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Chespearl

CS 17 #191 build

27 posts in this topic

PAR,

Thank you for the paint tent photos and assembly tips. This looks like the way to go.

 

I'm rethinking my "order of operations" for painting the boat. I was planning to prime and final paint the interior and deck before I flipped the boat and glassed the hull. I'm thinking now that I should just do interior primer, then flip/glass/fair/prime the outside. Then I could erect a paint tent just for the top coats on the whole boat. I would still have to flip the boat inside the tent at least once but I have lots of help and overhead hoists. Sound reasonable? 

 

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There are better voices than mine on the subject,  but I do not believe flipping the boat inside the tent is very practical. The boat flipping always seems to go easier than planned, but it takes some space and more than I see in the tent. I would suggest building the tent twice instead.

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Lennie,

Agree, I would disassemble / move the paint tent as required to turn the boat over. 

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Do all of your painting at once, though separating inside and outside is often necessary. If you're going to paint, there's no reason to leave anything in primer, for any longer then it takes to dry. Primers stain very easily, they absorb moisture, scuff and generally are easily damaged, just leading to more hair pulling, so get the top coats on, while setup for painting. Roll her over after the paint is dry for a week or more, to insure no marks. For most this means painting the outside, then rolling her over to sit in a cradle or on the trailer to finish up the inside. I usually paint the outside pretty quickly, but wait on the inside until the last moment, because there's always that one set of holes that'll need to be drilled right after you've finished with the pretty stuff, at least with my typical luck, planning and forethought.

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You've said a mouthful, PAR!, "...  there's always that one set of holes that'll need to be drilled right after you've finished with the pretty stuff, at least with my typical luck, planning and forethought."

 

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PAR,

Thanks again. That is all great advice. I also read the "Painting" section on your website. Kudos to you for taking the time to write and share all that good info.

 

I see you are located in Eustis, FL. We happen to have two sailboats built in Eustis here at our museum in Solomons, MD. They were built by Earnest "Dick" Hartge, a well known Chesapeake Bay designer and builder who retired to Eustis in the late 1960s. Witch of the Wave is a traditionally built plank on frame livery boat. He built five or six of them in Eustis that he kept on the shore of his property to rent out and earn a little money. He actually prefabbed a lot of the parts here in Maryland and built the boats once he got set up in Florida. He called that design the "Breadwinner" class. Spirit is a much more interesting boat to sail. He built her in his 80s by and for himself. It was essentially his last boat as he only built one more smaller boat after that. She is strip planked and weighs about what a Lightning does, ~700 lbs. Hartge was well known for designing and building several winning boats in the Chesapeake 20 class. Spirit looks a lot like one of his Chesapeake 20s except Spirit is double-ended and 2 feet longer (22 ft LOD). Our boatshop did a restoration on her a couple years ago and she has a nice new set of sails. 

IMG_8001.thumb.jpg.23e95fc9d6c064d9086e9fa4bb91bc40.jpgIMG_8002.thumb.jpg.81f331fd951d4e264be15f590591e726.jpg

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The greats in society always seem to gravitate to the same places in life . . . ;) Spirit is a lovely thing. I wouldn't change a thing about her. The one thing I've found amazing about social media, is how truly small the word actually is.

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