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Carlita goes under the knife

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Thrillsbe    62

Thanks for being so candid with your remarks, Graham.  It's a little comforting to me to see that "even you" get in a hurry, and forget a step once in a while.  Merry Christmas to you, your family, and all the crew at B and B.

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Designer    161

post-127-0-95665800-1482937814_thumb.jpg

 

Don,

 

I am my worst enemy when I get pushed hard. I say it is only my boat and I can fix it when I return. Suddenly a year or two passes and it bites me in the butt. If I can help someone understand the ramifications of not doing a proper job, then it is worth it.

 

Here is the 12" extended board in the up position and down. Now that it all fits I can close the trunk and glass the joints in the board and then glass the whole board.

 

You can see some of the damaged keel after the worst of the strings were planed off in the above photograph. I think that I will be able to save it, thanks to epoxy.post-127-0-05512900-1482937976_thumb.jpg 

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Designer    161

post-127-0-03460800-1484543242_thumb.jpgThe trunk and the centerboard have been finished. The keel was cleaned up and re-faired with the help from epoxy and the bottom was also cleaned up and re-faired and finished with two coats of Interlux 404 barrier coat and will be fine sanded ready for anti fouling.

 

While the boat was upside down I sanded the deckhead and cleaned up some rough epoxy. It will never be easier as I was working down hand rather than up hand when the boat is right side up.

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Designer    161

Alex,

 

I will finish the repair here. 

 

The first pic shows the trunk is finished and fitting the uphaul pennant. I laid up a sheet if glass with epoxy to serve as a butt block and under cockpit sheathing. My logic was that it would connect the underside of the butt joint and seal the bare ply under the final piece in one shot. You can see the glass butt block which has already been fitted laying the bottom.

 

Second pic shows the glass butt block glued in place. It was filleted around the perimeter through the hatch using a mirror and a gloved finger.

 

The third pic shows the final piece glued in and ready for glassing over the top side of the butt joint and then final fairing.

 

The question is, was it all worth it? I am glad that I did, I would have always felt that I should have done it. I had not finished the final coat of paint in the cockpit and once I did I might have been more reluctant to tear it up. I did not have a good chance to test it on the last trip as there was not a lot of tacking and there always seemed to be a current but I looked at my wake whenever I was closehauled and I believe it is better. Next week in the EC will be the real test as I will be head to head with a lot of boats.

 


20170118_151854.thumb.jpg.d8b7fcdad5bdd74119bf602569a64088.jpg20170119_115612.thumb.jpg.398bf1844acfd0fc72cc28c24d444567.jpg20170121_121851.thumb.jpg.471930b94e4e323ebe0c9363d250525e.jpg
 

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alexscott    11

Graham,

 

Thanks, but I was asking about the joints in the trunk- the epoxy coated piece of trunk side to the existing (primed) side & to the bottom inside the trunk

 

Best regards

Alex

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Designer    161

Alex,

 

I did that joint the same way as the cockpit sole. I used a glass butt block on the inside of the butt joint about 3" wide and glassed over the outside. While the glass butt block had some thickness, the board thickness was starting to taper at that point and was there was no interference. I made up a sheet of glass for both parts at the same time.

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Designer    161

The thing that I like about the glass butt block is that it is that it is a finished product. There is no need to coat or protect it, it will be there for as long as it is needed.

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