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Rdubs

Spindrift 10N help needed - outboard pad and fwd bulkhead question

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Rdubs    1

Hi all,

Finally making progress again on my Spindrift 10N.  Unfolded and stitched up the sides to the bottom.  But have two questions:

 

1) Having trouble envisioning how, on the sailing setup, the outboard would be mounted.  I see on the plan diagram it shows how the outboard pad can be offset to clear the rudder pintles, but it doesn't look like it would be enough.  I have looked at dozens of pictures of the transom online but looks like everyone just uses the baseline stiffener/pad.  Does anyone have a picture of how the transom looks when the sailing version can accept an outboard, maybe a picture of the sailing version with a small outboard on the back?

 

2) The main nesting bulkhead fit into place without a lot of drama, but I am having a tough time with the smaller forward bulkhead.  I know there is a little note in the plans saying you might have to trim it but before I start cutting at it I want to make sure I'm not missing something.  The upper outboard edges really seem to be at a sharp angle compared with where the sides want to sit, and I almost feel like the sharp angles of the bulkhead at the top are trying to punch a hole through the side.  Any thoughts?

 

Thanks.

'Dubs

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Alex    24

I have the Spindrift 12 and there is no room for the outboard while sailing. At minimum you would probably need to step up to the Coresound 15 to have enough room on the back and also for the extra weight to not upset the boat too much. The Spindrift 10 is a lot smaller than the 12 overall so I think you need to forget it.

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Steve W    37

I made a block that is notched and as thick as the pintles to provide a spacer to accommodate the motor. My Honda 2opens plenty wide to allow the spacer.  But it's either sailing/rowing, or motoring/rowing, but no motor/sailing.

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I saw a picture of a spindrift with one of those extended motor brackets. I think the rudder was in place in the picture and the guy was sailing with the motor tilted up. I don't know how the motor affected balance. Also post sure that was a 12. Not sure how else you could do it.

Matt

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Rdubs    1

...But it's either sailing/rowing, or motoring/rowing, but no motor/sailing.

 

Thanks much Steve and folks for the helpful replies.  This little tidbit makes a lot of sense.  I think I'm going to gear mine towards sailing/rowing as the default configuration and then adjust if I want to try to mess with the outboard.

On the rowing, I read a while back some folks had modified their Spindrift seating design to make it better for rowing.  Something about how the changed the main athwartships seat to be more fore-and-aft oriented, so you can sit more further or backwards to position yourself best to row, as opposed to being locked into one spot to sit.  But I can't find the thread/s which talked about this.  Has anyone made modifications to the design like this?  (A bunch of replies said don't mess with the designer's design, but I am curious).

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Chick Ludwig    110

This kinda modification is well within bounds to improve/personalize your boat. Major structural changes are where folks get into trouble. Building a full standing cabin, mounting a 75 hp Merc, Building the hull out of Styrofoam sheets all fall into the no-no category. Besides, how boring is it to leave everything as designed?

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ecgossett    16

@Chick Ludwig, make sure they use the pink styrofoam from Home Depot. I saw a guy use 1" with 6 ounch glass on each side for deck boards in his cockpit. Not sure how it worked out longterm. On the positive note, it was the only flotation in that classic wooden sailboat.

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Rdubs    1

Hi gents and ladies,

Finally making progress on my 10N again after a long break.  Thanks to some help and encouragement from Graham, I finally epoxy'd the seams and will glass the seams shortly.  However I was looking at the instructions for the interior since that will be next and had a big question about the mast collar piece and the forward bulkhead.  (The plans say "see the companion CD for lots of photos" but I never received said companion CD so have tried to use Google image search a lot).  It looks like there is a "beam" installed forward of the forward bulkhead, as you can see here (Edit: this is not my boat, just an imagine I found on the web.  Wish my construction looked as good as this):

P1010324.jpg

 

But from the drawings I can't tell if the mast collar sits on top of the upper edge of the forward bulkhead/beam, and then there is supporting wood on either side onto which the forward seat/deck is placed, or if one is supposed to cut out a notch in the forward bulkhead/beam for the mast collar to slip into.  It looks like that is what this guy did:

_MG_4124.jpg

The directions don't say anything about cutting a notch, but I also don't see measurements for pieces of wood which go on either side of the collar if the collar just lies on top.

 

Any ideas?

Thanks

'Dubs

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Steve W    37

Definitely notched mine. Then I used a pattern bit after the deck was put on to make the whole mess stronger per some clue along the way. I just fixed the link in my signature. You can see in the photos. Use a pattern bit in a router after you glue the deck to trim to.

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Rdubs    1

You guys are the best, thanks.

Edit: Ignore my silly question about the rigging.  Just checked the B&B site and it says the mast kit is only like $160.  If that includes the boom then that's definitely the way to go, I will ask Carla.

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Rdubs    1

Hey all

Glassed the inside seams and now have to do the outside seams.  Had a question though concerning the keel installation.  Do you glass the bottom centerline seam prior to installing the keel, or do you install the keel first and then glass the keel in place?  Asking because if you glass the centerline seam, the keel will be mounted to a surface that has cured resin on it and it may not grab as well as if it were the wood.  The instructions say to use screws to hold the keel in place so maybe placing the keel down on top of cured glass doesn't matter much.

