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Scott Dunsworth

28 foot Crusier

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I should be ahead of my self imposed schedule by the end of the week. With all frames set, the keel batten and stem in place. Hope to get her striped up by the end of January, then wait for a weather window to epoxy.

Scott

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We got the keel batten glue up today with the temp hitting 65 and 70's in the building. I am going to remove it from the frames soon and get the bulk of the fairing done on saw horses. Just can not see myself climbing around on top of those frames :huh: with a planer in hand. I'll mark the batten from frame to frame and get the bulk of the fairing done, then reinstall for the final shaping.

My wood supplier called and my cypress is ready. I have been using a long batten, checking the frame fairness. So far she looks very good.

Wanted to start stripping next week but a remodeling job is going to get in the way, so maybe the following week.

Scott

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We got the keel batten done today except for fairing. I added width to the batten from station 7-6 to #20 to make it 10". So its 5.5 inch's wide except where the keel is going to be and there its 10". If I can find some help this weekend we will lift it from the frames and I'll start fairing for the strips.

Can someone tell me if the five minute epoxy will cure in cold weather? I was planning to start stripping her soon but forgot the strips must be glued to the stem as I go. I would use regular epoxy where the strips meet the keel batten and put a heater under the hull to cure that out. But I have to get that far first. I am still planning on laying all the strips dry except where they must be glued down to the stem and keel batten. If I can't find a way to do this in the cold I guess I'll be done till it warms up.

Scott

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Scott, I don't know about real Indiana cold but Raka 5 min epoxy cures down to pretty cold . Get yourself one of those Infrared Lamps (food lamp) from Lowe's - I use one of those all the time. The bulb isn't cheap -about 9 -10 bucks- but they are warm enough to make even regular epoxy kick off when it is cold and you need small stuff done in a hurry. Mine comes in a cheap clip on reflector so it is easy to spot over an area. I ended up prefering the clear type as opposed to red since the latter was too dim for me to see and kept on being left on all the time. The clear bulb can also be used as a general work light but they do throw off a lot of heat.PeterP

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Picked up my cypress strips yesterday. My supplier only charged me $20 to plane to 11/16ths and cut into strips. The face grade cypress was $2 a foot verses $1.60 I was paying for #2. I'll start scarfing them tonight and hope to start striping next week.

I am still going to try the new method of stripping dry with a 1/32 to 1/16 gap between the planks. I'll probably put 10 or 15 strips on and see how it looks. I can change to the edge glue method if it doesn't look right. I did some research on strip molding with FG sheathing on the woodenboat forum. Man they can get very dogmatic and insulting to each other on that forum. I thought forums were to discuss different ideas and thoughts. That forum is no place for thin skinned folks.

I am glad the folks on this forum are laid back and polite.

Scott

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The more times you insult someone else, the fewer times you talk to someone besides yourself. Usually on this forum 10 folks will give you 15 different answers.

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I hear you, Scott - I don't waste my time any more with forums where rudeness is tolerated. Thanks for the frequent updates on your project - I enjoy reading them.

I've got the strips to start on my (okay, my Wife's) new boat finally so I'll be posting pics on a new thread before long (Yes, I'll post them here - NOT on the WB forum) :)

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The problem with WBF is there's a lot of purists who think they are absolutely right. I got hammered good when I disclosed I was going to sew sails for the catamaran I built my daughter with a Singer portable I picked up used for $35. YOU CAN'T SEW SAILS WITH A DOMESTIC SEWING MACHINE Really? Oh yeah, and a ton of folks who claimed an amateur can't make sails anyway. Right. 4 oz Dacron, V-69 thread, euro 100 denim needle and the little Singer chugged along merrily, sometimes punching multiple layers for the corner patch deals. According to our experienced test pilot who took her out on the maiden voyage the sail shape looks great. Sure, some of the stitches are kinda ugly, which caused the test pilot to comment, "Zig-Zag refers to the stitch pattern, not the path of travel." Har har.

I imagine the building method you choose generated a lot of negball comments, Scott. Never fear. I seem to recall you did test layups and cut the test panels apart to see how effective it was and had good results. I would go for it.

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Got my feet wet today on the stripping :) . I spent about an hour making sure that the king plank was laying flat and fair with no edge stand. After that two of us lay ed 15 strips in about an hour. So far this is great. I was able to use plastic cap nails as spacers between the strips. Which keeps a constant 1/16 gap between each strip. I use one in between each station and the screw holds the gap at the frame. If I get the keel batten and stem fairing finished I think two of us can strip the whole boat in two days tops. I haven't started on the deck shelf yet, mostly because I need some warm weather to glue it up. So I'll have to stop the stripping well short of where the shelf go's or it will be a real pain to build. The weather is suppose to warm up by Tuesday to 60 so I hope to have most of the hull stripped by then.

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We got a mess of strips on today. Tomorrow I will glue them to the stem and put the stainless screws in. Some of the strips have their own mind inbetween the frames so I tried a strip of 1/4 inch ply inbetween the frames and it does pull them fair.

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Finished scarfing my strips today, ( around 900 scarfs ) well I hope so anyway. I won't know till the last one goes on. Only have about 2 dozen strips left in the pile I started with and they were the least desirable ones. I can use them if I need to, but in order to make a 30 footer out of them they will need 6 or 7 scarfs.

The nearly two hundred pound roll of 17 oz. bi axle arrived last week. I got some fast harder to go with the resin I already had, so that should help speed things up in the cold building.

Just maybe we can finish stripping this tub next week.

Scott

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:) I got an email that asked about the 900 scarfs and I thought maybe I should explain a bit. They couldn't see how there could be anywhere near that many. So here's the answer. There's around 128, 30 foot strips. My stock came in 10 foot lengths. So by the time you square the ends and add a 8 to 1 scarf at each end of each piece of stock you now have a length of around 9 feet. So each finished 30 foot strip has at least 4 joints. Which adds up to 8 cut scarfs per 30 foot strip, before they are glued up. So the math is 8x128= 1024. Now in all fairness I did do some batches where I didn't scarf one end knowing that there will be fall off at the transom and bow. So the total is not quite accurate, but I would guess within 20 %.

I know it sounds insane but it is what it is :) .

So I hope this clears up what I meant by around 900 scarfs. I didn't what you all to think I was hitting the Rum to hard :unsure: or only had one year of math. :)

If I had not run across the scarfing jig idea, I would still be on the second batch of strips or sharping my bench plane.

I ended up being able to make 20 to 30 scarfs at a time in the jig depending on the mix of wide and narrow strips.

For a few scarfs I would have just used the bench plane, but for a large amount the jig is heaven sent cheap tool. I also used my dust collector's 4 inch hose to suck up most of the mess while using the router.

Scott

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Hey Scott,

Are you using a fixture to glue the scarfs? I'm planning to do mine on a less industrial scale (much smaller boat) by cutting a few scarfs a day, gluing a few and installing a strip on the boat. If I just do each operation once a day I might not go nuts. There will only be 22 or 23 strips per side on this boat.

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