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Pete McCrary

Core Sound 20 Mk 3 -- #4 "Chessie" . .

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Greetings fellow builders,

My next project (my 9th small wooden boat) will be the cs20.3 Level 2 kit. B&B has agreed to assemble the hull to the point where it may be safely transported (in its cradle) on my trailer from NC to my shop in Manassas, Virginia. My target launch date is early spring 2016. I think Steve W saw the hull being assembled at B&B.

As soon as the order was placed I ordered a Load Rite trailer which arrived last week. Its dimensions and weight distributions are now known. The axle must be moved forward 16.5" so that the tongue weight will be about 160 lbs when loaded with a cs20.3 of 1,200 lbs (equipped and ready for sailing). The trailer is rated for 2,200 lbs cargo -- so the springs may have to be adjusted (or replaced) to soften the ride.

Now in retirement, I find my time in the shop as therapeutic. My first boat was a plywood 11 foot sailing dinghy built in 1963 from plans out of "Popular Boating." Then following that -- an Alcort Sail Fish (kit) in 1967, a DN iceboat (1969), a 15' 6" cedar strip canoe (2003), a Penobscot 14 from plans by Arch Davis ( 2005), a Nutshell Pram (kit) by Joel White, a 14' 10" LOD PocketShip (kit) by CLC's John Harris, and lastly a "nesting" Eastport Pram (kit) also from CLC.

The cs20.3 will be named "Chessie" after the C & O RR's sleeping kitty, the Loch Ness monster, or our Chesapeake Bay. While "Chessie" is being built, I'll be sailing "Tattoo," my PocketShip. The attached photo shows her on the Sassafras River on a rainy day in May 2012. Tattoo is the Army's longest and most beautiful bugle call -- which is played in barracks 15 minutes before Taps. Apropos for his old man, says my #3 son.

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Congratulations!! Welcome! I hope you enjoy the build as much as we are enjoying ours! The MK 3 series will be wildly popular, Graham and the B&B crew have a winner! Ours will be named " Southern Express". We are looking forward to a early summer launch of our CS20.3 sn 2. You "trenching or hatching"?

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Pete-

Congrats and good luck and welcome aboard! Enjoy the build. I know we will enjoy your progress

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Pete, I look forward to the parallel journey! CS20.3 #3 is going to be behind yours. I was planning on going 3-D in about 2 weeks, but things have slowed a bit. Life keeps getting in the way, but I am in no hurry. do you coe to the MASCF at the CBMM? If you don't, you should!

 

Take Care,

Steve

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Mid Atlantic Small Craft Festival and Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum.

 

Just to confuse things a bit,  MASCF is at the CBMM and both are in St Michaels, MD.

 

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That is also my goal. I am actually hoping to launch around Memorial Day in 2016, but I'm not going to push too hard. There are usually a few B & B boats at the festival, but if we each bring a MK III, it will be like an invasion. I think these boats are full of oppurtunity to customize, and it will be interesting to see each persons "finish". Jay (#2) is adding a pump for his water ballast which I am anxious to see how it works out. I like to keep things simple, and I might not have any hard wiring, but we'll see. I am currently shaping the centerboards and building the case. I will be creating a thread on the Woodenboat forum soon. 

 

Take Care,

Steve

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Fellow builders -- considering electrical systems for the cs20.3. I'll probably have a deep-cycle 12v battery as a power source for GPS, smart phone, maybe a water ballast pump, etc. But not for lights. I'll try to find a good source for LED navigation lights powered with dry cell batteries in each unit. My night-time travel on the water is very infrequent and wouldn't justify wiring and its maintenance and connections/ switching troubles.

As a recharging source I'm thinking of a fold-up portable solar panel (mounted on a lightweight 1/4" plywood panel) that could be secured ahead of the foremast over the anchor well. It could be designed so that it would stay in place when sailing and be easily removed (and stowed) while mast raising (or lowering) or deploying (or recovering) the anchor and ground tackle. The battery and charging stations could be well forward so as to keep wiring to a minimum. That would also be about 60 to 70 lbs placed low and forward -- helping the boat's weight distribution for a solo sailor (like me). Critical comments and suggestions are welcome.

Pete Mc

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Graham was thinking of putting the battery on the hull (cabin floor) just forward of the ballast tank.  The box containing it could serve as a step down into the cabin (you need something to serve this purpose).

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I would not want anything encumbering access to the anchor in case it was needed in an emergency. In general weight is better near the center of the boat. Weight in the ends can amplify wave induced motion of the boat. Seems like most of your electrical uses are central and probably would be easier to access the solar panel if it was located centrally. The one advantage I see of the bow location is it is relatively free of shadows, but I don't  think that justifies the other disadvantages. You can sit a little further forward when solo to trim the boat or place some gear in the cabin.

 

Best of luck with your therapy. I look forward to following your progress.

 

Joe

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I use devices that use AA batteries (LED running lights, GPS, flashlight). They last a long time on everything I have. I have two USB charged devices (Tablet, phone) that use I need power for. So far, I've been using a portable charging brick that gives me about three charges for each. I had a few big boats and I feel the more systems you have the more you work for the boat, but that is just me. When somebody hands me ice from their big boat with ice maker, I am grateful. If Jay's pump system works out, I may duplicate it, and then I have to think about more power, or just use a Whale type pump and "armstrong" power it. I think all those years of backpacking make me think just having a dry place to sleep is decadent!

 

Bottom line is that this whole process of bringing these boats to life is going to be fun to watch.

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On my Spindrift I used a portable LED navigation light that uses AA batteries. It's not the brightest in the world but it does the job. I'm pretty sure I got it on Amazon. It came with a flimsy plastic bracket but I used a small scrap of mahogany to make a custom block that fit into a hole in the breasthook. On the stern light I use the bracket it came with with but I plan on doing something nicer at some point.

 

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On my J/24 I have a U1 size 12V AGM sealed deep cycle battery. It's much smaller than a car battery or a regular deep cycle boat battery, but has plenty of power to run all of the nav electronics, house lights, and even the auto-tiller when we use it. It weighs around 27 pounds and fits in the smaller size battery box you find at West Marine. U1 dimensions: L: 8.31" W: 5.13" H: 7.25"

 

I have a 5 watt solar panel we set up when we're not sailing, and it keeps the voltage over 13.0 throughout the year. I installed a charge controller to keep it from both overcharging the battery and balancing the top of the charge cycle.

 

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Fantastic!  Beautiful!

Chessie's trailer has been recovered from American Truck & Trailer with its axle moved forward 16.5".  Stripped with only the winch stand in place it weights just at 400 lbs at the axle and 500 lbs with the wheel jack down -- so, tongue weight is at 100 lbs.  The scale at Manassas waste management site is certified to +/- 20 lbs.  Next I'll mount the spare tire and the 2 x 6 cross members to which we will mount the cradle with Chessie's hull (when ready).  This is getting exciting!

Pete Mc

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