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Chick Ludwig

Core Sound 17 for sale

29 posts in this topic

I just saw this on Craig's list. It's in Greenville, NC

Core Sound 17 - $3900 (Greenville) Completed in 2013. Sailed only a few hours Dacron sails, aluminum masts, small electric inboard.

Roomy and stable. Heavy duty trailer. Ready to sail.

msgxp-5970357007@sale.craigslist.org

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Sold! Well, ... bought! By me! I'm excited to join the CS ranks. Can't wait to get out for a sail. I only learned about the design a month or so ago. Looks like a fun, capable, comfortable craft. My boat will probably benefit from some minor modifications (no halyard on this particular rig -- I'm confused) and additions.

 

This boat was built from plans. It has an older (?) sail without reef points. Alan from the B&B shop said that means it's a lace on sail. Anyone else out there have one? Is it annoying to try and reef by wrapping the sail around the mast?

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I have sleeved sails, like a Laser.  They stow on the masts as well.  This sort of setup does have advantages. For one thing, rigging for a sail is lightning fast.  Also, the sails are never "in your lap" at the dock.  To reef, you furl the main, and relocate the mizzen to the center position.  That represents a sail reduction of about 60% (see photo).  Please come to our Southern Appalachian Messabout on Lake Hartwell, April 22nd.  Most of us are also camping.

IMG_7704.JPG

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Thanks. I'll definitely try to make it. A couple more questions if you have a sec.

 

1. I just rigged the boat in my back yard. Looks like there's just enough mizzen sheet for a run. Should I have more than that in case I want to let the sail weathervane or switch sides and have some spare?

 

2. Doesn't look like there's a drain. Am I going to want one?

 

3. There are bulkheads, but I'm wondering if I want to add some closed-foam insulation under the benches. 

 

I dont have a third mast step. After seeing the video tour of Graham's Carlita, I'd love to get mine set up for reefing on the fly. The ball/ramp setup is genius. 

 

Thanks in advance.

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fats....., I'll chime in here along with Don. Hope you can make it to our messabout in April. I'll have Summer Breeze there, too. (Like graham's Carlita)

  1. It is good to have enough sheet to allow both sails to go forward of the mast for running downwind "wing-and-wing".

 

  2. Is there a bailer? That acts as your drain.

 

  3. Not really necessary

 

 Summer Breeze reefs about like carlita, but without the ramp. The ramp arrangement allows reefing both reefing lines from the cockpit. Both cleats are on the cabin top. I stand in the companionway to reef my main. It's like the mizzen with the aft reefing cleat on the sprit.

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1.  There are two advantages to having long sheets.  First, you can fly the sails slightly forward of amidships, as insurance against accidental gube.  Second, you can let them go way, way forward when beaching on a leeward shore.

2.  While I've not capsized YET, and I will, I understand that the side air chambers (you do have those, don't you?) float the boat very high. The only water you'll take on is that trapped above the seat.  For removal of this couple of gallons, an Anderson bailer is nice.  Most of us have one.

3. If you have the side floatation tanks (see photo, white), then no, you have enough floatation already.  If not, I'd think about doing something drastic.

IMG_5827.JPG

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2 hours ago, Thrillsbe said:

 I've not capsized YET, and I will, I understand that the side air chambers (you do have those, don't you?) float the boat very high

Some photos from my capsize test years ago showing how high the boat floats and how little water is left when righted.

Cheers

Peter HK

tn capsize2.JPG

tn_capsize 1.JPG

tn water post capsize2.JPG

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Fats,

Congratulations on a screaming deal. I had only basic sailing experience when I bought a Coresound 17 in 2008.  Figuring everything out was fun but I wish I had been near enough to go out for a ride with experienced CS17 sailors.  Sometimes boats that have "only been sailed a few times" don't have all the sheets, blocks, and reefing worked out and if you haven't got the plans it can be difficult to figure out.   

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Now there's a great reason to come to this year's spring Southern Appalachian Messabout!  At least three of us have (varying levels of) experience in sailing this rig.  I only have two, but have many years with sloops.  I love this rig!  Come on down, and we'll help you out.

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Yep, what Don said! We LOVE to show off our boats, and offer all the FREE advice we can---opinionated though it may be! I also am a converted "slooper". To try a Cat Ketch is to love a Cat Ketch. (Well, I gotta admit that sometimes when I try to ketch my cat, he get's kinda upset with me...)

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11 hours ago, PAR said:

The best cat ketch is a hungry dog . . .

 

Forum Wisdom Abounds.  

Lovin' it!!  

 

Congratulations Fats!

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Thanks, y'all!  I appreciate all the responses, as I definitely have a lot to learn here.  Looks like it has some decent hardware in place.  Though not having halyards totally threw me off.  The boat isn't the prettiest one in the fleet, I'm sure. There's a chunky epoxy job on the bow where the previous painter eye must have been. But it was garage kept and no rot, which was my big worry driving up there. 

 

It does have bench box seats. I just have to look around and make sure they're watertight. 

 

Im a huge fan of old rigs. I learned to sail on modern boats, but I was cured of that working on a schooner in Maine for five years in my 20s. Sailing big gaff rigs is fun, but being able to point higher than 60° is good, too. 

 

My brother and I built a Reuel Parker sharpie with a cat ketch rig and way too much sail. Love just setting the sheets and going. I read someone call it "lazy sailing". Nothing like ghosting along and shifting your weight to steer. 

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Got a quote for a set of single reef rows. The local UK Sailmakers here said that'd run me $200 or so. Given that's about a quarter the cost of a new suit of sails, I'm wondering if that's worth it, or if I'd rather spend the cash for a new set and keep these as a backup. 

 

Been doing some heavy tree tree work on the homestead the past couple weekends and haven't been out sailing yet. Been pretty breezy, too. Need those reef points!

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53 minutes ago, fatschoonerrat said:

Got a quote for a set of single reef rows. The local UK Sailmakers here said that'd run me $200 or so. Given that's about a quarter the cost of a new suit of sails, I'm wondering if that's worth it, or if I'd rather spend the cash for a new set and keep these as a backup. 

 

 

You haven't said whether these sails are lace on, sleeve luff or sailtrack although you did allude to the possibility they were lace on. Also you don't mention whether you want the ability to reef easily on the water. If you do then sailtrack is the only real alternative and if you don't have track on the mast you have to factor that in. So what I am saying is if you want the best reefing system then a new set of sails with sailtrack on the mast is the best option (and I have 2 reefs in each sail).

 

If you are happy to reef before launching based on the expected conditions then adding reef points to your current sails, if lace on, is probably a good option. If sleeve luff you have to have that altered too.

 

My choice was sailtrack with 2 reefs in each sail and permanently set reefing lines on my CS17 but that was based on many tens of thousands of offshore miles and memories of reefing in gale force winds in the middle of the night so it's probably overkill:unsure:

Cheers

Peter HK

 

 

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Laced sails can be reefed, though it's important to look at difficulty, when the need arises. When you want to reef, winds are building and the seas state is also building, so condisions are deteriorating and the boats movement is becoming uncomfortable. This makes doing anything on the foredeck much more difficult. Slab reefing systems with a slugs in a track is the most reliable way, but a laced sail can also be reefed. The best thing to do would be to test your reefing setup in modest wind strengths, to identify issues you might want to make adjustments to.

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