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PeterP

Princess Sharpie 28

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Dale, I asked Graham that very same question and he did not think it would be a problem.The cedar is pretty wimpy and the cumulative stress is negligible. PeterP 

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Hi Peter,

Enjoying watching the progress on your new boat.

I am beginning my long term early planning for my next boat and I was wondering (if I can ask this on this forum) why you finally decided to go with the P28 instead of the NIS26? I have read quite a bit on them both and I think they are both very fine. By Graham's own admission though the P26 (the forefather of your design I suppose) is not a boat you would want to take around the Horn, whereas the NIS26 appears to be tested in just that. I should say the NIS23 has at least passed the test of some rough waters in South Australia.

Here in Alaska the Gulf can get really freaky...and I am thinking that for me to go inter island I would like to have a bit better bluewater capability.

If you have two minutes could you share your thoughts on what persuaded you to go with the P28 over the NIS?

Thanks much.

Bob

Alaska

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Bob, there were several factors involved. I bought a set of plans for NIS 26 from Tom Lathrop a good while back before Graham started thinking about larger designs of his own. One day we were talking about my plans and Graham just happen to mention that he did not think the stability curves for the NIS were that great. In all fairness this is  an older design. By this time I had also heard that Kirby was not very accessible with regards to problems, questions etc. And I really wanted a round bilger.  I go way back with Graham - I've built four of his designs over the past 19+ years so I know that if I go with his design it will be as good as it gets and he'll back me up during the build. So when when the word got out that he was doodling with bigger Princesses I was ready to leap in. The 28 looks just the right size for what I am capable of doing -comfortably. Which is to cruise the four corners with my wife plus an extra bunk for one of my daughters if they want to join us for a few days. Ride on a trailer to get there. Perhaps Cuba, Bahamas and few of the Islands. Big enough to hold two weeks worth of grub so we won't have to anchor behind Piggly Wiggly all the time. Much better performer than NIS for the capable and definitely better stability curves if you not. If I ever get the itch to go to Greece or Tierra del Fuego I would look into getting there as deck cargo. PeterP

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Thanks Perer. That is good enough for me.

Best of luck as you progress. I am jealous that I just finished my first boat.

Thanks also for sharing your build with us all.

Bob

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Wow! Good to see a P28 coming together. I actually have a flutter of envy in my stomach even though I know I could not handle the amount of work it would take. I will anxiously keep track of your progress. Based on your description of the kind of sailing you plan, she should be perfect for you.

Best wishes for your project.

Garry

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Hmm - I've been hoping that someone, anyone might post a lines drawing of the P28, or at least a description of how it differs from the P26. Did I miss something?

Thanks,

Mike

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Hmm - I've been hoping that someone, anyone might post a lines drawing of the P28, or at least a description of how it differs from the P26. Did I miss something?

Thanks,

Mike

Well,  It is 2 ft longer....

But I two would enjoy seeing the accomodations plan to see what you get extra inside...

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Here are a couple of sketches I made a few years ago that show what you might be able to achieve. I may have been a little over the top but Graham didn't seem to choke on the design possibilities. You should be able to get 5'-9" headroom.

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I am sorry to be a little late with my reply. I had to go out of town last week. I do not have  a complete set of drawings in hand to post. What I have is a set of full size half breadths and scantlings for the hull. The plan is to glue up the hull, glass it and turn it over. In general terms the 28 is a stretched out 26 is a stretched 24 and so forth. But that is like saying that Beef Bourguignon is only a stew. The simple fact that the 28 is round bilge means the boat was practically redesigned in practical terms. Also, even though I do not have stuff drawn up I have a clear picture in my mind as to the final product. Small diesel is in the works. There will be no pilot house( as practical as they may be). Decreased windage for towing and simpler to accommodate horizontal masts without them. Pretty standard cabin lay out. Rotating masts with sleeve luffs and wishbones. Lot of details to be worked out yet but like they say: every journey begins begins with a single step. My destination may not be precisely defined but I am already huffing and puffing towards it. PeterP

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I am really enjoying your pictures of your boat!! But I am also intrested in the high tech shelter you are building in! I won't be building that size "dream boat" but I do need to build a shelter. Probably going to build in the 12-15 foot range. Haven't made up my mind yet, probably do that at Mess About next week. I have a 16 foot shed I could build next to I guess.

