Jump to content
Malwarebytes Endpoint Security
Advanced endpoint protection (affiliate link).
Kennneee

Fuel Tanks, Splash well, Windows...

Recommended Posts

Kennneee    9

Hi All- More questions for the Bluejacket Brain Trust.  Time for me to find a fuel tank for my OB26 build.  Going back and forth on plastic vs aluminum, which I am sure some of you have done as well.  I am familiar with the potential for odors from plastic and possible corrosion from aluminum.  Any input from your experience including tips on venting the tank space would be greatly appreciated.

I am likely to use either a Yamaha or Suzuki 90 for power.  I am wondering if anybody can give dimensions on the depth of the splashwell needed for these motors? Any input on preference for either brand?

 Build or buy pilot house windows? I know some have had issues with home built windows leaking and being noisy.  Your thoughts and experience would be helpful.

Is there a support group for guys that have trouble painting over wood?  I spent years in the tropics aboard my sailboat chasing brightwork maintenance.  Actually my wife took care of that end of things until we painted over the wood (ouch). Now, in British Columbia and fully intending not to have bright work on this boat, my hands are quivering at the thought of painting over the beautiful Occume cabin sides. Coatings have gotten better,  less sun are the rationalization I am using.  Anybody want to talk me off of this cliff? Anybody else want to discuss this affliction? Confidentiality assured:).

Thanks again for the help!!

Cheers,

Ken

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Oyster    16

Folks can write a book on your inquiry.  I will summarize  on a couple of things, as I have just finished locking things in, and will attempt to create a short and concise answer relating to my opinions and needs later on this evening.  Quick question though, are you planning on using a 20 or 25 inch shaft engine? Oh don't be foolish. Paint your exterior and trim out with some lipstick if you desire showy wood.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kennneee    9

Oyster,

A little late in the game to not be foolish. The engine will have a 25" shaft. Thanks.

cheers,

Ken

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Oyster    16
2 hours ago, Kennneee said:

Oyster,

A little late in the game to not be foolish. The engine will have a 25" shaft. Thanks.

cheers,

Ken

Okay, jump. ;<}} Occume is not what I know as a durable veneer without glassing at the least. While it may be fine for small stuff, overtime unless you glass it you may see some serious problems with it.  It has a tenancy to check for starters, longiitual lines even under paint.  And if you glass it you will need to do multiple coats on it and then sand a fair amount before applying a UV resistant finish. So all your seams and related joints needs to have different fillers in the building stage, unless of course you have achieved your furniture building skills when building the hull.  If not you will get yellowing. Now there are some special coatings hardener that reduces some of this.  More later

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kennneee    9

Oyster,

Yep, planning to glass with 6oz using DWX epoxy. Duckworks claims it has UV inhibitors but I don't totally trust that.  I have had really good luck with BRISTOL as a long lasting and durable top coat. Keep the comments coming!

cheers,

Ken

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Oyster    16

My 02 cents worth, FWIW

 

Hi All- More questions for the Bluejacket Brain Trust.  Time for me to find a fuel tank for my OB26 build.  Going back and forth on plastic vs aluminum, which I am sure some of you have done as well.  I am familiar with the potential for odors from plastic and possible corrosion from aluminum.  Any input from your experience including tips on venting the tank space would be greatly appreciated.

 

Most people do not vent the fuel tank coffins. If you have gas smells in that area, then you will have a problem of safety.  The leaching is bothersome with the plastics. But reports are that most of the issues have been cured, or so says the so called experts. But I still have a real problem with the expansion and contraction issues.  But one big issue that I do know about is that in small spaces and areas of limited room where there is some build up of heat, over a period of time the changes of shape of the plastic tanks can cause the fuel gauge screws to release and leaks of raw fuel can occur.

 

I am likely to use either a Yamaha or Suzuki 90 for power.  I am wondering if anybody can give dimensions on the depth of the splashwell needed for these motors? Any input on preference for either brand?

 

The best choice of outboard is one that you can get serviced locally. See if you can get some imput from other customers of any and all dealers in your area that you intend on buying from. See if they have had any warranty issues and how did the dealer respond to them.  With cable steering or the NFB steering units, if you go that route, 33” is what I use. But you can also make your well width smaller and create a pocket on the port side in line with the cable steering end to stick in on a hard right turn. I don’t know what Graham drew on the plans, or if he gave you a size.  With the 25 inch shaft, your motor well pocket can be higher. This is a trial and error deal unless of course you create a template. If you plan on using the manual locking arm with the engine up, you will need to have the well lower.

 

 Build or buy pilot house windows? I know some have had issues with home built windows leaking and being noisy.  Your thoughts and experience would be helpful.

 

Buying the windows is an expensive direction. They are also heavy from making your own, where weight is a consideration. Personally I don't like the look in these types of boats. When making your own be patient with the steps. Install copper tubing flared at the ends and enlay the tubes in thickened epoxy in an oversized hole drilled in the cabin sides. Then tab over the tube after you grind it flush.  You can use starboard for your track too. But metal track is avaliable, but can corrode over time. So install them in a decent caulk and without screws and you will have less problems then when salt has a raw edge of the screw holes in which to begin to corrode and pucker up the metal.

