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Scott Dunsworth

28 foot Crusier

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I visited our designer this week and have enough of the plans to get the hull built. SO All I have to do is get started. I have a building now to build her in. Down side it has a gravel floor and no heat. I'll build the jig and then level it with a transit. Probably build the jig this week and start the temporary frame next. I talked with Graham about the speed strip method and decided that's the way to go, we'll see in the end. I believe it will save me weeks of work on the hull. Since I will be using the speed strip method I can strip her during the cold weather and epoxy her when it warms up again. I can use my heated shop to build the frames and stem.

She has nearly 28 feet of water line with a 9'9" beam. A walk out transom that is a modified sugar scoop. She carries 451 sq feet of sail, not counting a staysail. The cabin is long and the cockpit is no larger than my Belhaven not counting the swim platform. About a four foot draft with a fixed keel which I can live with. Anyway she is going to be started this week.

If Graham wasn't to busy I would have him post the sail plan.

Scott

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That's great news Scott - Keep us posted.

What's the "speed strip" method? Suddenly I'm afraid to start my next boat using the old, slow, way (yes, I'll share pics when there are some).

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Ken I called it the speed strip method, but its actually not. I will plank the whole hull before a drop of epoxy is mixed. There will be a small gap about the thickness of a butter knife between each strip. Once the hull is planked and temporally held fair I will fill the gaps with mico ballons and epoxy. Once she is glued up I will remove all the screws and whatever temporary fasteners that were needed to hold the strips fair. Then while the epoxy is still green, finish filling any gaps and screw hole remaining with the same mixture. Once she is cured its time to cut the shear line and build the deck shelf. Then all the fun starts of fairing and sanding.

So I will be able to strip her up this winter and wait for a weather window to do the epoxy.

Scott

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Mike I seen his ideas on stripping but not on epoxy. I seen this method a while back by someone else, on another web site.

Scott

I know where I saw this conversation before - right here!

http://messing-about...h__1#entry65121

Mark himself replied in the thread.

Sheesh - the memory, it ain't what it used to be... we're trapped in the world of circular references!

Mike

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...I will plank the whole hull before a drop of epoxy is mixed. There will be a small gap about the thickness of a butter knife between each strip. Once the hull is planked and temporally held fair I will fill the gaps with micro balloons and epoxy...

Cool - I've just started a boat for my wife that uses the more common strip method. I'll probably rely on the fiberglass to protect my glue joints, though. My current plan is to use titebond to join the strips. It'll probably be a very slow project. I built the strongback for the boat just days before I (finally) got a job. I haven't touched the "boat" since then, but I'll post pictures when there's anything interesting to show.

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Well it's official now, I started my cruiser today. Cut out some frame patterns from luan and faired them. Pretty easy tracing from the Mylar with carbon paper. I'll work on them all week and build the jig next. Anyway nothing to see for awhile. When I get the frames set I'll post a pic.

Scott

PS Graham carbon paper is still around at office supply stores.

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Scott, if your wife sews she probably has one in her kit - a little ponce wheel for tracing out patterns. Run it along the line and it leaves a series of pinpricks. She won't mind you borrowing it especially if you don't ask her. PeterP

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Thanks Peter, she had one but it was junk. The wheel flopped around like it had five loose lug nuts and its points weren't sharp enough. Scott

Scott, opportunity knocks! Get your wife a nice quality spiky wheel and make her a believer in fine tools! Next time you haul a $$$ fine tool home she'll understand and approve instead of .... *shriek*

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Some of us gals like gift certificates to hardware stores and boat supply stores. :wub:

Glad to hear that the carbon paper is working. I had out my dressmaker's tracing paper to send to you, Scott, but it was pink...matches my doilies pretty well. :D

Glad to see you are back in the building game, but sorry to see The Yellow Boat go before our match race... #3 vs. #44.

Kyle

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Things are going slower than I had expected. I have the first three frames together, they take awhile. About 2 to 3 hours apiece. By the time you draw out the pattern on the Luann, cut it out, then make the frame from one by, cut it out, then match them up and fair them into a perfect mirror of each other, then put the frame together it just takes awhile. But only eight more to go. I'll get the stem glued up tomorrow. Hopefully a couple more frames together.

My wood supplier for the cypress will plane 700 board feet of it to 11/16th's and cut it into strips for me for only about $50 dollars extra. So I think I'll go for that deal.

Scott

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The small ducks are lining up :) , my Belhaven is sold :(. I have a only a couple more frames to build and a like new Beta 20 horse is in the shop waiting. Over the next few weeks I'll start lining them up on the jig. The cypress strips are on the way. Watching my Belhaven roll down the road was sad, but boosted the motivation quite a few notches.

It sure looks like a long road ahead.

Scott

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I have got the jig nearly done but still have a few frames to build. Responsibilities keep getting in the way or I would be ready to start striping by now. My wood supplier is backed up on orders and told me yesterday it will be another three weeks before my cypress is ready. So I'll spend the time wisely and get the jig set up. I plan to use a long batten and check and tweak the jig for any high or low places. My building has a gravel floor so I used a transit to level the jig. We have a lot of space in this shop but no heat so I use my small shop for building parts.

My wife asked me last night when I came in, I thought you where only going to be in the shop a few hours? I told her I was, she said you need to look at the clock, oh well I was only 5 hours. Most women don't understand the concept of time.

I am not going to try not to bore you with a flood of pictures but I will post some when I turn a corner of the build.

Scott

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My wife asked me last night when I came in, I thought you where only going to be in the shop a few hours? I told her I was, she said you need to look at the clock, oh well I was only 5 hours. Most women don't understand the concept of time.

When my son was 4 he was getting impatient with his mother when told to "wait a minute" when he asked her for or to do something. One day, unknown by her, he sat patiently timing her with the clock on the wall after being told to "wait a minute". He announced that day that a "mommy minute" was 42 minutes long.

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Further proof that time is not constant. An "hour" spent in the shop cutting jigs etc. is 5 hours. Look up and the hands on the clock have jumped. On the other hand, 30 minutes waiting for epoxy to kick or the mailman to bring the plans you are looking for seems like 5 hours. Watch the clock and the hands are frozen.

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