Malwarebytes Endpoint Security
Advanced endpoint protection (affiliate link).
Chespearl

CS 17 #191 build

40 posts in this topic

Hi. My name is Brian and this is my first post on the forum. I started building my CS17 MK1 from the CNC-cut kit this week. As you can tell from my sail number I bought my CS17 plans back in 2006 but just recently got everything aligned to start building. I picked up my kit in October at the B&B Messabout. Had a great time and met lots of very nice folks. Thank you PeterP for taking me sailing on your beautiful 28-footer and thank you Alan for getting my kit together and loaded notwithstanding hurricanes and lots of things going on.

 

My boat will be an "aft cockpit" model with a main mast tabernacle. Here's my first question for the forum: I intend to mount a Honda 2hp 20" shaft outboard (29 lbs) directly on the transom. (I know, I know. I hate motors too. But I live a mile up a narrow creek and the motor will enable me to go sailing on some days when I otherwise couldn't.) The plans say "For transom hung OB, further reinforce." I plan to use large radius fillets all around the transom and the transom and hull will be sheathed with glass. In addition should I 1) make the transom from 12mm ply instead of 6mm and/or 2) increase the area of the 3/4" transom framing (e.g., make the horizontal top frame piece from a 1x6 or 1x8 instead of a 1x4)?

 

I also intend to add a UHMW plastic OB mounting pad.

 

Here is a photo from Thursday after gluing up the bottom and side panels.

 

 

 

post-4278-0-53035500-1483847070_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good luck with your build, Chespearl!  If it were me, I'd just add a 6 or 12mm doubler to the transom in the area of the motor mount.  But I would expect some other, more qualified, forum members to weigh in on this subject.  Chick Ludwig and Designer have both done fine motor mounts on their 17's, even though they're mk3's.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

For transom hung OB, further reinforce

On my CS 17 (number 165 also bought in 2006) I added a 3/4 inch doubler of Douglas fir between the deck beam and bottom where the outboard would go and glassed it. The aft seat is glued to this later on and makes the whole thing really rigid. I wouldn't add the extra weight of making the whole transom thicker as the side without the motor doesn't need it.

Here's a photo.

post-425-0-26444900-1484113735_thumb.jpg

 

Cheers

Peter HK

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On my CS-20 Mk-2, I built according to plan with a doubler going across the top, and extending down to where the seat mounting cleat was, but not below. Then there was a "pad" on the outside that extended below where the motor transom clamp ended. I could only find one photo of this.  

post-1823-0-01973800-1484143969_thumb.jpg

 

It worked out fine. I did about the same on Turtler, except that the doubler didn't go down to the seat.

post-1823-0-29154000-1484144203_thumb.jpg  post-1823-0-31304600-1484144204_thumb.jpg

 

I think that I would extend doubler down to the seat top, where the motor mounts, if I was to do this again. It would be about the same width as the "pad' that is on the outside.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don, Peter, Chick,

Thanks very much for your replies and advice. I'm a few days away from wiring in the transom so I'm going to make a decision soon. 

 

One more outboard related question: every small boat I've had with an outboard has had the occasional problem with the mizzen sheet (or main sheet on boom end sheeted sloops) catching on the outboard. That is one of the reasons I'd prefer not to use a bracket. When the problem occurs I want to be able to reach it easily. Some one on this forum (can't find it again) suggested a bungee and ring set-up on the mizzen sheet to avoid the problem. Anybody have a photo/drawing/more info on this set-up?

 

Here's photo from yesterday. I've got the cradle set up and leveled, and the panels ready to be joined. 

 

 

post-4278-0-28628400-1484144726_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I found the "ring and bungee" thread with a good photo here. Thanks for posting David!

 

Got my panels joined this AM. Will let the joints cure for a couple days.

 

 

 

 

 

post-4278-0-39098600-1484157525_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did "the butterfly" with the help of several friends at the boatshop on Saturday. Only surprise was the boat ended up bow high due to misalignment of the cradle supports. I had calculated the heights of the three (fwd, mid, aft) supports from the hull construction plan drawing. As that didn't give a good result, I went back and watched Alan's CS15 videos. I repositioned the fwd and aft cradle supports as if their bottoms should be level with a 2x4 cradle (mine is made of 2x6). Looks pretty good now and the relative heights of bow and transom corners are in the ballpark. I still have some "perkiness" in the sheer at the bow that I hope will go away once I fit the inwales.