 

Is there a support group for guys that have trouble painting over wood?  I spent years in the tropics aboard my sailboat chasing brightwork maintenance.  Actually my wife took care of that end of things until we painted over the wood (ouch). Now, in British Columbia and fully intending not to have bright work on this boat, my hands are quivering at the thought of painting over the beautiful Occume cabin sides. Coatings have gotten better,  less sun are the rationalization I am using.  Anybody want to talk me off of this cliff? Anybody else want to discuss this affliction? Confidentiality assured:).

Thanks again for the help!!

Cheers,

Ken

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ken_Potts    58

Just a personal aesthetic opinion:  I love the look of wood grain but I like the look of a veneer much more on a piece of furniture than on the outside of a boat (it's pretty, but I just don't think it looks quite right). I prefer to paint plywood and leave some nice clear wood highlights on things like coamings and hatch covers.  When I first saw how beautiful the grain was on the okume ply I used to build my CS17 I hesitated a bit about painting over it but I went ahead and painted and I never regretted it.  I built hatch covers and a coaming that had nice alternating patterns of ash and walnut and pretty much left it at that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ejds    16

I don't know about Canadian rules but for the US Coast Guard the gas tank area needs to be vented if the tank is plastic.  My original plastic Moeller tank manufactured early 2012 stank.  Later plastic tanks have an extra coating which suppose to eliminate the smell.  I did change the tank to a higher capacity custom made aluminium tank   They included instructions to prevent oxidation   The gas tank under the cockpit is fairly easy to remove for inspection or whatever.

For the vent I used 3" vent hose.  The intake is a louver facing forward in the hull side and the exhaust ends in the splash well via an exhaust blower.  Speaking of venting while you are at it think about battery areas if you plan to use lead acid. 

For the rest just listen to Oyster.

Egbert

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kennneee    9

Egbert- thanks for the input. Any pics of your tank installation and venting? Your choices make a good case for an aluminum tank. Don't need to do it twice. Did you add foam for floatation?  I have assumed that I would use some rigid foam under the cockpit deck but I am having second thoughts.  The price here is absurd for the foam and not sure if it is the best path anyway.  Might build airtight floatation chambers instead. Any thoughts appreciated.

Cheers,

Ken

  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ejds    16

The charm about a custom made tank is the possibility for a greater capacity in the same space.   

https://www.flickr.com/photos/ejds33/  Scrolling down are a couple of pictures of the new tank and way down the install of the old tank  I don't think I have any of the venting specific. 

 

I do have flotation foam under the cockpit and pilot house floors as per Tom's plans,  the blue rigid foam.   I personally don't like completely closed spaces   I'm just not sure any moisture can't get in there and start to cause rot in a dead air space.

I looked at your woodworking  pictures and your work looks stunning.  Reminds me of a neighbor we used to have and the woodwork he does.  

Egbert

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DaveH    1

To all,

 

Please  seriously follow Egbert's recommendation to vent lead acid battery compartments.  

 

A battery story:  

 

My golf cart has six 6V batteries.  A few years ago my cart was struggling up a long steep hill with three on board.  By the time I got to the hill top the unmistakable smell of melting electrical wire insulation was present.  Not the first time this has happened and usually means a battery cable  nut is loose on a terminal thus creating resistance/heat.  I remove the seat covering the batteries, found  the smoldering cable and wiggle it to check the cable to bolt connection.   

 

The explosion blew apart the battery top exposing the plates, sprayed my arm with battery acid and the sound caused  ringing in my ears for 12 hours.    Since I was bent over at the waist checking the battery with my face about two feet above the battery terminal I'm amazed that my face wasn't hit by plastic fragments or sprayed with battery acid.  This was one of those days I'm glad I wear glasses full time. 

 

Before each use of my cart,  I now check all battery cable connections for tightness. 

 

Post mortem:

 

At the hill top, by removing the seat before checking the batteries, I would think that any hydrogen in the compartment would  have mostly dissipated before  I wiggled the cable.  

 

The terminal is just a bolt  set in goo that holds it in electrical connection  with a plate.  The goo had melted and when I wiggled the cable perhaps the dislodged bolt rubbed against the plate and created a spark inside the battery.    My theory is that the battery had a rapid build up of hydrogen that didn't have sufficient time to vent through the caps thus the explosion.  

 

When seeing bubbles in the electrolyte during charging I understand that gases are being created.   The literature says that hydrogen gas is normally not given off during severe battery discharge.  Is sulphur dioxide given off during discharge and is it explosive?  

 

I can only guess what caused the explosion but with absolute certainty I can attest to the violent consequences.  All battery compartments on my Bluejacket will be vented and never again will I stick my face over a troubled battery without wearing full face protection.  I am one very lucky guy in regards to what could have been. 

 

Before my battery explosion, you could count me among those exhibiting cavalier behavior around lead acid batteries. I now view them as  a potential bomb. 

 

Regards,

Dave 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kennneee    9

Yikes! Changed the battery in my motorcycle today and had a new respect for the " acid bomb" that I swapped out. Thanks Dave.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tom Lathrop    25

There's a whole heap of energy tied up in those little boxes.  No problem as long as it is let out slowly but, if released suddenly, bad stuff can happen.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


×