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Steve W

Core Sound 20 Mark III #3 "Jazz Hands"

293 posts in this topic

Slow progress as it's sailing season! Luckily I have three boats to sail while I work on "no name" 

 

I'm at the cabin roof. I perused Pete's pictures and others. I glued a strip down the center of the two cabin tops and laid it up on the top of the boat. Unfortunately, my 2nd bulkhead collapsed a bit under the pressure of the hull panels and I assume the humidity of my work area. So the roof doesn't lay real good because of this. It's got gaps as big a 3/16". I made the hatch "frame" on a perfectly flat surface and glued it in, with a wider piece clamped with it to keep it from sagging. To get it to fit at the sprung bulkhead I had to trim about 7/16 of material from both sides of the "knee" part.  I'm fine with not letting perfection be the enemy of good, but the fix has me scratching my head. I am thinking to  glue in shims to the top of the plywood to get it perfect like "Chessie".

 

My questions.

 

1. I wired in the knees and glued in the forward ones, but I am planning on removing the aft ones after the top is on. I have sat below and think these are in the way and since Doug Cameron's boat doesn't need them, I'm not having them. Chick built some kind of laminate beam here, but I'm having trouble figuring out how he kept the right shape. did  you make a big laminate beam somewhat to the shape and then planed it down to match the temporary knee?

 

2. In this picture, stolen from Pete, the support beams look like bent cleat stock, but after trying to bend stock that short, my guess is they were traced off the top edge (pattern bit?.....too late!) and then a parallel band-saw cut gives them this nice looking curve.

 

post-4915-0-35342900-1463672767.thumb.jpeg.2939d42b3a439feaa234c361b2f3b1b0.jpeg

 

3. In the plans, there are extra longitudinal supports not shown in Pete's picture. Knowing I have to add them in (Pete apparently didn't know until later), what does the joint look like? Butt joints? Half lap joints?  It seems to me as long as there is a good bond to the roof panels a butt joint would suffice.

 

Thanks in advance.

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Steve. I knew the width and crown needed for the beams. Alan supplied this info. I made a jig to bend 1/4 inch laminations around. The beams are, I think, 4 laminations. I actually added about 1/2" more to the crown figuring some spring back, and this worked out almost perfect. When I set the beams in place, one of them was slightly low, so I just used a stick down to the hull to force it up, and left it in place until the cabin top was finished. The other beams, plywood top, and longitudinal beam down the center kept everything in perfect alignment.

 

I just don't like the knees in the cabin. to me they are visually in the way, and potential head knockers. Discussion of the beams is on page-6 of my build. "Summer Breeze - Core Sound 17, Mk-3"  The center beam is on page-7.

 

 

DSCN1558.JPG

DSCN1557.JPG

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Hi Steve, looking good!  I used knees and beams......Chick can relate why.  I installed the knees then used a batten to capture the arc of the cabin top, then transferred it to pattern paper.  I cut the beams out of some locally grown white oak and attached them to the knees.  When I installed the cabin top it made a nice fair arc.  I butt joined the pieces on the centerline with another piece of oak.  So far no problems and I am a "larger" guy. 

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I'm thinking a simple Ball valve just inside the rear hatch on both drain tubes is a good idea instead of plugs. Glued in they should be easy to operate and as strong as the pipe. What am I missing? 

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New Step in "No Name" She folds up.

 

5936f8a3de95a_2017-06-0521_48_44.thumb.jpg.5d2452e85f557ba95d483346784d35a1.jpg

 

 

2017-06-05 21.36.26.jpg

2017-06-05 21.37.50.jpg

 

 

My son printed me a centerboard pin. I gave him the 0-ring. He's a freshman in HS. Too cool for school!

2017-05-27 16.24.03.jpg

 

5936f89fcb4e3_2017-05-2716_46_50.thumb.jpg.6aa6b0c59beffca2a99e589f0320c5ee.jpg

 

 

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"No Name" has a name. "Jazz Hands" is her name! More on the reasons, but it feels good to have a name! I'm already thinking of her paint job and graphics.

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Wow! 3D printing has come a long way in 25 years.  I remember when we used a laser, printing in a slurry bath.  The resultant plastic was so brittle it was only good to use as a visual aid.  

 

Can't wait to hear your naming story.  I still get asked if I'm a beekeeper.  My boat's name is Local Honey.

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3 hours ago, Ken_Potts said:

3D printing has come a very long way.  They're even using it to make rocket engines these days: http://www.spaceflightinsider.com/missions/commercial/rocket-lab-electron-rutherford-peter-beck-started-first-place/

 

 

Which proves once again that Kiwis really can fly!! ;) 

Steve, all names have an interesting history, and "Jazz Hands" looks quite unique. Looking forward to the back story.

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jazz hands
noun
  1. a gesture in which the hands are waved rapidly to and fro with the palms facing forward and the fingers splayed, used typically to express or indicate excitement or triumph.

The story:

 

My wife's mom had her and her two sibling in classic and modern dance when they were young and as a result my wife is a great dancer. Her biggest skill though is dance parodies. She can imitate anything from classic ballet to disco to the whole Snoopy gang doing each Christmas dance as well and every other dance craze through the years. It is hysterical. 
 

Of course the kids were cool with it through the early years but became mortified a bit as they got older. Anyway, my kids found musicals in high school. My wife and I would always tease them when they came home from practice with the question "Jazz Hands? Is there a dance with Jazz hands?" to which there response was "No! No jazz hands."

 

Helen and Andrew were finally in a production of "Thoroughly Modern Millie" and we got Jazz hands. It was a great moment for us.

 

But it didn't stop the gesture from being my wife's and occasionally my wave during sporting events, hellos and goodbyes. My wife gets pretty animated during the gesture and it was Helen who suggested we name her "Jazz Hands". As a tribute to family and especially my wife. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Great Story. The scroll-work in the cabin of my boat is a tribute to my wife's family, as I cut it out of a favourite old piece of furniture that had belonged to her grandmother but had become derelict. The name "Dragonfly" is a tribute to our years of flying an aircraft that I built called a Dragonfly Mk2. When I was a boy my father operated a small coastal cargo vessel called the "Briscal" - it operated mostly between BRISbane and CALoundra. So it just proves - every boat name has a story.

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