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rodbuilder

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About rodbuilder

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  1. How exactly are the painter loops installed? What I understand is that the holes are drilled in the frame before skinning. The skin is then finished before a hole is placed in the skin for the painter. How do you put the hole in the skin? How do you seal the hole? How do you keep the painter from pulling at the fabric while at use? It seems that even though the skin is tough this would be a critical part? Any close up of painter loops installed?
  2. What is the draft of the Cast Away at 250lbs? Can you do a wet re-entry into this boat? What is the best seat for this design?
  3. I really love kayaks, but not really great for me now where I live. There are no lakes or big rivers near me, just small ponds and creaks. If I still lived nears Smith lake I would be building a kayak first. I am in the process of putting it in freeship and laying out everything. I will post it when I finish and those that have freeship or cad can critique my design.
  4. I now have a design. My question after reading both of Jeff's books is stringer locations. I would like to place 3 stringers on each side plus the gunwales and keel. I am just trying to figure out the placement for the stringers on the curves so they will lay right. I would appreciate any help. I have not found anything on how to locate the stringers.
  5. As far as the back goes it all depends where your back hurts. I will take a canoe over a kayak any day on flat water as far as comfort. I have three compressed discs and with a good back rest and leg room (I mean from floor to butt really) it helps mine. The trick with canoes is learning to paddle efficiently and without leaning, it’s not taught but you would be amazed the difference in leaning and not leaning. As far as stability, it all comes down to design and load. A canoe or kayak designed for 250lb with super stability can be very unstable with 175lbs or 400lbs. Height above CG (center of Gravity) comes into play more when the boats get narrow. From a look without seeing more details on the design the stonefly looks as though it should be a decently stable boat, with a load. With little weight it looks like it would be unstable. It looks to be able to handle a seat off the bottom with a back rest, but I have not studied the plans.
  6. What are the differences in the two designs, is the crawfish solo a shrunk version of the tandem? Does the new book contain both or just the tandem design? I have searched the forum and have not found anyone build one yet or did I miss it?
  7. I am looking to build a SOF canoe, and I cannot decide what type of build or which boat. On type: I am considering the Hilary Russell style, do not know what its called, and the kudzu style. I think the Russell style looks cleaner, but more difficult. The kudzu looks easier and sturdier but I do not like the higher ribs. What are some of the other differences in these styles? Weight? Cost? Build time? On design: I am looking for solo double paddle canoe. I have looked a pirogues, Rob Roy, and several other designs. I am leaning toward a Rob Roy design in the 13'6 length. Can a boat designed as a wood strip construction be turned into a SOF construction? I have a set of lofting tables for a Rob Roy style, how would I go about converting it if possible? Use: The canoe will mostly be used going down creaks and rivers, there may be some run in with rocks but mostly just smooth water. (I know the SOF can not handle the abuse of white water, it may just see an occasional rock.) Being in narrow water it must be able to turn and maneuver well, tracking is secondary concern. Skills: I am a woodworker and engineer (mechanical not nautical), and have built a wood stripper before. Any helps, comments, or questions welcomed.