 

Thanks,

'Dubs

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Chick Ludwig    110

I glass before adding the keel. I then add the keel, but only epoxy coat and paint it. Here's why:

 

1. If you glass over the keel, but not under it, you risk getting water into the hull if you damage the keel, like on a rock.

2. If you glass over the keel after installation, you mall also trap water in it in case of damage, and repairs will be more difficult. It's much easier with just poxy and paint. Let er go until the end of the season, dry it out good, and repair all at once.

3. Scuff up the glass over the hull before bonding, just like any other secondary bond, if you worried about the "grab". Some folks just bed the keel in bedding compound and depend on the screws, making replacing the keel easier.

 

All just my opinion. As you can see, there are different ways folks solve the same problem. A lot would depend on the type of use your boat gets.

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Paul356    21

In addition to what Chick said, I'm not sure how you'd get a good bond trying to wrap cloth around the sharp bends of the keel.  If you wanted a tougher bottom on the keel, you could add a narrow shoe of a layer or two just on the bottom edge.  Otherwise, I did it the way Chick described, screws and sealant, with the idea the keel can be sacrificial if needed.

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Chick Ludwig    110

If you do decide to glass it to the hull, radius the outside corners, and fillet the inside corners so the glass will wrap around. But I'd still do it like I did---no glass. I did fillet the corner though---I dunno why---just like it that way. I do add a full length ss strip. Even on small boats, it's good to have this strip at the forward end where ya drag it up on the beach.

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Rdubs    1

Thanks everyone for the great information.  Build progress continues.  Inside and outside seams now fully taped and the mast collar is installed.  Next big thing are the seats.  Would appreciate any thoughts here:

 

1) Any best practices when sizing/cutting the nesting bulkhead removable seat?  Those little seat supports look tricky to get installed right.  Also, right now the boat is still all one piece, have not made the cut yet.  Should I make the cut and tighten up the bolts to eliminate that small gap currently in between the nesting bulkheads, or can I size/install the removable seat prior to making the cut?

2) Is it better to make the cut and then nest the front section into the stern section before installing the rear seat pieces, or would I be okay to just use the dimensions on the plan and it "should" fit?  Not sure how far off my actual lines are from the plan with regards to shape of the bow.  Part of the reason I am asking 

3) Odds are I will do a lot of rowing in this boat.  Are there any modifications to the stock plans one can do to make it more rower-friendly?  I read someone installed more of a longitudinal seat (fore/aft) since the stock nesting bulkhead seat doesn't give any flexibility for your seating position when rowing.  I can't find the post where the guy described it though.

4) Any other tips for doing the interior seat work / framing?

 

Thanks,

'Dubs

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Starboard    2

I made a center seat for my 10N that also fits at the stern when sailing. The side seats are removable but I'll be replacing the forward seats with built in waterproof compartments as the boats swamps too much when you capsize in sailing mode. It doesn't sink, but it sure takes on a lot of water. The built in seats will keep the sides floating higher when the boat is on its side. and won't scoop in as much water when bringing it up.

 

The photos aren't fantastic but you get the idea.

post-4336-0-14389300-1484963071_thumb.jpg

 

post-4336-0-84969900-1484963097_thumb.jpg

 

The center seat is shaped to fit in the stern, but sits on top of the side seats in the middle position.

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Rdubs    1

Hi Starboard,

Wow, that is a great setup you engineered!

Part of building my dinghy is to try and get my young daughter interested, or at least acclimatized, to sailing.  Being a little girl she is easy to scare and if the boat capsized and took on a lot of water, it would really scare her if she saw the boat swamp and look like it was sinking.  So I really should do your front section watertight seat compartment modification as that would help the boat stay more afloat.  I imagine that idea works on the front but would not work on the rear since the rear interior needs to be free for the front half to nest in.

Just a few questions to help me shamelessly try to copy your setup:

1) Do you happen to have any pictures of what the interior looks like with the side seats removed?  Do you just have small seat support blocks installed similar to the center seat ones in the stock plans?

2) In the bow section, how did you know the right height to put the front support blocks/stubs?  I am thinking that to get it level, you'd need to put the boat in the water and then use a level in order to make sure the side seats are level.  Did you just measure it out somehow with the boat in your workshop?

3) You have a rather large deck plate on top of the front seat.  Most people put a smaller one on the forward bulkhead (vertical), yours is the first I have seen horizontal (and it is big).  How do you like it?  It looks like the deck plate sits right on top of where the mast collar runs forward to the bow, does that cause any problems?

4) What kind of mast and boom are you using?  Did you use a mast and boom from some other small dinghy, or did you build your setup from scratch?  I think the plans calls for an aluminum mast but a fir/wood boom, but your boom looks metal.  I'd like to just appropriate a mast and boom from a small dinghy instead of having to craft one.

5) In the rowing configuration, how do you find the placement of the center seat?  Do you ever wish you could sit more forward or aft when rowing?

 

Many thanks.

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Hirilonde    168

The side seats mod is fantastic.  The worst thing about the nesting version in sailing mode is no good place to sit 'cept in the bottom.

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