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Walt S.

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Walt S. last won the day on May 6

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About Walt S.

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  1. I used a Dremel with a rotary saw bit and cut along the template line free-hand. I followed the instructions on the package to use one part of the hatch as a template (I forget which side). This worked the best. A router is unwieldy for vertical surfaces. I epoxied them in using through-bolts for clamping pressure as I didn't have that tight of a fit and the hatches fell out without clamping pressure. I don't think I glued with the hatches screwed in, though it didn't seem to matter as the hatches all fit. That's probably something they should put in the instructions. I sealed the ring with thickened epoxy. EDIT: I just realized I could've clamped the hatch rings in quite easily without fasteners if I'd had just left the hatches in and used some sort of prop against the door as clamping pressure. This would've saved quite a bit of time.
  2. I think the key is Robert has built "A few canoes, several kayaks (1.9 Kudzu boats), several sailboats, several pirogues, several sampans" so now his work is fast, cheap and good (pick any 3). While I am happy I built a Cadillac B and B and am finishing it with $50/qt paint, there is obviously a lot to be learned by building some smaller, faster, cheaper stuff and exploring the tradespace of variables such as paint type/cost/durability, lumber, etc. Or we can just read what Robert and PAR do and do that.
  3. You could go back and route that edge with a 1/4" roundover bit and then fiberglass tape that edge again if you're worried about the air bubbles. Looks great, btw. I agonized over the centerboard trunk for awhile. I watched Alan's video and then looked at the pictures of Spindrift building on the website. Boatbuilding has exposed all my neuroses to me.
  4. Actually, it sounds like your wife is quite lonesome with all this talk of loving your Zuki. It's like you have a Japanese mistress. My wife is already calling my boat 'My Mistress.'
  5. Also, it keeps these projects from ending in some sort of gruesome hara kiri.
  6. I think I found a new EZ loader with 1000 lb weight rating. I think it has torsion springs, so I'm not sure I can adjust them to the boat weight like you can with leaf springs. Otherwise, it's a great looking trailer. The guy is the main Lazer dinghy supplier around here and these are the trailers he uses for light sailboats. Any advice? I'll post some pictures in a bit.
  7. Looks pretty awesome, Dane. DOne is better than perfect as I'm finding out.
  8. Absolutely Ken. I'm too dumb to maintain an outboard so I plan on having my wife row me most of the time. Unlike Chick I (she) will be feathering the oars.
  9. Chick in CA you'd pay $35 in taxes just driving to the DMV.
  10. Here's a source for oars and oarlocks:
  11. Here's a link to the centerboard installation on Lapwing #20, built by one of our forum experts.
  12. Paul, I'm starting to notice the difficulty in finding a trailer. Maybe I need to car top my Spindrift 12 for awhile. I thought I wanted a Trailex, but I've not heard great things about its durability. For $1200 new, it better be rock-solid. Around here, dinghy sailors appear to be using EZ-Loaders. Used trailers, even for PWCs, are scarce here. https://sacramento.craigslist.org/boa/6129953544.html I might buy an EZ-Loader
  13. I took PAR's advice and used (single-part) Interlux Brightsides after prepping with their primer for single-part paints. I have only painted the wet locker beneath the aft seats. I am very happy with its appearance, hardness, leveling, and filling properties. The finish made it look like I had done more sanding and fairing than I had done. There is a new book on rolling Interlux (2-part) Perfection. I don't know if the same advice applies to Brightsides, but will try it out. Paint seems to be one of the darkest arts in boatbuilding, which is why PAR gets paid the bigbux.
  14. What is their approach to the stem?
  15. thanks. I think I'm going to stop being a wimp and fair the tapes. Now I see why these projects drag on for years: you think you've made it to the top of the mountain only to see the next peak across the valley is higher. I'm being pretty melodramatic here. I DON'T LIKE SANDING.