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Kennneee

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Kennneee last won the day on December 31 2016

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About Kennneee

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  • Location
    Salt Spring Island, British Columbia

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  1. Scuppers

    Hi Henry, That is a good endorsement for the ping pong ball style of scupper. I have to continually remind myself that this is not going to be an offshore boat and getting swamped is pretty unlikely. Haven’t computed the volume difference between the 2 styles but the flapper scuppers clearly have the ability to dump more water in a hurry. I guess enough is enough.... As i continue my build I often look at pictures of your Bluejacket. Full of good ideas and beautiful craftsmanship. Thanks. cheers, Ken
  2. Scuppers

    Hi All, About to install scuppers and vacillating between larger rectangular style with a flapper door or the smaller volume ping pong ball style. Any input appreciated. Ken
  3. Marissa # 63

    Stunning! I am totally impressed! Ken
  4. Outer Banks 26 #1

    Link to complete album https://goo.gl/photos/42vU3BKQDsnMxbPp9
  5. Outer Banks 26 #1

    Hi All, It has been a long time since I sat down to share my progress on Rosie. The decks are on, sheer line tweaked and foredeck faired to look correct, anchor well in place, some ceiling added in the forward cabin and tank coffin compete. I also added a strip of wood with a rolling bevel to the forward 16’ feet of the sheer. This will make the Sapelle rub rail easier to bend in place since it is no longer needs to be twisted into shape. The price we pay for a beautifully flared bow. There is floatation in the bilge areas which may have been a waste of time. Hope never to find out. I will begin the interior framing very soon. Need to make some decisions on the layout. Things are moving along. Ken
  6. Marissa # 63

    BEAUTIFUL! Take a victory lap!
  7. A Visit From Graham

    Carter, The first part about the master designer is spot on. The second is an act of kindness. I never expected Graham to sail here so who knows if a trip to the desert could be possible. Carlita is capable of some unexpected feats:). Ken
  8. A Visit From Graham

    I attended the Port Townsend Wooden Boat Festival this year. Got to meet Graham in person and see his beautiful CARLITA. There was a pretty constant stream of people admiring his boat and the clever details that seem to be in every corner of his boat. The self steering system was a real crowd pleaser. After the show Graham sailed his 17' Core Sound to Salt Spring Island were we live. We tracked his progress via his SPOT link. Seeing CARLITA come into view was s beautiful sight indeed. Beauty and function! Got to know Graham a bit and besides being a WIZARD he is an exceptionally nice guy. What a treat to share some meals, hike and have him look my Outer Banks over and point out some of his thinking on design. Here is a link to a few more pics. https://photos.app.goo.gl/QgFVmWgUK9yqSgBF2
  9. OK256 in Vanuatu

    Wow! Stunningly beautiful. Any input on overall performance?
  10. Utah OB20

    I quit using drywall screws years ago. Pocket screws are more expensive but I reuse them over and over. I usually predrill but it is often not necessary since they will drill themselves. Never had one break and the heads don't strip like phillips can. Once you wuit using Phillips you won't go back. If they get stuck In cured epoxy I give them a blast of heat with a heat gun and out they come. I use plywood washers when there is a lot of load to pull a plank in but often don't need to since they have a washer head. I actually like them to make a very slight impression in the surface of the wood. It makes filling the hole easier, particularly on horizontal surfaces. The indentation keeps the resin inplace as it soaks into the hole and accepts filler better. Bottom line is what you think will work best for you. They are available at most woodworking supply houses and Amazon. Pocket joinery has become quit common. I find that the prices can vary quite a bit. I keep a number of different lengths with 1" being the most used length on this project. Cheers, Ken
  11. Utah OB20

    I quit using drywall screws years ago. Pocket screws are more expensive but I reuse them over and over. I usually predrill but it is often not necessary since they will drill themselves. Never had one break and the heads don't strip like phillips can. Once you wuit using Phillips you won't go back. If they get stuck In cured epoxy I give them a blast of heat with a heat gun and out they come. I use plywood washers when there is a lot of load to pull a plank in but often don't need to since they have a washer head. I actually like them to make a very slight impression in the surface of the wood. It makes filling the hole easier, particularly on horizontal surfaces. The indentation keeps the resin inplace as it soaks into the hole and accepts filler better. Bottom line is what you think will work best for you. They are available at most woodworking supply houses and Amazon. Pocket joinery has become quit common. I find that the prices can vary quite a bit. I keep a number of different lengths with 1" being the most used length on this project. Cheers, Ken
  12. Utah OB20

    Carter, I agree with Russell. Worked well on my OB26. They tend to blow out a little wood when the come through to the inside plank but that is easily filled later. Screws and staples are a good combo. I use square head POCKET SCREWS. Much better than drywall screws. The square head and built in washer are a big advantage. Ken
  13. Utah OB20

    Carter- looks really nice! Love seeing your pics. Ken
  14. Fuel Tanks, Splash well, Windows...

    Yikes! Changed the battery in my motorcycle today and had a new respect for the " acid bomb" that I swapped out. Thanks Dave.
  15. Fuel Tanks, Splash well, Windows...

    Thanks again Egbert!
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