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HighDesert

Utah OB20

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PAR    194

I prefer to use bugle headed decking screws, having given up on black phosphorus drywall screws decades ago. Drywall screws just break, usually when you'd rather they don't. Deck screws are much tougher. The bugle head will suck most materials down by themselves, though I have boxes full of 1 5/8" deck screws with a 1/4" thick 2" square plywood pad on them, so I can improve hold down and adjustment and not leave a big head divot. Square drive are nice, but not as common in the economy fastener market in the USA. You can get them, but you pay twice as much and for a temporary fastener, hard to justify. Lastly, a counter sunk (or bugle head) fastener offers more holding power than a button, pan or truss headed fastener. On the other hand, if you need some minor adjustment under the head a slightly over size hole will permit a pan style (button truss, etc.) to accept this movement, which is why I use the plywood pads under my bugles occasionally.

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HighDesert    3

Thanks for the great tips and interesting discussion on fasteners.  

 

I'll go with screws with (and without) plywood pads at the bow sections and composite nails or staples aft.  I'll try nails first, since I have a brad nailer that accepts the size of nail I want to use.  I'll also be switching to deck screws.  I've always thought the cheap black drywall screws were one of man's greatest contributions, but after this discussion, I'm wondering why I mindlessly put up with their shortcomings for so long.

 

Speaking of those cheap black drywall screws, I've told myself that if one or two of them were to break off in my boat, they would become entombed in epoxy and never be exposed to moisture or oxygen and won't corrode, stain, etc.?  Correct?

 

Also, I've been assuming that to laminate the planking (or to join any two pieces of wood) I need to apply unthickened epoxy first to prevent the joint from being too dry.  Necessary, or not?

 

JP, I like your notched scraper idea to screed the epoxy onto the planking.

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Kennneee    9

I quit using drywall screws years ago.  Pocket screws are more expensive but I reuse them over and over.  I usually predrill but it is often not necessary since they will drill themselves.  Never had one break and the heads don't strip like phillips can. Once you wuit using Phillips you won't go back.   If they get stuck In cured epoxy I give them a blast of heat with a heat gun and out they come.  I use plywood washers when there is a lot of load to pull a plank in but often don't need to since they have a washer head.  I actually like them to make a very slight impression in the surface of the wood. It makes filling the hole easier, particularly on horizontal surfaces.  The indentation keeps the resin inplace as it soaks into the hole and accepts filler better. Bottom line is what you think will work best for you. 

They are available at most woodworking supply houses and Amazon. Pocket joinery has become quit common.  I find that the prices can vary quite a bit. I keep a number of different lengths with 1" being the most used length on this project.

Cheers,

Ken

IMG_1882.JPG

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Kennneee    9

I quit using drywall screws years ago.  Pocket screws are more expensive but I reuse them over and over.  I usually predrill but it is often not necessary since they will drill themselves.  Never had one break and the heads don't strip like phillips can. Once you wuit using Phillips you won't go back.   If they get stuck In cured epoxy I give them a blast of heat with a heat gun and out they come.  I use plywood washers when there is a lot of load to pull a plank in but often don't need to since they have a washer head.  I actually like them to make a very slight impression in the surface of the wood. It makes filling the hole easier, particularly on horizontal surfaces.  The indentation keeps the resin inplace as it soaks into the hole and accepts filler better. Bottom line is what you think will work best for you. 

They are available at most woodworking supply houses and Amazon. Pocket joinery has become quit common.  I find that the prices can vary quite a bit. I keep a number of different lengths with 1" being the most used length on this project.

Cheers,

Ken

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Riggs    4

The build looks great. Location is to much :)

 

On the screw end i pretty much use those square headed pocket screws all over they are great 

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PAR    194

Instead of those quite costly "Kreg" pieces, consider a button head "tech" screw, which are a lot cheaper and made the same way of the same stuff. Deck screws scan be found with square drive, though not as easy to find in the USA. 

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HighDesert    3

That is a funny one.  But, at least a Phillips-head rock can be used as a hammer...I hope my dad didn't hear that.

 

Lots of interesting and helpful discussion on screw selection, thanks.  Any quick comments on the other two questions?  Broken screws safe to leave in encapsulated in epoxy, or is it imperative to chisel them out?  Also, what about pretreating the planks with clear epoxy before laminating with thickened stuff? 

 

Carter

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meester    22

I don't  know if encapsulated screws actually cause problems.   However, If you worry about them, that's a good reason to take them out.  The boat's supposed to make you forget your worries, right?

 

The usual method for gluing is to coat the pieces with clear epoxy, then add the thickened stuff and clamp when everything is still wet.   The thin stuff penetrates the wood fibers better.   If you let the clear coat cure, then there's an opening for other problems such as the dreaded amine blush and weaker bonding.

 

 

 

 

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PAR    194

The only fasteners I've seen buried in wood that have survived, are bronze and good stainless, in epoxy. I have removed old galvanized, bright steel and black phorous screws, some also in epoxy, though not as well as a bonded fastener, that rusted. When in doubt, dig it out. A hole saw, with the pilot bit removed can get them out neatly (with some practice), so the hole can simply receive a dowel or repair. 

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