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Pete McCrary

A dodger for a Core Sound 20 Mk 3 . .

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This dodger may be the first for a CS20.3.  Perhaps Dough or Jay has one for their boats, but I haven't heard of it.  I've admired Graham's dodger installed on Carlita, his CS17.3.  To me, it seems an essential item for a cruising boat.  Here I'll record the details of the modifications required and its installation.

 

Here are a couple of pixs of Carlita's dodger.

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Graham provided dimensional drawings for a dodger to fit B & B's CS20.3 design.  He also sent full-scale drawings (on Mylar) of the coaming pieces and location on the cabin roof and sliding hatch garage.

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I marked the outlines on 4mm marine ply with carbon paper.  Once cut out, they fitted very nicely to the cabin roof.

 

Notice the second laminate is made up of multiple scrap pieces.
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The position on the cabin roof was marked with an awl through the Mylar pattern.

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The B & B drawings also specified the angles (130 degrees over the garage and 8 degrees from plumb at the cabin bulkhead (Blk 3).  Using these angles, blocking was cut against which the coaming pieces could be held while the thickened epoxy cured.  The coaming was held in place near the front with "#6 washer-hex-head 3/4" screws and clamps on the straighter part near Blk 3.

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The coaming was first "tac-welded" in place.  Then the second laminate of 4mm ply was cut and fitted up against the aft side of the first laminate.  I didn't have enough large pieces of 4mm, so the second laminate was made up of several scrap pieces, 3 on the port side, and 5 on starboard.  After the first laminate was completely glued up and filleted (epoxy cured) -- the second laminate was glued with generous application of thickened epoxy and held in place with all the spring clamps that I had in the shop.

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The above pix was taken just after the tac-welding had cured.

 

Before applying two coats of neat epoxy I cut the holes for the mast lines coming aft.  Three are needed on starboard and two at port.  The larger one on the port side is for two reefing downhauls.  They share the same  deck pulley and cleat because only one line is used at a time.  Here are photos of the coaming ready for installation of the dodger.

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Chessie will be trailered to the canvas shop tomorrow morning.  It's my plan to discuss the following features with Dave, the canvas guy.

 

1.  It should be easily folded down to the cabin roof while under sail with some means to keep it from popping up in a gust and/or wave action.

2.. It will need a cover of some sort (in its folded position) in order to (a) keep the sun off it while boat is trailered & stowed in the driveway, and (b) also to secure it [the folded dodger] to the cabin roof while at highway speeds & headwinds.

3. It should not be necessary to disassemble [the whole dodger] for road transport.

4. For off-season boat maintenance purposes, the leading and side ages of the canvas should be attached to the coaming so as to make its removal fairly easy.  Maybe attached with "button snaps" or "turn buttons".  And the canvas top should be attached to the two SS tubes by means of zippers.

 

I'll post photos of the finished product.  And make a report of its usefulness on my scheduled cruise with the Shallow Water Sailors on May 4-6 (their 39th annual cruise on the Chesapeake).

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You will really like the dodger.  Our other boat has a dodger and I wouldn’t want a cruising boat without one.   I have considered it, we have taken green water over the bow at times in our cruising grounds and a dodger would be nice then.  I breakwater is a nice addition.   But I am a tall guy, with “big bones”, a full dodgerwould restrict my access to the cabin.  

 

Sailing season son on the south coast, ya’ll come on down! 

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I bought a dodger kit from sailrite for my original 17.  Just watching the video instructions took about 3 hrs, so I'm sure the actual making is going to take some time.  Looking at this gave me some good ideas, too.  I won't be able to start until I bring the boat home from winter storage.  We'll see.  Nothing ventured...

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Chessie is at the canvas shop and we have a contract for the dodger.  After discussions with Dave, we decided on the following:

 

^  The canvas will be attached to the coaming with "turn-buttons."  The attachment hardware [the male part] will be thrubolted to the edge of the coaming with machine screws, washers, and [on the aft side] acorn nuts.  If necessary, they could be removed for repair or repainting the coaming.

 

^  It will be possible to easily fold the dodger forward to the cabin roof while under sail.  To prevent chafing of the canvas and [the] coaming (by the collapsed tubing) chaffing gear will be added to the pressure points.

 

^  Dave strongly suggested that the dodger not be mounted (even in its collapsed position) while trailering on the highway.  He was not confident that a boot could be made that would effectively hold seady and protect the assembly at highway speeds (occasional 70 mph + headwind).  Alternatively, he explained that the whole assembly could be easily disassembled.  The canvas is attached to the tubbing with zippers, and to the coaming with turn-buttons.  And the tubbing assembly is removed with just a pair of pins.  To remove the whole assembly -- one needs only to remove two pins and the turn buttons on the coaming.  He will make a "dust cover" for the assembly, and it can be stowed in the cabin or cockpit when trailering or [in off season] my garage attic.  This will save the cost of a boot made of expensive Sunbrella.

 

^  We are considering a way to "tension" the dodger when deployed.  Usually that's done by attaching the canvas "ear-flaps" to the outside of the cockpit coaming with snaps or other means.  We wanted the tension to be adjustable to account for stretching of the canvas over time.  To keep the hardware to a minimum I've suggested the following design concept:

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That's about it for now.  Next week I'll approve the fabrication of the tubing and location of trhe webbing guides.  After that, the dodger should be completed by sometime in early March.  Photos will be posted.

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Looks great Pete. I'm planning on adding the breakwater, and I'll use the boat for a bit before deciding on a dodger. They sure do make a great rain cover for the hatch. 

 

I do wonder what Graham has to say about towing with the dodger folded. I have a power boat with a Bimini that has a cover that keeps it from flapping and I don't see a problem. Adding the time to put it up will just add more time to setup.

 

 

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A bungee cord, sewed into the hem of the "wing", with a "hog ring" clamp securing a little loop on this cord, can work for the tie down.

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A good looking dodger and coaming. With respect to a tie down strap I suggest you use an adjustable nylon strap or cord directly from the aft bow to the cockpit coaming. The aft bow needs quite a bit of tension to keep the top of the dodger taut enough to shed water. Pulling down on the side curtain itself doesn't do the trick in my experience. 

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9 hours ago, Beacher said:

A good looking dodger and coaming. With respect to a tie down strap I suggest you use an adjustable nylon strap or cord directly from the aft bow to the cockpit coaming. The aft bow needs quite a bit of tension to keep the top of the dodger taut enough to shed water. Pulling down on the side curtain itself doesn't do the trick in my experience. 

 

That's basically the same advice given [me] by Dave (Potomac Canvas Co), my dodger fabricator.  Thanks for the timely comment.

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The dodger on my old Renegade used snaps along the combing with an adjustable webbing (much like the sketch) at the very corner to keep the tension on the snaps to a minimum at this stress point.

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