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Best 4-Stroke Outboard


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  #1 timgoz

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Posted 28 September 2010 - 08:31 AM

Hello,

I'd like opinions on what you all prefer as to the make of 4-Stroke outboards in the 25hp. range. The application I am intending is for a cockpit well mounted unit in a 26ft. LOA cabin cruiser, (Redwing 26).

I'm leaning towards a Honda but am open to suggestions, hence this post.

Thanks.

Tim G.

  #2 dale

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Posted 28 September 2010 - 08:29 PM

Not an expert by  any means, but we do have a Honda thread going on over on TSBB - smaller versions though, 8-10hp.  Someone over there just commented after cruising for a whole year, that they see more Yamahas by far than anything else, followed by Mercury.  Again, they may be referring to a little smaller motor as auxilliary for sailboats.

  #3 Docpal

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Posted 29 September 2010 - 06:35 AM

Years ago I owned a towing/salvage company in the Florida keys. In ten years we never once towed in a Yamaha powered vessel.....

  #4 Ray Frechette Jr

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Posted 29 September 2010 - 06:11 PM

Years ago I owned a towing/salvage company in the Florida keys. In ten years we never once towed in a Yamaha powered vessel.....


And what was Yamaha's Market share of Outboard Boats in Florida Keys??

  #5 Docpal

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Posted 29 September 2010 - 06:15 PM

Most of the guys who made their living on the water used them...

  #6 Ray Frechette Jr

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Posted 29 September 2010 - 06:26 PM

would you guess perhaps 20 % of outboards had them??

Guys earning their living also would see more use and fresher fuel and less likely for crud to form in gas or ethanol to phase separate too.  They also likely would keep a closer eye on them as they realize their lives depend on them getting home by them.



  #7 Docpal

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Posted 29 September 2010 - 07:04 PM

No way to guess the number as there were SO many different marinas, ramps, bulkhead davits, etc., but walking through the sport fishing docks they were pre dominant. And I'd agree that they probably did more frequent, ( and more thorough) upkeep on their motors, but they also used them 5-6 days a week, while the weekend warriors might get a few hours in on their days off...


  #8 Ray Frechette Jr

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Posted 30 September 2010 - 04:29 AM

Daily use has it's benefits.  Gas is definitely kept cleaner with daily use.

  #9 Frank Hagan

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Posted 01 October 2010 - 11:16 AM

Speaking of gas, anyone know how the newer outboards handle ethanol in gas?  I know it has caused havoc with older outboards (and tanks), with gunk being dissolved in the tanks and fouling the engines.  Also, I guess some components on outboards can be damaged by ethanol.

  #10 Craig

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Posted 01 October 2010 - 01:41 PM

Frank it never seemed to bother my Honda 9.9.  When I sold the boat I kept the motor.  I love it, especially the electric starter.  Over winter gas never seemed to her it either.   8) 8) 8)

  #11 Ray Frechette Jr

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Posted 01 October 2010 - 02:57 PM

Speaking of gas, anyone know how the newer outboards handle ethanol in gas?  I know it has caused havoc with older outboards (and tanks), with gunk being dissolved in the tanks and fouling the engines.  Also, I guess some components on outboards can be damaged by ethanol.


Ethanol in gas is simply problematic in outboards period.

Ethanol forms a major component of the octane of ethanol contaminated gasoline.

For boats left in the Marine environment where high ambient humidity exists and large diurnal temperature shifts occur,  humidity in air gets sucked in as temps cool and then condenses on tank walls and gets mixed in the gas ethanol blend.  Once a critical level of moisture gets entrained the ethanol and water drops out of suspension.

The resulting gas floating on top is octane deprived.  The glug of water ethanol below does not burn well.

That is irrespective of issues with ethanol dissolving pre existing varnishes etc.

Running engine on octane deficient fuel can cause detonation.

I advocate to all power boaters to buy ethanol free gas if at all possible.

And to always buy the highest octane fuel for use on their boats and to have an installed fuel filter with water separator.







  #12 Guest_River Runner_*

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Posted 02 October 2010 - 12:00 PM

This spring I bought a F25L Yamaha - a four stroke 25 hp. I now have over 440.5 trouble free hours on the motor. It's only 2 cylinder vs Honda and Mercury/Tohatsu which are three. Yamaha uses a single carb, Honda 3 carbs and Tohatsu is fuel injected. I like the simplicity of the single carb. The 3 cylinder motors may run smoother but Yamaha uses a balancing piston and I'm happy with the smoothness. Suzuki make a V twin. I've never actually seen one.

I agree that I see more Yamaha motors than any other brand.

  #13 Cricket

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Posted 03 October 2010 - 02:24 PM

Hi Folks,
I'll weigh in here. Last year I did my research, and ended up buying a Honda 30 for our club's Boston Whaler. The choice was between the Yamaha 25, Honda 25-30, and Evinrude 25 (fuel injected 2 stroke, a different technology). The Yamaha dealer wanted to sell me one of his last 2 strokes, because of the light weight. He was worried about the extra weight and not enough power in the top end with the 4. I went with the Honda largely because I felt like it would stand up better to a lot of low speed maneuvering. I use it primarily as a race committee boat, and support boat. Also, all of the police and park RIB's use the Honda. We felt it would be better over the long haul.

After two season's use (though only 50 hrs), I have no complaints at all. Its quiet, powerful, reliable. One note: the only difference in the 25 and 30 is the carburetor. I'll take the extra five at the top end any day. Yamaha did not have a 30.

Jim Luton

  #14 Hirilonde

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Posted 03 October 2010 - 02:39 PM

When I was choosing an outboard for my Renegade I went through this whole comparison thing myself.  I talked with fishermen, yachters, mechanics and anyone who would listen to me or give an opinion.  No one agreed on anything.  I concluded the best thing I could do was choose the best, or most convenient dealer near me and buy what ever it sold.  At the time I worked at a boatyard with a Honda franchise.  So I bought one.

  #15 Tom Lathrop

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Posted 06 October 2010 - 06:00 PM

When I was choosing an outboard for my Renegade I went through this whole comparison thing myself.  I talked with fishermen, yachters, mechanics and anyone who would listen to me or give an opinion.  No one agreed on anything.  I concluded the best thing I could do was choose the best, or most convenient dealer near me and buy what ever it sold.  At the time I worked at a boatyard with a Honda franchise.  So I bought one.


All the newer outboards seem to be good enough that I would choose based on getting the size I wanted and the dealer.  That is how close and customer relations of the dealer.  Price can be a factor but I would not buy from the internet or a far away dealer if a local one was available.  New outboards are very reliable but also more complicated than the old ones.




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