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Rdubs

Spindrift 10N help needed - outboard pad and fwd bulkhead question

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Rdubs -- Check out the motor canoe thread.  Paint has been discussed recently.  -- Bob

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Well, I just learned that Rustoleum's Topside Marine line is "polyurethane fortified", so I will step away from my typically conservative opinion on boat paint.  But I will say this-- I have heard many horror stories of builders who try to coat directly onto sanded epoxy with generic paint.  Chick did this, and it wouldn't dry.  If you want to take a chance on this stuff, at least give it one coat of Killz.  And FOR SURE, paint a test piece instead of your whole multi-month creation.  It's a crap shoot.  Use caution.  To me,  if you want to save a buck, use the Rustoleum.

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Primer is a "tie coat" designed to really grip a substrate and let top coats, get a grip on it. Top coat paints generally have too much "surface tension" to work well as a tie coat, though some are better than others, none are as good as a real primer. Lastly, primer is easily sanded, so you can fine tune the surface before the shiny stuff goes on. Top coats can also be sanded, but need to be recoated after, just to get the shiny back. I always use a primer, as it's cheap insurance.

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22 hours ago, meester said:

Rdubs -- Check out the motor canoe thread.  Paint has been discussed recently.  -- Bob

 

Meester - many thanks for the tip on that thread.  I read it and it looked like there was a paint which would fit what I'm looking for: these "Polyurethane fortified" porch / patio paints.  I swung by Lowe's and picked some up.  First coat is on, looks like going to need a second coat to get it thick enough to make it bright white, but so far so good.  I also did a little research to see which version would be better, the satin or gloss...the idea of gloss sounds better, but the consensus was that it's a bear to maintain and the gloss only comes out after lots of coating and sanding, so if you want something relatively low-effort to put on and low-effort to maintain, go for the satin.  A gallon of this was only like $27.  Edit: Odd, the Lowes website only shows this as coming in Gloss, but the store had Satin as well.

 

042397571565.jpg

 

https://www.lowes.com/pd/Valspar-Base-2-Tintable-Gloss-Interior-Exterior-Porch-and-Floor-Paint-Actual-Net-Contents-124-fl-oz/3343622

 

Will let you know how it turns out, and over time, holds up.

 

Question for you all, I managed to get some old fire hose which the plans recommend using the inner liner of as a fender around the outside of the gunwales.  When folks use a fender like this, how do you address the area where the oarlocks go?  The obvious answer is make a cutout for them, but I imagine you don't want water getting in under the fender which would happen if you made just a cutout, so it would need to have some kind of seal to it.  

 

Thanks again

'Dubs

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Hi everyone, quick question.  I ordered a couple screw-type deck plates so I can get to the bottom bolts needed to mate the two nesting halves together.  I totally forgot when I made those side seats for the bow section that I'd be covering up the bolt through-holes.  But what's the best way (or a good way) to make the required cutout where the deck plate seats into?  The most basic approach would seem to be trace out a circle, drill a few starting holes then run a jigsaw through to make the cut, but not going to be pretty since jigsaws work better in straight lines.  It's not really worth buying a 6.5" hole saw attachment even if I could find one.  Any tips from those who have done this?

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Thanks all,

'Dubs

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Place the ring on the surface where you want the deck plate and pencil in the fastener locations and the inside of the hole. Next measure the thickness of the threaded flange and center this in the space, using the marks as a guide. Add 1/8" to this measured diameter and cut to the line. You'll find there's not a lot of room to screw up, so be as accurate as you can be. Very often the packaging includes a cutting template.

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Don't fret.  The ring plate covers up all your squiggly cuts.  You can run a rotary microplane around the hole, but ain't nobody gonna see nuthin'!

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Use a compass and then a jigsaw. If you can't cut a circle with a jigsaw, get a different blade. You can buy rather thin blades that make cutting circles very easy.

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Oh, make ME look like a hack, why don't you?!  LOL I love that solution.  But seriously.  NOBODY sees it, as it's hidden by the ring.

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Thanks everyone again for the help.  Holes are cut and looks like a good tight fit.  For the first cut I used the removable access plate to draw the circle then measured an additional 3/16" onto it (the width of the lip), it took a while to file down to size but got there.  Second hole I was smarter, I flipped the removable plate over and the lip on the top was the same width as the extra width on the fixed part, so drew that circle and cut that.  Fit first time.

 

One tip I read on a different thread - before you cement the fixed ring pieces into place, do it with the removable piece inserted to force the ring into a perfect circle shape.  Someone I read installed the ring part and without knowing it, the ring part was pushed in slightly on one side which prevented the removable plate from threading in.  So they had to rip out the ring part and re-seat it after removing the material causing the off-center shape.  Just passing that along.

 

Say, what do you guys recommend for some type of sealant for the ring piece?  Should I try to find some RTV like from an auto store, or just regular caulk from Home Depot?

