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The picture below is from a newly re-rigged c17 that I converted from a sock-style sail plan to a sail track plan.   I'm very pleased with the way it sails so far.  I don't have a lot of experience with sailing a cat ketch like this with the sprit sail design.  My question is this.  Does this look right for the main sail.  It has one reef set in and there appears a prominent vertical crease in the middle of the sail.  I tried to increase the snotter tension, but it seemed fairly tight as is.  Maybe this is normal for such a rig when the sprit is on the lee side of the sail?  The breeze was maybe just above a gentle breeze.

What do you think?

 

-Tom

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Also, if I can add to this question, the baggy appearance near the clew looks ugly to me.  Should I be doing something to make this "look better"?

 

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If you slack off of the snotter and tighten up the reefing line all the way then retighten the snotter until you get the draft that you want you will remove all of that bagginess. The sail still has to bend over the sprit when it is on the lee side of the sail but the big crease will be gone and the draft of the sail will be more uniform. 

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What Graham said. Haul in on that reef line first then tighten up the snotter. Some pics of us reefed in the Core Sound 20. You shouldn't have big wrinkles like that. We also sometimes get a little bag at the tip of the snotter but it has never been an issue. If it bothers you you can carefully roll the reefed section of the clew a bit more neatly when you tie the reef points up but we don't usually worry about it especially when you're main concern is reducing sail. 

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3 hours ago, mattp said:

Reefing line = downhaul?

I believe here the term "reefing line" refers to the reefing line at the clew- ie the line from the end of the boom through the first reef grommet on the leech of the sail and back to the end of the boom and through a turning block to cleat off along the boom.

Cheers

Peter HK

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Why is there a reefing  line anyway?  I insert the tip of the sprit in the loop at the reefing cringle/point just like as at the clue.  The sail shape is then controlled only by the snotter and no other lines are needed. 

 

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1 hour ago, Tom Lathrop said:

Why is there a reefing  line anyway?  I insert the tip of the sprit in the loop at the reefing cringle/point just like as at the clue.  The sail shape is then controlled only by the snotter and no other lines are needed. 

 

 

Thats how mine is set up too. I guess this is like a jiffy reefing setup which could be helpful.  I've had some stressful moments trying to thread the snotter end into a madly thrashing sail loop.  Can it be done with a single line or are 3 lines needed for double reefs?

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In this case it's set up with our reefing lines on the sprit which make reefing much easier when it's really blowing. Hanging onto the clew of the main sail in high winds even for a moment can destabilize a boat trying to heave to. This way you just lower the halyard, let out the snotter and pull in the reef line then hook up the new downhaul, hoist and pull in the snotter. This is how we suggest to reef all the Mark 3's. You can see the rigging sheet sample on the B&B website. 

Link: http://bandbyachtdesigns.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/15_CS20-mk3-Main-rigging.pdf

 

I've been getting lots of requests for this setup on standard CS17's as well. Yes it does add complication so you just have to decide for yourself. It increases rigging time and more spaghetti so it's not for everyone unless you like spaghetti. I love spaghetti!

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Yeah Alan,  I know that threading the loop can be a bit difficult in strong wind and the reefing lines can help maintain control to some degree.  Unless the reefing lines go to a point where the crew does not need to hold on to a banging sprit near the clew end, the advantage is partly washed out.  I've only reefed Lapwing once in its lifetime and that was not really necessary as we could have handled the full sail and had more fun.  I never ever reefed Loon (the Bay River Skiff). 

 

Lapwing has wishbone booms, battens and sail tracks.  For most day sailing, I would prefer to go back to laced on sails, no battens and straight sprits.  Very little performance is lost and the payback in simplicity, rigging time and effort is a great reward.  As the boats get bigger, the extra effort begins to pay off but not nearly as much as some may think.

 

Of course, I'm getting a bit long in the tooth and sailing needs to be simpler or it won't be enjoyed.  My fleet is shrinking as one sailboat and one powerboat is being sold and Lapwing is going to Maine to live with son Mark.                                                 

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