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Sailing video of our CS20

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Hi all,

 

I finally got a new camera that takes decent video so here's my first stab at trying to capture what it's like aboard our CS20. Before I built ours, I wished a thousand times there was something like this for me to watch.... maybe this will provide some "motivation" for other CS builders when they're in a slump feeling like the project will never get finished.  :)

 

 

Cheers,

 

Wes

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Wes,

 

Thanks for the video.  I've read about how balanced these rigs are and couldn't help but notice that you frequently let go of the tiller when adjusting your sheets.  Is the boat really that balanced or do you have some additional tension on the tiller from your tiller taming device that was described in your building blog?  I'm getting closer to making a commitment to start a Core Sound build, just need to decide between the 17 and the 20.  Your video will help get me moving.

 

Mike

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Hi Mike,

 

That's my tiller tamer holding her steady. However, with a little more effort and concentration, it is also possible to adjust the centerboard, main sail, and mizzen sail to a near perfect balance that will hold a straight course for a substantial amount of time, even with an unattended tiller. Of course, the wind needs to be fairly steady as blustery winds will upset that balance. Indeed, you can even steer the boat with the sails. Sheet in the mizzen and ease the main and she'll turn to windward; ease the mizzen and sheet in the main and she'll bear away to leeward (though you have to be mindful when attempting this in substantial winds or you may also capsize). The more I sail this rig, the more I love it. If you want to really learn to manage the rig well, you'll learn faster without a tiller tamer. But once you've got a solid understanding of the rig, and especially if you sail solo often as I do, you'll really appreciate being able to leave the helm briefly to attend to other things.

 

Wes

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Hi David,

 

I use a loop of bungee that attaches to a hook on the underside of each hatch cover. I spent a long time dreaming up other solutions because for some reason I didn't like the idea of using bungee cording, but once I finally tried it, I was impressed how well it holds the hatches shut (once you get the length right for proper tension) and yet how easy it is to stretch to unhook the loop and open the hatch. It's simple, cheap, and works great--especially for how rarely we need to access the fore and aft compartments. (I only stow the anchor in the forward compartment, and lifejackets and a few floatie chairs in the rear one.) I certainly like the "uncluttered" look of having no latch mechanism visible on the outside of the hatch.

 

Wes

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Wes,

 

Nice video.  Looks like a it was a great day for sailing.  Wish there was a lake like that around here.

 

And, I'll say it again.  You did a nice job on your boat.

 

Randy

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Cool video, Wes!

 

But even cooler is your nav-station box in the other video "DIY Multiporpose Deck Panels" which I will steal outright and adapt as my v-berth filler.  :)

 

Thanks!

post-564-0-39391300-1377575539_thumb.jpg

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Thanks for the kind remarks, all.

 

Joe, I'm using a Fuji X20 mounted on an UltraPod II mini tripod. The tripod has a velcro strap, so I was able to mount it to the masts, the tiller, the throttle arm of the outboard motor, etc. I was surprised how many different angles and shots that little tripod made it possible to capture. I need to find a way to waterproof my X20 though... it's not really "water friendly."  :) The video isn't the best, but it's a lot better than my previous cameras or my smartphone can do. The still pictures are outstanding. Nice little camera and much easier and more pleasant to lug around than the big DSLR I used to rely on.

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Wes,

Just want to add my complements on a great video.  I enjoyed it very much.  Except for a different hatch, 3' longer and a rear deck she reminds me very much of my 'Lively'.  Thanks for taking me sailing on your boat.

 

dale

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In the video, you likely noticed that I have my main sheet set up to terminate at clam cleats positioned on the coaming on either side of the cockpit. I liked that setup and it worked well, but it meant the mainsheet ran across the seats, and I have little girls who somehow always seem to end up sitting on the mainsheet at that location, depriving me of sail control. Rather than waiting for the inevitable capsize, I went ahead recently and changed the mainsheet so that it now terminates in a swivel base cam cleat at the edge of the thwart. This means no more main sheet running across the seat tops, and it also makes the main sheet easier to release or re-engage because the cam cleats are noticeably smoother to operate than the clam cleats I had before. It also makes it easier to sit on the rail and hike out, which tended to put my legs in the way of access to the clam cleats. With the new hardware, it's much more convenient. And it frees up a little more seating space, too, since there's no clam cleat to jab you in the back if you try to sit in the wrong spot.

 

Here's a picture. I know others have installed similar hardware (or fabricated their own versions). I just wanted to say that I really like this setup. BTW, these are Ronstan RF58 swivel base cam cleats. There are two (one on each side of the thwart), though only one is shown here, obviously.

post-354-0-50754800-1379255033_thumb.jpg

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This is a spectacular build.  The overall quality, rigging and outfitting are simply outstanding.  There are dozens of details illustrated in the video that are worthy of close study. 

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This is a spectacular build.  The overall quality, rigging and outfitting are simply outstanding.  There are dozens of details illustrated in the video that are worthy of close study. 

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