 

Thanks again.  She's almost done.  Will post some pics when she's together.

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RTV isn't the way to go, but if looking for a good, cheap and easily available product, the big box stores carry DAP stuff. DynaFlex 230 is the goo, which is a polyurethane and waterproof, mold and mildew resistant, etc. It's a sealant/adhesive and typically used for doors and windows around the house. It's adhesive qualities are fairly good and it has very good elongation, plus it's water clean up.

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I have been gluing the hatch rings into the boat with thickened epoxy and no fasteners for about 30 years now and never had one come loose or leak. Like you said, it is important that you have the hatch screwed in place to prevent the ring from distorting. When I push the hatch in place, some epoxy will squeeze out the fastener holes, I just wipe off the excess from the holes and clean up the perimeter and I am done. I always paint the boat before I install the hatches and I mask for the hatch ring to save having to remove the paint for the epoxy to bond.

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As far as cutting the holes out I found that trying to cut the complete circle with the jig saw to be a bit of a disaster. On the second on I drilled a center hole and then made about a dozen straight cuts out to the circumference. This allowed me to make a much rounder hole for the second hatch. I also put a second layer of ply in the seats behind the hatches so ended cutting 4 holes. The ply doublers are less for strength then so the screw tips wouldn't be sticking out into my storage area.

 

 

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I used a Dremel with a rotary saw bit and cut along the template line free-hand.  I followed the instructions on the package to use one part of the hatch as a template (I forget which side).  This worked the best.  A router is unwieldy for vertical surfaces.  I epoxied them in using through-bolts for clamping pressure as I didn't have that tight of a fit and the hatches fell out without clamping pressure.  I don't think I glued with the hatches screwed in, though it didn't seem to matter as the hatches all fit.  That's probably something they should put in the instructions. I sealed the ring with thickened epoxy. 

 

EDIT: I just realized I could've clamped the hatch rings in quite easily without fasteners if I'd had just left the hatches in and used some sort of prop against the door as clamping pressure.  This would've saved quite a bit of time.  

 

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Hi everyone

Put the boat in the water for the first time today.  Well, my backyard pool, but still its first float test.  Was neat to see it all finally come together.

Two quick questions:

1) I may just keep the dinghy tied up, afloat, in the corner of my slip next to my main boat (a 47' Jeanneau Sun Odyssey).  Since the Spindrift is the nesting version, that lower centerline through-hole (where you run the bolt to marry up the two halves) is under water.  As a result, even though that 1/4" bolt is a very tight fit, I think water is very slowly (over hours) seeping around and into the aft section of the boat.  Is there a way to use some caulk or something to create a better seal at least for this lowest centerline bolt hole?

 

2) If I did end up just keeping the dinghy tied up in the slip (as opposed to storing it on a mini-barge), any best practices to keep rain out of it?  Obviously one can put a tarp over it, but not sure if that buys you much without some kind of center support or way of making the center higher than the sides, otherwise rain will just pool in the tarp.

 

Thanks,

'Dubs

 

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I've seen way too many sunken dinks over the year, as to ever consider tieing one up. Two basic problems, accessibility and sweet water. With the boat in the slip with you, the dink also serves as a big fender what whatever else is in there with you. Now it would be nice if it was just your Bennie and the dink, but I've found the most convenient locations to store a dink wet, also tends to be the place everyone else likes to park their dink. If storing in the slip, without this concern, it's safer if it's on deck, a float or in davets. Clever folding ones and inflatables are the quickest to be snatched off the dock.

 

Sweet water is what sinks dinks 90% of the time. A healthy summer squall can roll through, easily overwhelming the best bilge pump. I've actually watched as neighboring dinks filled and swamped at their berths, while waiting for a thunderstorm to pass. 

 

As to storage, well there's the usual solutions with fabrics or it can be rolled up onto one of it's sides or ends. Best kept upside down if stored longer periods.

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Thanks for the thoughts PAR, good things to think about.  I'm fortunate that there isn't anyone else in my slip, so it would just be the mothership and the dink.  I'm thinking about building a floating platform / barge to store the dink on when not in use, but haven't figure out a concept I like yet.  The spectrum ranges from (at the easy end) just pulling the dink up onto a piece of floating rigid insulation foam and that's that, to just strapping some plastic barrels together with a cradle on top, to a full-blown legitimate mini-dock/barge.  

 

But back to the dink itself for a second, anyone have any best practices for reducing leakage around that bottom center bolt hole set?  Should I just try to use some caulk around the area before assembling the parts (similar to RTV), and then once dry even if I back out the bolt the water-tightness of it would have been improved?

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I'm searching in vain to find the thread about an outboard pad.  Leather was suggested.  I don't like that idea-- leather absorbs and holds water.  I screwed two sacrificial plates of 4mm Okoume to my transom.  I varnished them with polyurethane first.  When they get badly chewed up, I'll just make another set out of scrap 4mm.

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