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Kudzu

Say Bye Bye to oil based paint...

9 posts in this topic

Been hearing this for a long time and looks like it is happening. Just left my paint store and picked what may be my last quart of oil based porch and deck enamel from my supplier. She was telling me one of the companies is pulling the quarts off their shelf. Another no long has the oil based any more. She is running out of suppliers and that in a few months she will not be able to get any.

 

I am sure it will be available from other sources for a while, but it's going to get harder to get. And you know where this will end up. So if you building soon you might want to think about buying you paint ahead of time.

 

Latex works, but I don't like it much.

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I had a chat with the manager of a Sherwin-Williams outlet and she was saying that it should be around for a long time, but harder to find. I appreciate why the government wants to move people to latex.  But they have to realize it just does not work on many surfaces. 

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She was insistent it wouldn't be available at all but I didn't buy into that but didn't argue with her. She might have it but I figure someone will. I was thinking the local Sherwin Williams would probably be the next best place, but they couldn't mix that bright green for me in enamel either and the Ace Hardware could. So I am still concerned.

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Just picked up 2gal of valspar oil based porch and floor at Lowes last week and they had lots more on the shelf

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I disagree. The acrylics have come a long way in recent years and easily surpass basic alkyds, in every regard. In every way you measure their performance, a quality acrylic will kick the butt of a quality traditional alkyd. Mold and mildew don't like to live on acrylic surfaces, like they do on alkyds, so there's not much defense of them any more. I can see some possible uses for some of the high end modified alkyds, but once you get into these, the polyurethanes take charge in performance and cost, so the point is moot. The only place I vary from this opinion is with clear finishes, where the acrylics have a way to go yet and the alkyds still rule.

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Granted I have only painted one of my boats with a latex paint, but it there was no comparison to the enamel I have always used. Softer, marked easier, left paint on ever thing I scrubbed over. Maybe in 2 years they have made some big strides but past experience says otherwise.

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The physical properties of all the usual paint formulations are well documented. I was a staunch alkyd fan, particularly on wood, but recent testing (my own and independent) have clearly shown, the latest acrylic formulations are better in every way they're graded. There are a number of things to look at and that get tested or compared, but again, it's important to compare apples to apples. For example the lowest cost acrylic Ace Hardware brand house paint, just doesn't stand up against a poly modified alkyd, but if you compare the mid-range priced Ace Hardware enamel house paint ($30 per gallon) against the same in acrylic (same price), you'll find that gloss, gloss retention, density, UV resistance, hardness, tolerance to temperature extremes, mold and mildew growth are better with the acrylics. It's the binders and resins system combinations now employed, that have shown the greatest improvements in the last couple of decades.

 

If price is the primary goal, then yes, a base alkyd will be a bit more durable and glossy, compared to a base acrylic (both about $20 per gallon at Ace Hardware). If on the other hand, you step up into the mid grade quality products, the acrylics will tend to be the better choice. The reason for all these "improvements" is in 2005 the US government has passed some requirements, that has forced the formulators in the industry to refine and upgrade the water borne products available. It's in the last 10 years (they knew what was coming) that the biggest gains have been made.

 

Paint is one of the few things in life, where you actually get what you pay for. The paints I'm using cost anywhere from $80 to $600 a gallon. A $20 - $30 a gallon paint just can't compete with these types of paints, but for a home built, on a budget, less than perfect surface, might just be what the doctor ordered. Use the best paint you can afford.

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 The paints I'm using cost anywhere from $80 to $600 a gallon. A $20 - $30 a gallon paint just can't compete with these types of paints, but for a home built, on a budget, less than perfect surface, might just be what the doctor ordered. Use the best paint you can afford.

 

When you have just spent $300 to build a kayak it is pretty hard to spend that kind of money on paint when Rustoleum does an excellent job and is available most everywhere. The low cost to build is one of the big draws of my boats.  There is a big difference in these boats and the type of boats or yachts I suspect you work with. 

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Agreed it's not likely you'll need some of the high end paints, but you'll also not need a gallon either, so spending $30 a quart for the good stuff isn't so bad really.

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