the bottom of the bay!

 

For those that heard my ballast pump howl, I have added some rubber  (Lord mounts) from a motorcycle project and it is MUCH quieter.  Doesn't sound like a vacuum cleaner anymore!   It will fill the tank in 4-5 minutes and empty it about the same time.

 

Pete we finally just used one strap and 3/4 double braid (old halyard)  around the hull for the roll over.  Found the balance point to be just aft of the main companionway.  The snatch block was put on the rope along the spreader bar (2X8 along top of scaffolding) and a cable come-along was attached and pulled the line to raise the boat (2-3 inches) then the saw horse on the bridge deck and forward of bulkhead #1 were removed then the boat was rolled and  lowered back into the building jig after I cut out the area to allow for the skeg.   The hull was padded with foam floor runners for protection.  When we rolled the boat, Carol was on the bow, I, the stern and after we started the roll we had to hold back to control the roll rate.

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Jay,

I think I'll go the pulley method to roll the boat both ways. It looks better than rolling it on the floor with old tires as cushions -- especially back upright onto its building cradle. When it gets close to that time I'll probably ask you to sketch a rigging diagram showing the pulley and "come-along" geometry. Thanks for your comments.

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Fellow builders . .

"Chessie" gets a little closer to her Rollover nearly every day. I haven't yet decided on the foredeck and anchor configuration. But just in case I want a small blunt bowsprit -- I've cut and fitted a breast hook that will be available as a support base. I'm thinking of something like Jay's bow roller, or maybe a hawsehole at the stem with the (recovered) anchor in chocks on the side (of the boat) where I could more easily reach it (by standing) at the foreward end of the companionway. The deployed rode could be gotten (for weighing anchor) from the exit of the hawsehole with a boat hook and the rode then recovered hand-over-hand to get the anchor into its chocks. The anchor deck would only be used for the rode & chain and kept (or moved) out of the way for raising / lowering the mast. The hawsehole could be wide enough for a second emergency anchor. Later today I'll see if I could reeve (from outside to inside) the bitter end of a spare anchor rode while standing in the foreward end of the companionway. I'll let you know.

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This morning the top of the foreward locker was glued on and a fillet applied all around. Of course, the top will be covered with two coats of neat epoxy, but I'm not planning on any fiberglass. In the photo you can see the supporting cleats for a shelf over the locker. The transverse cleats are not glued to the bulkheads, but are held in place by pan head wood screws. So also is the shelving. Thus to facilitate discarding the shelving if I don't like it or for modification.

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Next I'll be prepping the bunk tops.

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Getting to the fun part! I like 20 minutes of effort looks like you accomplished a lot. On the other hand hanging into the ballast tank taping it to the hull, 8 hours with no apparent progress!

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