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Sorry I am so late with a response - I just got back from a trip. The shelter is a real cheapie. It is made out of salvaged 5/4 treated lumber ( sides)  2x4 spruce rafters on 2' centers, and 14' wide roll of greenhouse plastic. Including the screws holding it together I don't think I have  $200 in it. The size is approx 14x32' and if I could find the room in it to swing a leg I would kick myself for not making it larger. It is slapped on the side of my shop. In realtor speak you could describe it this way: Architecturally, it blends in quite naturally with the rest of the "semi-developed" backyard and lends it an air of industry and serious effort. ( read: not a total eye sore/ junkyard). The plastic is the key. My first shelter disintegrated in a year because of cheap plastic. It was a major mess with flakes of the stuff littering the yard. After I re-covered it with a better material - it held out for almost 10 years.  But even the best of plastic is no match for ice and heavy snow. I'll be at the meet if you have any other questions. PeterP

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Well, things have slowed down considerably but we are moving. I've had a two week break and there was the get together. Now I am putting  10ft bay window in the house to keep the love of my life in good cheer. But despite all that I try to do something on the boat every day ( or so). The port side being almost all planked up, I decided to try my hand at sanding. Sanding being right up there with all the other uninspiring jobs I thought I would jazz things up a little and made myself a 9x11 platten for Mr Hog - my 9" sander/polisher. See pics bellow. I also made a 24" flexible longboard out of some 12oz cloth I had laying around. I hate to use the word fun in association with sanding but taking Mr Hog for a spin with a full sheet of 80 grit paper at 3000rpm made for a lively two hours to say the least. That is how long it took to get the whole side smooth. Not fair but smooth. Also, the longboard is finally up to the task. It started out too flexible so I had to go back a couple of times with additional laminations of 12oz cloth. Now I have to do some tweaking on my arms, they are woefully underpowered as I have found out. Looking for a 1.5HP power pack for each arm. PeterP

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You can purchase air powered long boards, there might even be electric ones, but I have never seen one.  The air powered are expensive.  With 28 feet of boat to sand, it might be worth it though.

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The handles on the longboard are pieces of a broken old maul handle. Slant and twist for maximum comfort in my preferred sanding position. However, if you decide to switch hands it is not that natural anymore. As for the paper: I started with a roll of 3M Gold 80 grit because that is all they had in gold. I've since ordered some 60 grit on E paper because the 80 wasn't fast enough. Also, for shaping, I've stuck on some 36grit floor refinishing paper. That stuff is only 18in long though- bit shorter than my board. The 2 3/4 rolls are stick on. For my sheets and other stuff I've been using 3M spray on fabric adhesive. Not because of preference but because I already had it. It works well - too well if you don't watch out and put too much on. In fact a good part of my sanding time involves removing old 9x11 sheets -which I have to spray individually-from my big sander. But it is all worth the effort. That sander really goes to work for me.PeterP

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I totally missed David's suggestion about the air powered boards until I posted the previous reply. I did look at those and the price scared me. Also, vast majority of the boat is machine sandable with what I already have- it is only the hard turn of the bilge that needs to be done by a board. Besides, the way I huff and puff while longboarding you could argue I am air powered.

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Well finally, the last stick was put in place! If I look like I am kneeling then it very nicely sums up my feelings at that moment. Thank goodness it is done. Since I have been sanding like mad in between glue ups I have a good part of the boat (almost) ready for glass. Believe you me I am ready to flip this thing. Two pictures of the boat and one of a home made screw extractor are attached. The keel batten in the boat is Ipe - beautiful - straight as a shot- no knots - hard as nails - dense. Only problem -it loves to eat my drywall screws. If you don't pre- drill the screw is in for good. So I lost a few and to dig them out I made this extractor out of a tension pin from Lowes ($1.8 for two) The teeth aren't much to look at but it works very well. PeterP

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Well, you have the hull built now :D  Just need to sand it a bit :lol:  I can see progress since last week.  Glad that longboard doesn't belong to me.  If that kind of work can't be done with a sander, I can't do it.  Sometimes I can be thankful for arthritis.

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