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meester

CS15 with a lug yawl rig

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Bob,

 

I would like to add my congratulations also. You are going have a lot of fun with that boat. I hope to get to try her out one day.

 

I am with Ken, do not give up on the bailer. When the spray is flying you will appreciate it, there is nothing like the sound of the bailer sucking air as you are hiking out and going fast on a fresh day telling you that the boat is empty. Beside sailing, I always open the bailer on long road trips. I have driven through torrential rain and it is comforting to know that the boat is not getting damaged by  that sudden gain in weight.

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Hi Alex,

 

I'm happy with the lug rig.   It points well and I haven't experienced the death roll downwind that a few posted concerns about.  I was out near Kent Island in 15 kt winds a couple of weekends ago with two reefs tucked in.   Wife and I were kicking up spray and grinning.  

 

I just replaced my yard with something beefier.  The old one was 1.5" diameter max at about 1/3 the length, with tapers.  I realized that by the time I had enough downhaul to smooth out the creases, the upper triangle of the sail was dead flat.  The new one is 2" diameter and it's much stiffer.  I just rigged it today, and it looks much better, but I havent tested it yet.

 

I think the main drawback is that when people ask what kind of boat it is, it's a long answer.   Hey Graham and Alan - can I just say it's a Core Sound?  

 

Here are a couple of pictures from 1st launch day.   I thought I had posted them earlier -- sorry!

IMG_7599.png.bf88e24b6b5cf942c58c0d0eac01c1fe.pngIMG_7644.thumb.png.e9e1175cb646cc4c2f0c344124835428.png20170715_111336.thumb.jpg.087abf5655f9562522731a8c325db958.jpg

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Very good looking, especially the home made sails. GIR, a Goat Island Skiff, has done 2 or 3 Texas 200's which involve a lot of running downwind in heavy air and no one has mentioned death rolls. See:

https://www.storerboatplans.com/design/rig/sails/sailing-unstayed-cat-ketches-and-cat-yawls-safely-and-efficiently-downwind-in-strong-winds/

Great job on the boat!

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I just returned from the Mid-Atlantic Small Craft Festival where I met a lot of great people and saw a lot of interesting boats.  Graham and Alan were there and they gave a nice evening talk.   I"ll be happy to tell you all about it, but right now, it's time to brag.  Please forgive my massively inflated pride.

 

For me, it was an amazingly fun and victorious weekend.

 

I entered the "Mellimac" for judging in the contemporary design division, and picked up a 2nd place ribbon.  (That's brag #1) A lot of people stopped to ask about the boat and the rig, and I often got asked about how the lug does against more conventional rigs.  I hadn't really sailed with other boats yet, so I had to say that I didn't know,

 

Now I know.  My boat is fast!  Ok, certainly not embarassingly slow.  The MASCF has an informal sailing race  with boats of every shape and size.   Handicapping would be a hopeless task, so the race directors typically decide on the classes after the race.  It's a fun, light-hearted format.  This year, the director decided on sail shapes for most of the race classes, and I ended up with a 1st place ribbon in the lug sail class.  But that's not the bragging point.  Here's brag #2:  I came in 6th out of about 45 boats overall.  I'm pretty sure that no boats smaller than 15' came in earlier, and a lug rig coming in early surprised a few people, me included.

 

As if my head wasn't getting big enough. Brag #3.  Graham and I went out for a sail so that he could check out the lug rig.    Overall, he seemed to be pretty happy with the rig's behavior and he gave me some good tips on avoiding the death roll and on smooth jibing.   What an honor to get coached.  There was one thing that he really didn't like, and that was that I don't have telltales on the sail (yet).  After Graham had taken a turn,  Alan came out and gave it a test drive.   Alan paid me a real complement.  Brag #4:  Alan said, and I quote, "very cool."

 

I'll stop grinning in a couple days.

 

Bob

 

 

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Hi All,

 

Here's a little progress on my winter projects.   First, I learned to make netting and I have made nets that go under the decking to hold gear.  There's bungee cord across the top and the bottom row is made with smaller loops so that it can be pulled tight.

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I'm also working on a tent, and I put up a rough draft mock-up to check things out before investing in good materials.  The basic idea is to suspend the boom and yard in a lazyjack system between the main mast and mizzen and then hang the tent below that.  In the mock-up, I just put the quick & dirty "tent" on top of a suspended spar.   There are 4 x 6' fiberglass rods (driveway markers) that hold the roof and then I would add side walls.      It could be a lot of windage, so I am also thinking that in a storm, I'd lower the stern end and tie the roof right down to the deck.  

 

20180122_140042_crop.png.a691e04a21ac55e0fd27238fb849373b.png20180122_143254_crop.thumb.png.65b7789a240a447fa04b77ecffdffe14.png20180122_144020.thumb.jpg.f5ca6e0ed167b8045c5ee8e3fbe57e75.jpg

 

Thanks to Steve W for describing something like this to me when we were at the messabout.

 

Bob

 

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Neat nets.  I need to try those.  I found a couple of youtubes.  Did you have a specific place you learned to tie them?

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