 

 

post-4278-0-81955600-1484578729_thumb.jpg

post-4278-0-80148200-1484578730_thumb.jpg

post-4278-0-83170900-1484578731_thumb.jpg

post-4278-0-80857300-1484578732_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This morning we hoisted the wired hull out of the cradle so I could eyeball the keel line and bottom panel for fairness. Then more tweaking, leveling and plumbing. Last act today was tack welding the whole thing. 

 

 

post-4278-0-89880100-1485037876_thumb.jpg

post-4278-0-34061900-1485037878_thumb.jpg

post-4278-0-95256100-1485037879_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow, what progress. The boat is looking great already. Your determination to be accurate will pay dividends later in the build.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Got the keelson (aka keel batten) installed earlier this week. Will fillet and tape the center bay today.

DSCF3259.thumb.jpg.37b5accc39a645b3eb3d554d1b41d7d8.jpg

 

Now for something completely different...

We've been restoring a 1927 Old Town canoe in the shop. We put the new canvas on this week. Good fun! 

 

DSCF3224.jpg

DSCF3227.jpg

DSCF3228.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm behind in my updates so here goes:

Took our annual two week trip to Florida to escape the Maryland winter (actually very mild so far) so I had a little break from boatbuilding and time to think through some things. 

In my first week back I got the centerboard trunk in. Just can't have too many levels!

IMG_0849.thumb.jpg.6790688acf5c16ba08d7f28a33d47772.jpg

 

Then it was all about making hatch frames and covers. What a cool design! The kit-cut parts were perfect and Alan's video instructions about using the hot glue gun were just what I needed.

 

I got the hatch frames installed this week along with some additional seat top framing. Next week: seat tops!

DSCF3331.thumb.jpg.cc67b66dbe9c97ee3bdd16b8fd59d492.jpg  

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your centerboard trunk looks like it is not perfectly plumb; I think you should have attached a few more levels.

 

Just kidding!  You got a lot done, nice work.  I like the wood floor in your shop.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Amos,

I'm a volunteer (Patuxent Small Craft Guild) at the boatshop at the Calvert Marine Museum in Solomons, MD where I live. The museum is renting me space in the shop to build my boat. It is a great arrangement in a well stocked shop and I get all the help I could ask for from my fellow guild members. Sometimes the shop is too well stocked. When I clean up at the end of the day I often find a couple drill-drivers, three combo squares and seven pencils in the bilge. The wood floor is great for working; easy on the legs and if you need to anchor something, just throw in a few drywall screws. The only thing I'm dreading is painting as the shop is always pretty dusty. I'm still looking for ideas on how to deal with that.

 

Here are some photos from today after some sanding.

DSCF3333.thumb.jpg.82205c01baa62226a8887d8863a47b7d.jpg

 

DSCF3335.thumb.jpg.f0dee3e69577280be6859dc05a4f5eda.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Using some 1x2's, erect a box around your space and toss a plastic "drop cloth" over it. These are cheap and clear enough you can see what you're doing without having to bring in lighting. Staple the plastic to the frame work and make a big flap for a door. If you want to be able to reuse this plastic or so yoy can tear it down and reset it up, put packaging tape along the edges. This will permit your to remove it, without tearing it up too much. The tape on the edges also will make the door more durable.

   To futher this temporary paint booth thingie, make a frame (more 1x2's) so you can fit a big (24x24") A/C or furnace filter in one of the walls. Make two of these holes and in the other, preferably on the opposite side a small box fan. With the booth closed up, it'll suck in filtered air and exhaust fumes.

IMG_2378.jpg

   Above is using PVC pipe, but you should get the idea.

Garage-Paint-Booth-Gallery.jpg

   This is much more complex than the ones I use to make, but maybe this guy wanted something more durable. Mine had just enough 1x2's to hold stuff up and little else, but the door, fan and filter.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now