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Steve W

Core Sound 20 Mark III #3 "Jazz Hands"

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I just looked at my credit card statement and Carla was true to her word. She charged me a cutting fee, and I guess that means it's official. I am giddy with excitement about starting.

 

My previous experience building a boat is my Spindrift 11N, which was a test run to see if building was for me. There are a few links in my signature if you want to see it. I currently own a Sunfish, the S11N, and a Sea Pearl 21 WildCat. I hope the Cow Bell meets my love for my Sea Pearl, and after a discussion with Dale N at this years MASCF, I feel it is going to.

 

I took a trip to Maine two summers ago, and it was on that trip I decided I wanted a cabin bigger than the little tent the SP offers. I looked at all kinds of plans, but I just didn't want to give up the performance of WildCat and that mizzen. When I saw the CS20 MK2 I was really excited watching Chick's build. When I saw that knockdown recovery video I was hooked. Of course the wider cabin on the Mark 3 offers a more comfortable seating spot. I sat in Doug's boat when I visited him to make sure its what I wanted to build, and I could imagine 3 or four folks waiting out a rain with ease down below.

 

I'm blessed to live near the finger lakes in NY which has great sailing. I spend a week each summer in the 1000 Islands and this will be a great boat for those places. I also want to do the EC one day and this boat seems really well suited to that.

 

Anyway, I am currently negotiating to buy a trailer, and then its off to NC once I get the word it's ready. I hope to chronicle my build on a blog once I start.

 

 

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Thanks. I wish I could just build it from scratch, but with three kids and a few hours here and there it might be best to save the time of cutting, not to mention the dust. Plus I think there is quite and opportunity to add some personal touches to it. I know that the sooner I get to it the sooner it will be done and the sooner I can do more sail camping with a second person. My plan is to take my time and build it patiently with a good level of fit and finish.

 

The driving factor is that the boat is exactly what I was looking for. Cat ketch, sleeping for two, light weight, sitting headroom, big cockpit, capsize recovery. I'm a little wary of the sprits and slab furling, but I'm not so old I can't learn a new trick. I'll be active with questions!

 

Take Care,

Steve

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Chick, you know these boats well. I am looking for performance, but I put a big premium on fast rigging. My Sea Pearls best asset is the way I have it rigged I can have the masts stepped, booms on, and be backing it in in 10 minutes tops. I'm hoping for something similar.

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You can get the sleeve luff sails with a "zipper" that will allow you to reef. I'm not sure of how it's rigged, but it surely is better than rolling the sail around the mast, or using a vertical to reef.

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Steve,

Glad you have made the final decision.  I think you will find the CS will meet or exceed all you expectations.

 

By the way, I enjoyed talking with you at St. Michaels.  You were having so much fun with your Spindrift that it made me want to build one for myself so I would have boats for all occasions.

 

Good luck and have fun building.

 

dale

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Dale, was I actually sailing the Suzy J? That little boat spent more time sailing with others than me. I wish I had raced it. I took my Sea Pearl out with a very inexperience crew and no stop watch! Crossed the line early and had to loop around and restart, but still finished third. I didn't see any Core Sounds in the race and few at the event compared to other years. Was it ever gusty. I think the last reach home would have been fun on a planning boat. Anyway, it was talking with you that really set the "Let's do this" wheels in motion. do you go to the MASCF each year?

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No, I have only been there once before.  I have always wanted to go and bring 'Lively' but it never seems to happen.  It is a long way for me from FL.

 

When I first saw you. you were just sailing out and having a ball.  Later others took over which is when we talked at the dock.

 

This year I happen to be in the area visiting my son in Baltimore.

 

Maybe next year with one of my boats.

 

dale

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I made it home from B & B with a sailboat (in pieces) on my trailer. I left last Friday with my three kids, and spent two days in Washington DC at the Smithsonian. Monday we went to the Maritime Museum in Newport News. That museum is really fantastic, especially the Monitor exhibit. Monday, a big ice storm hit and a drive that should have taken three and a half hours took five and a half. I think everyday winter road conditions up here in western NY are scary for those who have never driven on ice covered roads. Tueday morning, here is what the trailer looked like. Check out the hub. I had noticed she wasn't bouncing after awhile and I'd guess there was at least 100 pounds of attached ice.

 

post-853-0-16946700-1424285110_thumb.jpg

 

Anyway, I arrived at B & B around and left hours later. I was lucky to meet Graham, Alan and even Carla (and Deja and Mandy the dogs). I am drawing a blank on the gentleman who assisted loading the trailer. Graham gave me quite a few tips and I got to watch Alan run the Shop-Bot while he made a plug for the mizzen mast. I had left my kids at the Hotel in New Bern and we left there at 2:30. We drove in some pretty challenging conditions for an hour or so, but once we got to 95 it was mostly dry roads. With a forecast of snow, I decided to take advantage of the weather window and arrived home at 2:45 in the morning.

 

So now it's time to build another boat.

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Steve, I am still trying to pull the trigger on a first time build.  I have no doubt that the CS20Mk3 is my best choice.  But as  first timer I have a couple nagging doubts about my potential success. 

 

Seeing your newly launched project I thought you may have had similar pre-decision questions!  

What do you think will be the length of time for your build?  I know this is all subjective and based on other time commitments, but I will be a part timer too.  I do not have young children, but my wife likes to see me occasionally and I work full time! 

The other concern I have is parts of the build. I am most concerned about building the centerboard.  I think that may require the most skill and if lead is involved beyond my ability. 

Thanks for any insights you are willing to share.

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Greg, I'm about two hours away from you. Maybe I can help with your centerboard. See if B&B is willing to make your centerboard. Graham and Alan were working on a plan to do this. Not sure if they are ready to go yet. If not, It's really not that hard. 

 

Are you going to build from a kit? It's by far the best way. I think it's well worth the cost---especially for a "newbe". Feel free to give me a call at 828-595-9432. You may even be interested in our little group of builders up here. Check out our Facebook page. Not much going on right now in the cold, but there will be a few of us building boats as the weather warms up. Here it is: https://www.facebook.com/groups/401422193348393/

 

Looking forward to hearing from you.

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Greg:

 

I built a spindrift 11N to see if boat building was for me. A great way to get started. I hadn't even planned to build a bigger boat, but its kind of addicting.

 

to answer your questions:

- What do you think will be the length of time for your build?

I have no idea. I didn't keep a log when I built the S11N, but because I had no idea what I was doing, half the time was spent thinking. the fact the kit has all the parts cut out eliminates time and potential mistakes. Being that the building plans aren't quite done, that could slow you down, but I believe the plans are in the works and would be a great help. If you haven't done so, look at Alan's CS15 videos to get an idea of the sequence.

 

I have a wife and three kids. Luckily, I have kids that like the shop and a wife who has her own things to keep her busy, so I guess I am blessed. I find if you work a few hours in the evening or early in the morning, the hours add up and it gets done. Just remember to keep the honey-do list whittled down and don't ever do anything boat related in the kitchen.

 

- The other concern I have is parts of the build. I am most concerned about building the centerboard. 

when I built the little boat, I found using a well set up hand plane was one of the most fun aspects of the build. Have someone show you how to use a hand plane and practice a bit and I think you could do it. the fact you are asking questions first bodes well.

 

-if lead is involved beyond my ability. 

I bought a lead tip precast from B & B. I just couldn't justify gathering lead, and learning to cast for what they charged. I wouldn't let that stand between you and a boat.

 

One last thing. It is far less expensive to buy a boat than it is to build one. If I didn't love spending time in the shop, having something I built myself, I wouldn't even consider it. I figure I'll have about 8 or 9000 in parts including the trailer, and a lot of labor. For that kind of money, you could buy a boat. Just not this boat!

 

I hope this helps.

 

Take Care,

Steve

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Today I spent cleaning my shop and carrying the pieces from the garage, through our house to the basement shop. Normally I would bring the plywood through the basement sliding door, but the snow is so deep, it would have been tough to make that happen. The number of pieces is amazing. I also laid out the pieces in the floor and bundled them up in order. It looks huge in the shop.

 

The big problem I have is getting it out of the basement once its finished. Doug gave me a measurement that I confirmed when I visited that the boat was about 47" from the bottom of the keel to the top of the cabin. If this is true, I should be able to get it out the 48" door on its side. I'll keep an eye on things as I start adding the cabin top and if necessary I'll finish it in the garage.

 

I've decided to build the Centerboard and rudder and tabernacle  first. I'm traveling for work for a bit and there is no sense getting into anything big until I can focus.

 

I made a list of wood to buy for the centerboard. The big question is what species of wood to use. I'll research this, but if anyone knows species we have up her in New York that would be good for rudder, centerboard, tabernacle and cleats, let me know.

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Boy howdy there a bunch of parts, when I saw them in a pile, it is a bit intimating, but 99.87% of the parts fit exactly as they should.

I had the centerboard and rudder cut on B&B's CNC machine, I kow it is absolutely as designed that way. I covered it in glass and epoxy, finishing with a full coat of West 422 barrier coat additive. I used the total thickness to establish the width of the centerboard trunk. Also gave a good recurrent training session using epoxy.

I used SLP (very common in south Mississippi) for the cleat stock, I bought some old dry stock 1x8 22 feet long my local board store had, so far, I have used about 3 times the amount of cleat stock I thought I would need! There is a heck of a lot of cleat material needed.

post-3962-0-30263700-1424598698_thumb.jpg

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I am not sure what is available in your area but recommend you explore two woods:

Douglas fir and mahogany. I found them both easy to work with, available and capable of being found in long, clear lengths.

Best of luck!

Fun adventure.

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SteveW,

For planing my centerboard (White Oak), I made this jig for my router. The trick is ensuring that there is no twist in the jig base.

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Progress slow. I spent Saturday morning hunting down some framing lumber for the cradle, and enough Douglas fir for the centerboard and rudder. the local pickings were slim, but I think I found enough to build both. I also picked up some eastern white fir for cleat stock. I could only get ten foot pieces, so I'll have a few scarfs, but I'm finally going to start. Right now I'm trying to decide how to chronicle all of this. Blog, wooden boat forum, or here. Pros and cons to all three.

 

And Don, your router jig is very much like what I plan for my centerboard. thanks. 

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